Uechi-Ryu.com

Discussion Area
It is currently Sun Dec 21, 2014 2:38 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 44 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: And then...
PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 4:43 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am
Posts: 30550
http://tinyurl.com/29ngep3

Many people will walk/run trails without giving second thoughts to predatory attacks by animals or humans. Yet they know it has happened and it could happen to them...but they go into denial...

Why?

And why would they not consider carrying some sort of weapon just in case?

:? Some of the people I have talked to prior to their going for such walks/runs...are really baffling.

I think it is nature's way to cull the human race. :idea:

_________________
Van


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 4:59 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am
Posts: 17233
Location: Richmond, VA --- Louisville, KY
This is the same victim I posted about in the beginning of the thread.

There is this one piece...

Global Toronto wrote:

If Mitchell ran from the coyotes or panicked, it may have triggered a predatory response in the animals, he said.

As Yogi Berra would say, déjà vu all over again. Can you say chase instinct?

Even as a little kid I knew this about the dogs in my neighborhood. You NE-VER run from them. Once you do, they can't help their responses.

People are the same way.

- Bill


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 5:08 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am
Posts: 17233
Location: Richmond, VA --- Louisville, KY
Jason Rees wrote:

The problem with wolves is that they have no natural predators.

As I posted above, there is the Irish Wolfhound. That's where they get their name from.

Image

- Bill


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 5:25 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am
Posts: 30550
Quote:
I was out on an afternoon hike with a friend on the trail around Lake Hodges in Escondido when two coyotes pranced across the trail in front of us. They were heading in the general direction of the lake, and were not even 15 yards away from us. I had my German Shepherd with me.

We stopped and I pointed out the coyotes to my friend. They stopped and stared. My dog noticed them (first time in all the times I have been with him and seen them). He did not react as he would if it were a loose dog, but he did start to whimper shepherd style. This was my closest encounter, to be sure.

I had just read an article about coyotes that morning. One thing it said to do was to wave sticks, make loud noises, like what they say to do when you see a Mountain Lion. The article talked about how coyotes have gotten bolder around people, and it is good to try to scare them, and not turn your back on them.

I was not too worried with it being only two coyotes, but I was concerned there could be more in the bushes. I yelled in a deep voice and the smaller one ran into the woods.

The bigger one started off, then stopped and gave me a stare down. I felt I had no choice but to make more noise, I even threw a dirt clod that hit a tree not far from the coyote.

He flinched a bit, but just stared, then finally turned and went on. We were so close to the lot where our car was that we hurried on the trail. When we got to the car, we heard several yips coming from the woods. I guess the coyotes found something they were happy about.

I actually wish I had had my camera, because these were beautiful animals...just like the picture that 1AngryTaxPayer posted previously.

I do find it disconcerting that it was not even dark, although the sun had gone below the skyline of the hills, but these guys were out and seemed to have little fear. Not the skittish animal I have seen in other wilderness settings.

So I am spooked again...and will need to be very careful about when I walk on that trail. I thought the sunlight hours were safe hours. Several years ago I used to bike the trail around the same time of day, but the bike was much faster...and with the dog now, I really want to walk places and not have to worry too much about getting attacked.

Today I also learned more about the coyotes that live along the north county rail trail near my house. Neighbors told me that there have been packs of coyotes along those tracks for many years. It's amazing to me since the trail runs pretty close to a busy road.

I also heard that several years back a woman was on that busy road sitting at a bus stop when a pack of coyotes attacked her. It was early morning, just before dawn. That is spooky because I thought the busy road was safer for me to walk the dog along
.

_________________
Van


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 5:50 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am
Posts: 30550
I was on the rifle range, once, a large piece of property with ranges up to 300 yards, surrounded by wild woods.


But I was on the 300 yds range doing bench rest shooting with my M1 Garand.

Out of the corner of my right eye I got a glimpse of a large coyote trotting along the right side of the range in the woods about 100 yards from me and staring, unafraid of the big bangs of the '06 battle rifle.

We are not allowed to fire at angles at the range for safety...but being alone, I decided to pack the rifle and leave the range that day.

Coyotes are sly, cunning and devious. My thought was it might try to circle me and attack from the woods at my back as I was intent at firing down range.

I always have a cocked and locked concealed 1911 .45 caliber...with me in a shoulder bag...easy to get to...when on the range alone firing rifles....so that I have that weapon at my reach at all times when packing and unpacking other firearms.

Have heard that some punks robbed a shooter of his guns once at the club.

Also that there have been shots fired in the area of the club hitting a few homes.

So when in the woods, there is always danger of some predation.

Having a cell phone is critical.

_________________
Van


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 8:28 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2007 11:06 am
Posts: 1750
Location: USA
Bill Glasheen wrote:

The only problem would be the degree to which they're poaching on farm animals. Is that a concern in Alaska? Got sheep? (Methinks not so much.)


Ah, but moose are Alaska's sheep. This state has people who live in remote areas, and for whom a gallon of milk costs $8.00, and so moose is considered subsistence, and can be hunted by those individuals. If a pack of wolves gets too big and starts truly decimating a herd, to the point of nearly (or in the case of one island, completely within a few more years) wiping it out, human beings starve.

State and federal officials are always squabbling over animal management up here. Animal rights groups are abundant, and the media is all over every thing. If something goes out of whack, the whole state will know about it within a few days.

Quote:
That's all fine and good until you kill so many wolves that you have another problem (e.g. the deer or other grazing animals).

It's all supposed to be a balance. Man doesn't exactly have a good track record getting it right.

- Bill


Hunting is a good-sized chunk of Alaska's economy (behind oil and tourism (which itself is tied in with hunting). Looking at the everything, I think they're doing a pretty good job of it. Nobody's perfect, but since the state seems stuck in its present modus operandi, taking away wildlife management in the name of balance would knock everything off kilter.

_________________
Life begins & ends cold, naked & covered in crap.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 11:14 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed May 15, 2002 6:01 am
Posts: 1450
Location: Jeddore
Quote:
Many people will walk/run trails without giving second thoughts to predatory attacks by animals or humans. Yet they know it has happened and it could happen to them...but they go into denial...

Why?

And why would they not consider carrying some sort of weapon just in case?

Some of the people I have talked to prior to their going for such walks/runs...are really baffling.

I think it is nature's way to cull the human race.


Culling our race... nature does its best :lol:

I have seen a fair amount of NS coyotes in my hiking and virtually slept among them winter camping. They are an interesting and curious species the 'Bluenose coyote" Larger than even its nearby cousin here in New Brunswick (for now). In my tent I woke to sniffing and could see shadows...very soft sounds of movement. They did not call to each other during the night which is unusual. Strange as it may sound I fell into the best sleep I can recall.
In the morning I found young adult size coyote tracks around my tent, a curious young adult by the way he moved in on a "zig zag"...my snoring maybe ;) I was not in danger even with only fabric between us.
The young lady who was fatally attacked in NS in the tragic event caused a serious backlash against the coyote...her parents asked that the animals not be culled or a bounty on the animals be placed. Bounty or no bounty they are here to stay so resources should be placed in educating people on how to interact with animals. Like my dad told me when we were picking blueberries and I spotted a bear in the distance " Don`t pick off the same bush". My dad understood animals (wild/domestic) and walks in the woods always included a walking stick and observation. The pole in your hands makes you look bigger (imagine what the predator sees).
Now...to run with music through the woods then you are foolish. What does the predator see? If you spot coyotes as you walk in the woods what signals are you giving? Can you sense they are hunting or are they hoping you will cause smaller prey to move for them like a field mouse etc..?
If your hair stands on the back of your neck it occurs for a reason...become large and be vigilant. If attacked point the pole at the approaching animal...do not swing it as you are about 1/3 as fast. Plan your footing as it is not the time to stumble over a tree root or fall into the bushes. Low voice not high pitched...confidence so they keep those powerful jaws in check.

_________________
Léo


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 11:57 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am
Posts: 17233
Location: Richmond, VA --- Louisville, KY
Leo you are a man after my heart. I think we would be great neighbors.
CANDANeh wrote:

Can you sense they are hunting or are they hoping you will cause smaller prey to move for them like a field mouse etc..?

True story... I have had both birds and dragonflies hover around me and follow me around my (Virginia) property.

The birds? One year I had lots of moths in the thatch of my lawn. When I mowed, this bird would hang out in the trees near where my loud riding mower was operating. As I got over any area and flushed out the moths, it would dive-bomb sometimes within inches of my head to get at the moth I had stirred up. It nested under my front porch. I sometimes would fall asleep in my Lazy Boy downstairs, and would be awakened at o-dark thirty to my friend cleaning out the bugs flying around my back porch lamp.

And my dragonflies? I've had them land on my belly while I'm reading the mail at the mailbox, and stay there for 10 minutes at a time. Why? Dragonflies like mosquitoes, and I live near wetlands. I love him, and he loves me. And I don't have a mosquito problem.

While I understand Jason's desire to control his environment and don't have a problem with people hunting (PARTICULARLY for food), I just have my way.

- Bill


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 3:33 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am
Posts: 30550
And sometimes it's all about 'kill or be killed'

Anyone having trouble with this is next in nature's 'cull' :lol:

_________________
Van


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 3:42 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am
Posts: 30550
Leo,

Here's the walking 'stick' to have when walking the woods...

Made by the famous Crawford.

http://www.crawfordknives.com/SURVIVAL% ... GE%201.htm

But most people won't spend the money or feel self conscious about having one, preferring to take chances...

Like I said...nature has its mysterious ways to cull the human population. :wink:

_________________
Van


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2011 3:51 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am
Posts: 17233
Location: Richmond, VA --- Louisville, KY
Here's one of my buddies around the yard. He's looking right at you.

Image

Here's another. You can actually recognize one vs. the next. They each have a unique color pattern, behavior, and favorite resting spot.

Image

My point? As was suggested by Leo above, sometimes the "wild creatures" in Nature can learn to live with you while maintaining their wildness. That's the best of all worlds.

- Bill


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Wow
PostPosted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 1:24 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed May 15, 2002 6:01 am
Posts: 1450
Location: Jeddore
Quote:
Here's the walking 'stick' to have when walking the woods...


Not sure my scouts would be allowed to have one but WOW! Over the years I have seen clever modifications to basic equipment and the survival staff hits near top of the list.
Quote:
I think we would be great neighbors.

Well Bill :) We would certainly entertain our other neighbors I`m sure of that.
Quote:
Nature can learn to live with you while maintaining their wildness. That's the best of all worlds.

Right on. The "wild" only takes what is needed...they will leave your Rolex alone :wink: Anyone that has had a working dog sleep by his side has been given the opportunity to experience co existence.

_________________
Léo


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 3:54 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am
Posts: 30550
Quote:
Not sure my scouts would be allowed to have one but WOW! Over the years I have seen clever modifications to basic equipment and the survival staff hits near top of the list.


It sure is a clever design. But in talking to many people over the years, it was apparent to me that they were in a huge denial situation re the dangers of solitary exposure to trails...by four or two legged predators.


It is a mindset unique to sheep or sheepdogs...some of us are predestined to a defenseless slaughter :wink:

Imagine the sheer panic a person would feel when suddenly alone and realizing they will be dead or worse in a few moments....

Their lives are at an end...they will remember the wisdom of having a defensive weapon in the last few seconds of their lives.

Worse...if one survives and a family member perishes...they will be dying a thousand deaths before their final chapter.

_________________
Van


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Nice....
PostPosted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 5:55 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 16, 2010 2:36 pm
Posts: 414
Location: Strongsville, OH
Vann is like MacGyver!!!! :lol:

If you think that's a sweet tool Leo, you should see his tooth brush that turns into a flame thrower!!! :lol: :lol:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 25, 2011 3:30 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am
Posts: 30550
8)

_________________
Van


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 44 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group