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 Post subject: To Any Athlete
PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2000 3:38 am 
I have had this on my desk for many years. If you have read Grantland Rice I'm sure you will recognize it. If you have not read Grantland Rice, and you are old enough, you will recognize the words.

TO ANY ATHLETE
By Grantland Rice

Why is it each is the last to find
That his legs are gone-that his eyes are bad,
That the quicker reflexes have left his mind,
That he hasn't the stuff that he one day had,
That lost youth mocks, and he doesn't see,
The ghost of the fellow that used to be?

How can they slip from the heights so far,
And never know that the day has gone
When their eyes were fixed on a rising star
With a firm foundation to stand upon?
How can they slip as the comets fall
And read no writing upon the wall?

Caught by a stride which they used to beat-
Nailed by a punch that they used to block-
Trailing the flurry of flying feet,
But dreaming still of the peaks that mock-
Each is the last to learn from fate
That his story is finished-and out of date!

I'll also add, "The older we get, the better we were."

Bill


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 Post subject: To Any Athlete
PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2000 2:54 pm 
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Location: Mount Dora, Florida
A "Keeper", Bill. Thanks for sharing it with us.

In most of our forum topics and discussions, we assume everyone is in their 'prime' and able to be the perfect warrior. Living in those ivory towers, we tend to look at our martial arts in a very limited way.

One of the reasons Uechi-ryu survives as a 'lifetime' activity, is that most teachers understand that students have a limited window of opportunity for being the toughest dude in the dojo. . . and of course, there is only room for a couple. . . And realizing that Uechi-ryu is for everyone, keeps students coming back and continuing to train. In some styles/dojo, where the attitude is more elitist, only the young and strong remain. The rest retreat, believing they have failed or that they don't have the ability, skill whatever. Others compromise by searching out 'soft' styles, where the physical demands are more realistic.

Something to think about. . .



------------------
GEM


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 Post subject: To Any Athlete
PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2000 7:30 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 18, 1998 6:01 am
Posts: 619
Since July of this year, I have not been able to train in karate. First I was bit by a tick and then had swollen glands and a fever for over 6 weeks. During that time, I slept constantly and was unable to walk without a great deal of pain. The first doctor ruled out Lyme Disease because I live in a "non-Lyme" state and thought because I did karate I had "pulled something." The second doctor also ruled out Lyme Disease, ordered blood tests and x-rays and pronounced me with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Fibromyalgia compounded by an arthritic knee. Finally I was put on painkillers (after 8 weeks of agony).

I just went to another Doctor (this time an orthopedic surgeon) because, although I can walk relatively pain free again (though not very far), I'm still troubled by aches/pains and have no lateral movements and can barely do a Sanchin. I feel like a white belt again. This physician believes it may be Lyme Disease compounded by Osteoarthritis or vice versa, ordered more blood tests, put me on an Antibiotic and recommended physical therapy to see if my knee could be rehabilitated without drastic measures such as surgery.

Sorry getting to the point is so long, but I wanted to give you some background (and believe me, there are a lot more details than I shared) first.

In reading an article on Osteoarthritis, I found that it's not rare for otherwise healthy women in their 40s and 50s to develop OA. The question is how old a woman's joints are compared with the rest of her. Years of exercising, as much as it improves a woman's cardiovascular health, can cause wear and tear to joints; depending on the sport a woman plays, she could have knees that act more like a 40-year-old's in a 20-year-old's body.

Anatomically, women are more susceptible to OA. We have wider hips than men do, which focuses more pressure on the knee and makes women more vulnerable to tears of the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament), a ligament that stabilizes the knee joint. This injury often leads to OA.

"But noncompetitive sports such as running, jogging, and high-impact aerobics also can take a toll, particularly if a woman's hips and knees are not well-aligned," according to Wendy Katzman, a clinical instructor of physical therapy at the University of California-San Francisco. Even a slight case of flat feet -- in which feet turn inward instead of pointing straight ahead and in a direct line downward from the hips -- can increase the amount of stress on a woman's knees, Katzman says, leading to arthritis later in life.

I post this because I feel that perhaps my over-emphasizing the Sanchin 45-degree angle and incorrectly aligned low stances over the years may have contributed to my present condition.

Where my injury/disease showed up was also after a particularly strenuous session of Sanchin - Seisan - Sanseiryu. Pushing off my right leg to execute movement into the opposite direction had been painful. But, I took ibuprofen to get me through.

So, I encourage all to pay attention to your body. If it hurts, don't do it. Women especially, forget about not looking tough enough or measuring up. And, find ways to develop your lower back muscles and quadriceps. The pain of this past few months has taught me a huge lesson.

For now, I attend class to do my 3 Sanchins and maybe 1 or Kanshiwas (can't do anything more difficult at the moment) and sit it a chair for the remainder of the class to help people with their kata. Thank goodness our dojo now has 5 more black belts to assist our Sensei.

It's hard watching … I know where my levels were. I get frustrated to think that perhaps I may not be able to do our style the way I feel it inside again. I get to thinking, maybe I should learn some soft Tai Chi.

Very timely poem, Bill … very timely thoughts, George.

------------------
In Beauty,

Jackie

[This message has been edited by Jackie Olsen (edited October 26, 2000).]


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 Post subject: To Any Athlete
PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2000 11:20 pm 
Jackie that is some great information, especially for our female participants. There is some good advice for all here, the "listen to your body" thing is one I think we martial artist ignore a lot of times. And Jackie, about your condition, all I can say to you is that if they are still unsure of your problem, keep moving until you find the doctor who nails it. Again using myself as an example, they fiddled around with me for over a year before finding out the real problem. Through all that pain, therapy etc etc., one year of it, they found the real problem. By then, well the rest is history. I'm sure your problem is not that type. BUT, don't settle for anything less than a downright final diagnosis and get the proper treatment from there. Therapy is good as long as it is for the right thing. Therapy can do more harm than good if it's for the wrong thing. I know. Good luck.
Bill


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 Post subject: To Any Athlete
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2000 12:05 am 
I feel bad for you, Jackie. What can you do, if anything to repair the damage?

Bill, take care and I hope you are doing ok these days, too, my friend.


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 Post subject: To Any Athlete
PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2000 1:47 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 18, 1998 6:01 am
Posts: 619
Bill,

Thanks for your support and encouragement to keep on going until I get a clear diagnosis and the right treatment. It's been so frustrating, as I know you understand and have experienced yourself.

Allen ... as I understand it, once the cartilage is damaged or broken down there's not a whole lot to do to repair it. We've discussed treatments such as injections of a Chicken's Comb (can't think of the medical name -- would that mean I woud have chicken legs Image?), but that doesn't sound right at present. (50% success rate ... treatment's only been out 4 years)

Surgery to pop the knee back out, pins, etc. would put me out of commission for about a year. He cited a 60% success rate with my knee.

As for the other symptoms, if I do have Lyme's, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or Fibro... they either run their course, respond to times of stress or may disappear as suddenly as they appeared. I've increased my sitting meditation and have been allowing myself to nap and not do anything more than I have to.
I've changed my diet to more veggies and protein and have noticed that I feel better with those types of food. For some reason, I seem to be craving steak... I've never been a beef person before!

Any way ... thanks to all for your thoughts and support and for the private Emails, too. I will keep you updated ... and remember, do that Sanchin as if it's the last you may ever do again...


------------------
In Beauty,

Jackie

[This message has been edited by Jackie Olsen (edited October 27, 2000).]


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 Post subject: To Any Athlete
PostPosted: Sat Oct 28, 2000 1:18 pm 
The Bionic Man

I know someone who had one knee replaced last year and is going to have another one done. He works on roofs, which kept him off the job for six months, and he is only holding out for the other knee replacement to replenish funds.

He said having his knee replaced was the best thing he ever did.

I successfully evaded hip replacement last November; first was going to be the right, then the left, and during those dark months, found out these replacements are truly miracles of science and modern day medicine.

It all depends upon the individual, what is replaced, how the recovery goes, etc., but you could be out of work for as little as three months.

I don't want to make it sound better than it is, nor do I know your circumstances Jackie, but if you are currently enduring a lot of pain keep searching for answers.


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Allen, Home: http://www.ury2k.com/pulse mirror: http://home.ici.net/~uechi/

[This message has been edited by Allen M. (edited October 28, 2000).]


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 Post subject: To Any Athlete
PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 2000 9:37 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 18, 1998 6:01 am
Posts: 619
Thanks Allen,

For the "bionic" viewpoint. Yes, I'll keep searching. I'm hoping to be hired by the company I work with in the next 3-6 months, so I'll have some insurance to fall back on.

Right now, alternative care (massage therapy and "soft" physical therapy, Reiki, etc.) administered by caring friends help much in relieving the pain. And I'm sure I haven't found the right doctor yet, which will make a difference, too, in treatment.

Thanks for the thoughts ... hope you're doing well.

------------------
In Beauty,

Jackie


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