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PostPosted: Mon Jul 22, 2013 10:15 pm 
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Posts: 2141
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
I agree, the priority of late has generally been on the invasives (a prominent research focus for my School of Natural Resources CALMIT group as well). The full list for that catch-all category should be at the Nebraska Department of Agriculture site (I have not had a chance to look yet).

As for authority, in Nebraska the state has given it to the "primary" cities (i.e. Lincoln and Omaha)
Lincoln Municipal Code wrote:
8.46.010 Owner of Real Estate to Remove Weeds.
It shall be the duty of every owner of real estate in the city to cut and clear, or clear, such real
estate, together with one-half of the streets and alleys abutting thereon, of all weeds or worthless
vegetation whenever such weeds or worthless vegetation shall extend more than six inches above
the ground. Such weeds or worthless vegetation shall be cut so as not to extend more than six inches
above the ground. After cutting, all such weeds or worthless vegetation shall be immediately
removed from such real estate, or be burned upon the premises; provided, however, that if burned
upon the premises, a permit so to do shall first be obtained from the Air Pollution Control Officer
pursuant to Chapter 8.06 of this title. (Ord. 15569 §1; May 14, 1990: P.C. §8.80.010: Ord. 14936
§1; July 25, 1988: prior Ord. 11433 §1; August 18, 1975: Ord. 10926 §1; October 15, 1973: Ord.
3780 §1; November 18, 1940).

ANNOT.: The State has granted the cities of the primary class the right to
require the owners of real estate to destroy weeds and undesirable
vegetation and has made it the duty of the City to do so if the owner
does not.

So as I read it smaller towns and communities that are not "cities of the primary class" would not have the same authorization. Ah federalism, you have to love it...

The courts have ruled that the city cannot be held liable if city employees damage other plants in the process of destroy weeds on private property
Quote:
Greenwood v. City of Lincoln, 156 Neb. 142, 55 N.W.2d 343 (1952)
Such activity is a governmental or public function. Municipal
employees in the performance of such a governmental function
cannot subject the City of Lincoln to liability for the destruction of
plaintiff's raspberry bushes.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2013 2:36 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am
Posts: 17068
Location: Richmond, VA --- Louisville, KY
Wow, Glenn... All that is harsh!

I'm very particular about what I allow on my property. The back of my 1.4 acres runs up against protected wetlands where unique plants and animals thrive. The front is classic suburbia, with every growing condition known to a central Virginia resident (wet, dry, direct sun, full shade, sloped, flat). So I do the following:

  • I protect all native plants on the back half of the property. I thought my brother-in-law was going to have a cow when I told him I wasn't going to thin the woods out. (Neighborhood ordinace says I need permission to do so.) What-ever... not his property.
    ...
  • On the front half I take great care of and pride in my lawn, because it protects sloped land from ending up in the Chesapeake Bay where it can kill the oysters. I overseed with a mixture of at least 3 different fescue seeds every September. (When available, I mix in one species of drought-resistant bluegrass.) That way every part of my property except for a few problem spots has at least *some* variant of grass growing and green 12 months of the year. If you look closely from place to place in my highly variable property, you can see how the texture of the lawn changes quite markedly. From a distance you can't see it.
    ...
  • I do not do all the usual non-native plants that every other west-ender has in their yard. You know... the Crape Myrtles and Bradford Pears and the like. Booorriiiiinnnggg!!!! And it just looks stupid on my property. I've actually let a few volunteer trees grow where the builders did damage to (and ultimately killed) 7 or 8 trees on my property from being bumped or grated over or having roots cut. They grew so fast that you can't tell.
    ...
  • The one exception for non-natives is variants of native plants. So for instance I have Magnolia Virginiana growing wild in the swamp behind my house, and so I planted a much taller Magnolia Virginiana Austrailas in the front. I have several variats of red maple on the property, so I feel justified in planting 2 variations of Japanese Maple (acer palmatum sango kaku, and acer palmatum kaiser).
    ...
  • I have American Holly growing in the back, so I have several cultivar species of holly (male and female) growing in the front that aren't as big and have good berries for the birds.
    ...
  • I have several dogwood (cornus florida) variants on my property (red and white flowered) to match the natives.
    ...
  • Mountain laurels grow nearby in the mountains, so I have a few variants on my property. Those have been the most difficult to take (on an east-facing slope), but I have two live ones now that bloom every spring.
    ...
  • Rhododendrons grow wild in the mountains, so I have the related azaleas on my property (4 different variants).

I rarely use chemicals, although I have to use some pre-emergent, Roundup, and broad leaf weed killer to have a lawn. I also fight a battle with the wiregrass - a relative of Bermuda grass - in a few very hot spots. All I do is pisss it off every August; it comes back every July. And no, I can't just let it grow (Justin). It turns brown on the first frost, and fails to control the erosion. It is most definitely a summer thing.

If someone wants to call any of my stuff weeds, well good luck with that.

Because I almost never use pesticides, I am blessed with a plethora of insect killers. I have *never* seen mosquito larva in the bird bath, even though I have wetlands in the back. Thank you dragonflies, Eastern Phoebee, bats, etc.

- Bill


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2013 4:54 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2001 6:01 am
Posts: 2141
Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Yeah, this agricultural state is serious about its weeds. Although with that said, Lincoln definitely has the strictest weed laws of any community in Nebraska.

Your yard sounds great Bill. If I could I would have a much more natural, diverse yard. Maybe someday when I can get an acreage. Mind you the prairie is not exactly my favorite plantscape so I will wait until I get my PhD and likely move to another state, hopefully east.

One difference I have from my neighbors is I do not like to trim off the lower branches from my trees. I have a crabapple in front of my large front living room window and it has very low branches...provides some challenges for mowing but also provides quite a bit of privacy from neighbors, sidewalk, and road. A side benefit is that in the winter in addition to providing food for birds, snow drifting under the tree often enables the rabbits to be able to reach and feed off of the crabapples on the lowest branches. It's fun to watch them reaching up to get the fruit, not to mention entertains the dog.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 26, 2013 4:37 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2012 10:36 am
Posts: 554
I have some unusual taste in plants, my back garden is very small but used to look like the tropics I had a couple of huge Yukkas and a New Zealand flax at one end and when you looked down the side of my house you could see them, unfortunately a severe winter killed the Yukkas off :cry: .but I've got a couple of Fatsia Japonicas so if anyone gets nasty I can poison them :lol: :lol: and loads of hostas, I love hostas.
I think if you wanted to cause havoc with a country you could attack them with plants, in Wales they have a real problem with Japanese knotweed, and when I grew my own vegetables the allotment that I had ,had a real problem with mares tails........I don't think anything that monsanto can create will kill off Japanese knotweed.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 26, 2013 7:09 pm 
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Location: Lincoln, Nebraska
Kudzu is like that. An ornamental vine from Asia purposefully introduced into the U.S., it thrives in the southeastern U.S. and quickly became an uncontrollable noxious weed. An amazing plant on one hand, but definitely the worst invasive plant species in the U.S.; it grows over anything, even abandoned buildings, as can be seen in these photos.

Image

Image

Image

Image

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Last edited by Glenn on Fri Jul 26, 2013 9:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 26, 2013 7:32 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 21, 2000 6:01 am
Posts: 1348
Location: Somerville, ma.
Japanese knotweed is edible, by the way. Not that I'd encourage it anyway.

http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Plants ... tweed.html

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 26, 2013 8:42 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2012 10:36 am
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I've heard it tastes like apples 8)


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 29, 2013 1:35 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am
Posts: 17068
Location: Richmond, VA --- Louisville, KY
When you rarely use pesticides, Nature loves you.

Other than my dragonfiles (I name them because each has a unique pattern)

Image

Image

I now have one of these on my upstairs bathroom screen, illuminated by the backyard floodlight. Unlike my dragonflies above, this is a picture I pulled off the internet. It's called a Luna Month, and it's obvious why it evolved the way it did. Pretty incredible creatures.

Image


- Bill


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 29, 2013 1:52 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am
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Location: Richmond, VA --- Louisville, KY
Glenn

Here is our own native Virginia Creeper. It's been around for a long time, and isn't quite as invasive as kudzu.

Image

Image

Here is its fall coloring.

Image

Wikipedia wrote:
P. quinquefolia can be used as a shading vine for buildings on masonry walls. Because the vine, like its relative Parthenocissus tricuspidata (Boston ivy), adheres to the surface by disks rather than penetrating roots, it will not harm the masonry but will keep a building cooler by shading the wall surface during the summer, saving money on air conditioning. As with ivy, trying to rip the plant from the wall will damage the surface; but if the plant is first killed, such as by severing the vine from the root, the adhesive pads will eventually deteriorate and release their grip.

Native Americans used the plant as an herbal remedy for diarrhea, difficult urination, swelling, and lockjaw


- Bill


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