Uechi-Ryu.com

Discussion Area
It is currently Sun Oct 26, 2014 3:43 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Nov 22, 2010 10:14 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Wed Sep 16, 1998 6:01 am
Posts: 6021
Location: Mount Dora, Florida
Mr. Mattson"

On the suggestion of my sensei, Tracy Rose, from the Northboro dojo ,I hope that I am not being too forward by asking you for direction on a matter which I would like to eventually present to you in the form of a written essay...The topic is the anatomical/kinesiology correctness of the Uechi style (succinctly stated)

I have been a Uechi student for close to 17 years, presently a sandan, I am also a practicing physician for the last 35 years, specializing in cardiology. The more I practice the Uechi-style the more convinced I become of its anatomical correctness and its sound basis in human kinesiology (musculo-skeketal movement) to maximize strength movement and mechanical advantage (in other words: no mythical or supernatural powers...basically perfecting human body mechanics) .

I would like to explore this concept with any reference material or people in the discipline who have similar thoughts , in order to compose an essay...Many of the thoughts which I produce to my sensei and class are my own perceptions and interpretations...I would like to explore if there are other students or masters have thoughts which they could share

John Ferullo

(I responded by asking permission from John to post his letter here. GEM)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: More. . .
PostPosted: Mon Nov 22, 2010 10:15 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Wed Sep 16, 1998 6:01 am
Posts: 6021
Location: Mount Dora, Florida
Mr. Mattson

I would be honored to have you post my letter

The thoughts that I have on the matter is as follows: The western forms of art science math etc. as compared to the eastern interpretation of many disciplines took place over thousands of years and were separated on vast space called the European-Asian (Eurasion) land mass. (I am quoting a former professor of mine from Harvard, named Edwin O. Reischauer). My proffessor had theories about the relationship of England to Europe and drew similarities with Japan off of mainland Asia

Although many of the various disciplines were developed somewhat differently, there are some similarities...even complementary. The perception a the human form as pictured by Di Vinci..has differences with the Uechi pose...but I find aspects which are very complementary

The Di Vinci human form shows an individual in the standard textbook form in a pose showing all of the muscles exposed with equal flexion and contraction showing the agonist group of muscles partially flexed opposed by their antagonist muscle equally flexed (e.g. the biceps and the triceps..the flexor muscle groups of the legs as well as the arms and the antagonist group). The other aspect of the Di Vinci illustration is that as one looks at the human muscular system as illustrated in the upright position, all of the muscles run from north to south, head to toe ...yet purposeful movement is "east to west" somewhat perpendicular to the Di Vinci model

Enter, the eastern interpretation of body mechanics...phrased karate (empty-hands). I think that at first impression, one would conclude...no weapons, no tools...The deeper meaning lies in uncovering the mechanical advantage which the human body has been endowed.

The Sanchin -kata, illustrates the basic principles. The initial pose muscles in a relaxed flexion state, the center of gravity, lowered ...the limbs pulled into the torso...the torso serving as the fulcrum for launching the strikes from the low center of gravity...firmly grounded.
I could easily go on and on...The thing that seems apparent to me is that the body mechanics which we utilized with regard to martial arts Uechi-style. are applicable to other things..such as a golf swing, a linebackers movement in football

I try to bring this out when asked or invited to participate in analysis of moves during class (certainly try not to usurp authority)

Would be interested in ideas from other practitioners//

Sincerely John


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 22, 2010 5:31 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 21, 1999 6:01 am
Posts: 3559
Location: Valhalla
Quote:
The western forms of art science math etc. as compared to the eastern interpretation of many disciplines took place over thousands of years and were separated on vast space called the European-Asian (Eurasion) land mass. (I am quoting a former professor of mine from Harvard, named Edwin O. Reischauer). My proffessor had theories about the relationship of England to Europe and drew similarities with Japan off of mainland Asia



Mathematics in ancient India were far more advanced than their western counterpart. Their numerical system allowed more rapid calculations to be made. Try multiplying with Roman numerals for example. I don't know however what the impact was on Japan. Chinese scholars however did study at ancient universities in India, so it is possible the math system was brought there from China like the written language.

I think there are some places where power is increased through Kata. In other places the opposite may occur. Take the elbow strike for example, anyone wanting to hit a bag hard is going to elbow strike with the foot in the rear position behind the elbow. However if you step in with the elbow strike and utilize momentum, unlike the kata in most dojo, you generate more power. Interesting topic. I'm sure the science will be sailing over my head soon!

_________________
Sans Peur Ne Obliviscaris
www.hinghamkarate.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 22, 2010 10:05 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 30, 2006 9:52 pm
Posts: 1146
Location: Massachusetts
f.Channell wrote:
However if you step in with the elbow strike and utilize momentum, unlike the kata in most dojo, you generate more power.


This confused me a little. You mean non-Uechi dojo?

_________________
Mike


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2010 1:10 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2001 6:01 am
Posts: 2142
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
I have been taught elbow strikes two different ways within Uechi Ryu:
- move inside the opponent's defenses and then execute the elbow strike with little momentum
- strike while stepping in to use momentum to drive the elbow strike
I see both as having potential utility depending on the situation.

Quote:
I am quoting a former professor of mine from Harvard, named Edwin O. Reischauer

Reischauer was a well-respected American expert on Japanese history and culture, who served as ambassador to Japan in the early 1960s and wrote numerous books on Japan. While ambassador he was stabbed during an attempt on his life in 1964 by a Japanese man; he survived but in 1990 he died of complications from the hepatitis he contracted through a transfusion he received after the attack.

_________________
Glenn


Last edited by Glenn on Tue Nov 23, 2010 10:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2010 1:30 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am
Posts: 17143
Location: Richmond, VA --- Louisville, KY
Fred, Mike, and Glenn:

Interesting topic for a thread. Can we start it on a new one? (I really do want to comment.) I just would rather we not hijack Dr. Ferullo's thread.

Thanks! :)

- Bill


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2010 1:43 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 21, 1999 6:01 am
Posts: 3559
Location: Valhalla
Sure Bill, I thought power generation was the theme. But start a new thread if you wish.
Were you thinking of a more engineering-scientific slant to the discussion?
Either way should be good reading.

F.

_________________
Sans Peur Ne Obliviscaris
www.hinghamkarate.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2010 1:54 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am
Posts: 17143
Location: Richmond, VA --- Louisville, KY
Hey, John!

Small world. I'm a PhD biomedical engineer, and I did a 4-year research stint in the division of cardiology at UVa. What are the odds?

You have an interesting way of thinking about the subject. Do tell more! You have an eager audience here.

- Bill


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Exabot [Bot] and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group