There is no First Strike in Karate – the Training’

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There is no First Strike in Karate – the Training’

Postby Victor Smith » Fri Jul 15, 2011 1:24 pm

Hi Bill,

I’ve just posted an article on my blog called ‘There is no First Strike in Karate – the Training’.

It is an examination of technique studies from Mutsu Mizuho’s 1933 “Karate Kenpo”. I consider them a practical example of the training behind ‘Karate Ni Sente Nashi’, ‘There is No First Strike in Karate’. Perhaps you will find it of interest. The article can be found at
http://isshin-concentration.blogspot.co ... arate.html
Victor Smith
bushi no te isshinryu
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Re: There is no First Strike in Karate – the Training’

Postby Bill Glasheen » Sat Jul 16, 2011 1:19 am

I like the progression of techniques shown in that piece of martial literature from reactive to essentially attacking the attack. It makes me ponder whether there can be a yakusoku kumite that works through that progression.

I've found that when you try to do partner exercises with the attack-the-attack mindset, the attacker becomes more and more tentative with each sequence. Pretty soon you have nothing to work with. When trying to demonstrate how many of these techniques work, my students just shut down on me. (Maybe it's my chi!! :mrgreen: ) In any case, it's a reason why we don't see much in the way of these techniques practiced - in spite of the purists arguing that we must evolve to that.

Gary Khoury once asked some of the Okinawan masters why our yakusoku kumite didn't have much in the way of preemptive attacks. The response? "Those kumite would be too short!" :lol:

- Bill
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Re: There is no First Strike in Karate – the Training’

Postby Victor Smith » Sat Jul 16, 2011 5:35 am

Hi Bill,

I have a real affinity to the works written in the 1930's because of the decade of training I received from Tristan Sutrisno who's father trained in Japan during that time, studying Shotokan under Funakoshi Sensei and Aikido under of of Usheiba's students.

Among my earliest studies were techniques described by Mutsu, done as single wazza studies.

I don't recall them during his two person drills, but I am only partially his student.

In my study of Yang tai chi san shou (two person 88) one of the techniques that caught my eye was the defender stepping back drawing the attacker into the space/void created by that action, and that is shades of Mutsu's techniques too.

Somehow I consider single preemptive striking wazza easier for drilling.

Well now back to bed and resting to heal <GRIN>
Victor Smith
bushi no te isshinryu
Victor Smith
 
Posts: 203
Joined: Fri Apr 21, 2006 2:17 am
Location: Derry, NH, USA


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