Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

Moderator: Van Canna

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Nov 19, 2017 2:01 pm

There is no reason why a martial arts student can't know this as thoroughly as I did. For that matter, there really isn't a good excuse for anyone who bills himself as a self-defense instructor not knowing this stuff.
RM
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 46378
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Nov 19, 2017 2:43 pm

This is a sobering post


Teaching for Chaos

What I teach is dealing with violence, and that dictates a lot of what and how and who I teach.

I don't teach most people. Children don't need to know about certain parts of the world. They need to believe, at some level, that the world is safe and good. Maybe it's not true and maybe it's not necessary, but I want children to have that.

I don't teach stupid people. They make me tired and waste my time. I try to avoid the ones who are just augmenting fantasy or on some kind of imaginary power rush, since I can't hide the contempt for any length of time.


So who I do teach tends to break one of two ways- either professionals who expect to be dealing with very bad things in the near future or hobbyists (experienced martial artists) who are just now realizing that what they thought they were learning might not actually be what they learned.

They are waking up in other words, pushing away the dream violence and looking for a touch of the real.
RM
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 46378
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Nov 19, 2017 2:46 pm

More buckets of ice cold water...

What I teach is chaos, and so in the end, I teach nothing. I mean that very seriously.

When the sh*it hits the fan you will be all alone, no matter how many people you are with. No matter how good or extensive your scenario training it will never be exactly like real life.

You (or the student) need to be able to handle it. Alone. Not like me, you need to handle it like you. So I make no effort to teach my way. You find your way.

And then you build on it and refine it and broaden and deepen it. You do that until you have achieved something I could never give you. At best, if I tried to teach you, you would be an imperfect me. But you can be a perfect you.

So I don't teach. We explore and I point out what I see and you tell me what you sense.

That's the essence because in a moment of survival, you will be a perfect expression of yourself. Who you are and what you do, both in that moment and in all the hours of training beforehand are who you are.

Who you have become. Nothing less and nothing more.
RM
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 46378
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Nov 19, 2017 2:49 pm

That's the essence because in a moment of survival, you will be a perfect expression of yourself. Who you are and what you do, both in that moment and in all the hours of training beforehand are who you are.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 46378
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Nov 19, 2017 2:53 pm

I can't teach them platitudes, "You will get cut" or "You won't get cut" because both can be lies and they don't need garbage in their brains when they see their own blood. They need to move.

It's all about the student and they need to learn to see and evaluate and move.

They need to learn how to grow themselves. In the end, they learn how to teach themselves.

Then they do and should move beyond the teacher, not as little flawed clones but as men and women who have grown themselves to be as strong and good and courageous as they can be.

Powerful enough to be themselves, even when they are all alone and afraid.
RM
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 46378
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Nov 19, 2017 2:59 pm

The way we train?

TRAINING DRILLS TO PREPARE FOR THE WORST by RORY MILLER... The speed and brutality of a predatory attack can shock even an experienced martial artist.

The sudden chaos, the cascade of stress hormones-you feel as though time slows down. In reality, the assault is over in an instant. How does anyone prepare for that? ..."You don't get to pick where fights go," Miller says. That's why he has created a series of drills to train you for the worst of it, that will challenge you in ways that mere physical training does not.

You will defend yourself on your feet, on the ground, against weapons, in a crowd, and while blindfolded. You will reevaluate your training scenarios-keeping what works, discarding what does not, and improving your chances of survival.... As a former corrections sergeant and tactical team leader, RORY MILLER is a proven survivor.

He instructs police and corrections professionals who need techniques that work and unflinching courage.... In DRILLS - Training for Sudden Violence, Miller gives you the tools to prepare and prevail, both physically and psychologically. He shares hard-won lessons from a world most of us hope we never experience....

Train fundamentals, combat drills, and dynamic fighting... Develop situational awareness... Condition yourself through stress inoculation... Take a critical look at your training habits... Stalking... Escape and evasion...

The predator mind... Personal threat assessment... This is a fight for your life, and it won't happen on a nice soft mat. It will get, as Miller says, "all kinds of messy." Training for Sudden Violence 2-DVD set, prepares you for that mess.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 46378
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Nov 19, 2017 11:01 pm

Some people, when they start to teach or put on a blackbelt and get in front of a class undergo a personality change because they finally have the confidence (really the self-perception of power/authority) to start acting in ways that they were afraid to do before. Almost always negative.
RM
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 46378
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 20, 2017 12:08 am

A good teacher changes strategies based on what is working for the student. This is a huge step in maturity. The focus, for the first time, is outside of the communicator and monitoring the receiver. This is big and basic.

The instant that you grasp that your attempts to communicate are about the receiver, not about you, your ability to communicate- to write and speak and, I don't know, interpretive dance- all jump to another level.

Not automatically, it takes skill and practice, but the potential to improve jumps by an order of magnitude.
RM
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 46378
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 20, 2017 12:10 am

The next step, with experience, is to plan the communication with the student in mind and from the student's point of view from the very beginning.

It is still about the student, but now trying to plan rather than getting steered by trial-and-error.

You will make errors, though, so you have to keep monitoring.

Otherwise, it is about you even when you are pretending it is about the student.
RM
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 46378
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 20, 2017 12:19 am

But do you see it? There is size, strength, skill, speed and ruthlessness… but there is also an ability to take this conflict to a level that the other party isn’t prepared for.

You want to chip your teeth and try to intimidate and I’m willing to put you face down in the concrete… who is going to win? Still want to play? You want to push and shove and I want to break bones and joints? You want a good old-fashioned fistfight and the knife appears in my hand?

Achilles and Hector- Hector was a good, noble man, possibly the best human being in the Iliad, and he was willing to kill, to risk his life and fight to the death. Achilles wanted to humiliate Hector’s dead body and drag it around the walls of Troy. Who won?
RM
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 46378
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 20, 2017 5:59 am

One of the difficult issues with violence as a study is that relatively few people have extensive experience. Of those, even fewer have the drive to analyze what they have experienced. That leaves small numbers, widely scattered, trying to figure things out alone. That, in turn, means that each of us create our own private language.
RM
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 46378
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 20, 2017 7:11 am

People who train live are shocked by how much doesn't work when they meet resistance for the first time.

People who are used to a certain level of resistance (the level approved and considered safe in their classes) are often helpless the first time they meet high-level resistance, like in a MMA match or serious class.

It is just as big a gap going from 'fully resisting' to surviving an assault. The mental/emotional difference and the technical difference, literally what works and what doesn't, is just as big between being on the receiving end of an assault and 'full resistance' as 'full resistance' is from complete non-contact.
RM
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 46378
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 20, 2017 7:18 am

The Myth of the Fully Resisting Opponent

This is something I wrote some time ago, in response to a specific statement. It came up again on the last post, so I thought some clarification was in order. There has been some slight editing fromn the original version.

Van's forum is all about facing up to the flaws in our beliefs, the things that we think are true that may have a cost when things go bad. We are popping the myths that we create about ourselves and our training.

I submit that if you have never had anyone try to gouge your eyes out to escape from a rear naked strangle, you've never tried the technique against a "fully resisting opponent". The first time, I let go of the strangle to protect my eyes. The second time, I knew better. (Edit- but one eye is still blurry almost twenty years later. From that eye gouge or the one four years later? Not sure.)

If you've never cranked on the technique so hard and fast that you heard a "crack" from his throat, you were playing a gentleman's game, politely.

In the time it takes to put someone in a juji gatame and start to yell "Back off or I'll break his arm!" You can easily be kicked in the head three times. Maybe more. I remember the first three pretty well.

If you've feel you've hit a real opponent as hard as you can hit, take the gloves off and try again. I've known people with shattered hands to keep punching, and people with broken skulls to keep fighting.

RM
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 46378
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 20, 2017 7:20 am

I avoid the threads on "Uechi pointy things" (Edit, and what really brought this subject up- someone was claiming that eye gouges and throat spears weren't allowed in his particular brand of ultimate, anything goes, cage fighting because they either didn't work or were too hard to execute.)

because I don't know enough about Uechi to contribute.

But I have once used a spear hand to the throat. It was easy. It didn't require me to practice magic or have faith in untested complex precision techniques. It left a man who outweighed me by over a hundred pounds on his knees trying to scream and making no sound. That image still bothers me.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 46378
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 20, 2017 7:24 am

Glitches and Denial

Since we're talking about catastrophic failures...

A little background: With the exception of rookie officers I rarely teach rank beginners. At the occasional seminar there will be some new people and sometimes I'll do a hands-on class for non-martial artists. The awareness-based paradigm works pretty well for that, so it's okay. But most of the people I work with already know how to move and how to fight. They have the skill.

What usually happens is that we wind up fishing for glitches. Expose him or her to the common attacks and see if they are still on familiar territory.

Show ranges of intensity and power and mindsets and see if they panic or choke.

Increase the complexity- of terrain, of number and type of threats, of weapons.

Hold them to legal standards. Let them deal with darkness and slippery stuff.

When they choke- and sometimes it is just a fraction of a second of hesitation or a tightening around the eyes- we work on that, dig it out, see what it is and where it came from.

Then we see if it can be dispelled or must be worked around.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 46378
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

PreviousNext

Return to Van Canna's Self Defense Realities

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Exabot [Bot] and 3 guests