Handicap and Kata

Martial Artist get sick, have accidents, become disabled. This forum will focus on how these individuals cope with their condition while staying active in the martial arts and while living life to the fullest. Administered by Sensei Bill Bauknecht. He's been there and doing great! (You don't need to register in order to post here!)

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Handicap and Kata

Postby Bill Bauknecht » Sat Dec 05, 1998 4:30 am

One of the hardest things for me to accept is that I can't "burn" through a kata anymore. Both speed and power have suffered plus the inability to complete certain moves etc. I have discussed this with my teacher, Art Rabesa, you might call it complaining to my teacher. He laughs and tells me how well I am doing and uses the word I should know well, ADAPT. Since I am unable to get into deep stances, supporting leg is unstable, kicks are impossible, and everything has to be in slow motion. This has been very hard for me to accept so I have slacked off and very backward about having anyone see my kata. This is not good and I know it. So I have made up my mind to attend some other classes and "show off" how well I am doing. One thing that I have found is sanchin still feels strong. I know something has been lost but it still hasnt left me completely. Anyone else experiencing similar problems?? I suppose the best thing to look at is at least still being able to do kata, period. I'll get there!!
Bill
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Handicap and Kata

Postby JohnC » Sat Dec 05, 1998 5:42 am

Caddybill:

I was watching kata solos as we all went through our turns. I watched as each level and body type did their kata.

Guys with short arms don't have quite the same graceful angling as those with longer arms. Their sanchin thrusts look different.

Real tall guys have trouble with their moves seeming to be all knees and elbows.

Heavy guys don't quite have the same sweet balance in some of their turns.

Older guys with seasoning have vintage moves that may have lost speed and power, but the life of the kata comes through anyway.

But despite this, you can tell the ones who have worked hard at kata despite their shape or limitation. Somehow they carve out their own movement art and make it still have quality. I would bet that the spirit of the kata reveals itself through you despite the adaption and finds another way shining.


JohnC
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Handicap and Kata

Postby moulton » Sat Dec 05, 1998 4:53 pm

I really want to take a few lessons from Bill.
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Handicap and Kata

Postby Bill Bauknecht » Mon Dec 07, 1998 2:57 am

Hi John,
Thanks for that post. Really I should be able to accept my kata. I have taught enough students to know each is an individual and add something of themselves in each of their kata. I have sat on enough promotion boards, have seen it all. I'm getting my head on straight. Thanks for the help.

Bill
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Handicap and Kata

Postby Bill Bauknecht » Mon Dec 07, 1998 3:00 am

Allen,
Well at least I know I can still teach kata. (grin)
Bill
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Handicap and Kata

Postby Wayne » Mon Dec 07, 1998 4:10 am

Hi Bill, John C. and Al,
I had the pleasure of watching a Shodan promotion demonstration in our dojo yesterday. The discussion as to how well we think we can still perform our kata is relevant to what I saw during this demo.
Three students were going for their shodan. Two of them were relatively young, early thirty-ish, and the third was fifty five. He didn't start training til he was fifty one. All of them performed very well, it sent chills up my spine and I was very proud to see how well they did.
But one noticible difference between the older( ahem.... more mature) student and his younger counterparts was the way he paced himself throughout the test. The young bulls were going 110%. Very powerful but obviously taxing themselves. You could see it in their breathing. Hey, I'm sure they were quite excited. Been there, done it myself. But the older fellow whom I'm sure is much more aware of his physical limitations, showed power where power needed to be seen, reasonable speed, and excellent technique. I was impressed.
I guess this is one aspect of how we customize our individual karate to ourselves. Whether it's age, and old injury that limits the range of movement, or any other gamut of things that change our bodies, we can still find ways to make our karate effective.
Here's to aging gracefully!<G>
Wayne
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Handicap and Kata

Postby moulton » Mon Dec 07, 1998 3:05 pm

Bill.

I need directions.

Allen
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Handicap and Kata

Postby Bill Bauknecht » Tue Dec 08, 1998 2:16 am

Wayne,
Thanks for passing on your observations. It reminded me of the old story we have all heard about the old bull and the young bull up on the hill with the herd of young ladies down the hill. What you saw, I think applies to many different situations. As one grows older we learn to adapt, to do the best we can do with what we have. When we are young we very often take what we have and do not give it our best. I think the key is to just do the best you can. No one, especially oneself should ask for or expect anything more. So why do we???
Bill
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Handicap and Kata

Postby Bill Bauknecht » Tue Dec 08, 1998 2:22 am

Allen,
Whenever you are ready let's see when is a good evening for both of us.
Bill
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Handicap and Kata

Postby moulton » Tue Dec 08, 1998 12:04 pm

Anytime, Bill. Let's continue this cyber-conversation offline. Allen
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Handicap and Kata

Postby JohnC » Wed Dec 09, 1998 3:21 am

Caddybill:

I don't want to intrude on your personal situation, but just some thoughts that came to me after reading your latest reply to my post:

While I do not know the details of your disability, is it possible to update your attending physicians about these particular kinesthetic limitations and see if they can recommend a procedure, prosthetic device, orthotic brace, exercise physiologist or other intervention that might give you greater functional capacity of the lower limbs?

If not, is it possible to create your own version of the kata that comes the closest to fulfilling your current residual functional capacities? Perhaps working with someone who has overcome physical challenges to figure other movement dynamics that can mask your limitations and show off your strengths?

It's important to carve out a niche in the dojo for those of us with special needs.

Keep on trainin' !


JohnC





[This message has been edited by JohnC (edited 12-08-98).]

[This message has been edited by JohnC (edited 12-08-98).]
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Handicap and Kata

Postby Bill Bauknecht » Fri Dec 11, 1998 2:42 am

Hi John,
Unfortunitly I'm stuck with what I got. A monster myeloma tumor ate away a good portion of my left pelvic bone and I have bone cancer. My mobility is pretty good now but I have to watch twisting, moving too fast and I have to avoid contact or will start breaking bones. I can do kata but at my own speed and with a lot of variation of speeds and changes in certain moves. I'm thinking of calling it the billy boy wiggle. lol. I think I am getting my mind working here and will be able to put together a reasonably good kata. Thanks for you help, appreciate your suggestions.
Bill
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