Good talk on blocks

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Dec 11, 2017 3:20 pm

Also, courage.
Also, courage. Courage can be tough to define beyond 'acting despite fear' but I mean a special kind.

I mean the confidence to know that you can and will recover from fuk-ups.

We all make mistakes all the time.

When you are afraid of mistakes or the consequences of those mistakes, you hesitate.

When you deeply believe that you can and will recover, making mistakes is less a thing to be feared and thus not worth hesitating over.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Dec 11, 2017 5:03 pm

To prevent others from deciding can be a long-term or short-term route. Long term, if you have the right relationship, you can induce learned helplessness either globally or in a particular field.

When someone gets punished no matter what they do, the only intelligent strategy is to do nothing. That induced passivity is called “Learned Helplessness.”

If you correct your students no matter what they do, you are inducing helplessness in that particular field.

If you are in a relationship where you are wrong no matter what you do, you are being groomed for helplessness.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Dec 11, 2017 5:05 pm

Recognition of available time[b]
(what Gordon Graham calls “Discretionary time”) is a secondary skill that plays a powerful part in the O/D stages. When people envision applying Boyd’s work, they often focus on speeding up the loop, “getting inside the opponent’s loop.”

Sometimes recognizing that there is no immediate need to act is a super-power.

While others are frantically trying to respond, you can gather information and resources and make a better plan.

Often, if your calmness is hard to read, it will invoke rash action in the threat.

[b]Always let your enemies make mistakes if they are inclined to do so.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Dec 11, 2017 10:42 pm

Efficient action hinges on having a broad range of applicable skills that you have tested. Ideally skills you have tested to the extent that your lizard, monkey and human brains all trust the skills.

It doesn’t hurt to make a habit of decisive action, either.

The reversal. You can deny the opponent’s ability to act by controlling his avenues of movement, filling the space either he or his attacks must move through, by physically disrupting his ability to act (injury, handcuffing, etc.) by disrupting his base mentally or physically, by blocking his access to resources (tools, funds, people, advice, information…)
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Dec 12, 2017 5:09 am

Poker

In poker, you can play the cards, the opponent, or the table. Same in life. Or fighting. Or whatever.

Playing the cards. There are four suits and thirteen of each type of card in a deck.

If you have four cards that make a straight, the odds of getting one of the cards that will end it is slightly higher than 2/13.

Trying to fill an inside straight? 1/13.

Need one card for your flush? Instinct says it should be a 1/4 chance of drawing the right card, but you already have 4 of the 13 cards in your suit, so 9/52.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Dec 12, 2017 5:13 am

The life or fighting equivalent is playing from your own skillset. To go into a situation, counting solely on what you know, ignoring other information.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Dec 12, 2017 5:15 am

Playing the opponent.
In poker this is reading tells, getting to know the other players so well that you can read how strong their hands are.

You can read what they desire and what they fear. You can read the draw (a draw of 2 cards in 5-card draw usually indicates they are holding three of a kind, for example).
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Dec 12, 2017 5:17 am

The fighting equivalent.
From Maija Soderholm I got exposed to the late Sonny Umpad's exhortation to first learn to read your enemy, then learn to write him. This one is deep.

It ranges from simply feinting to gather information or to draw a response; to getting so far inside a threat's head that you are effectively gas lighting the threat.

You can control not only what they perceive, but how they interpret their own perception and whether they can trust their own perception.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Dec 12, 2017 5:20 am

Same in life.
If you understand people and can read them, you can use those insights to manipulate them. You can control the game.

A lot of people glitch on this. "Manipulate" has negative connotations in current usage.

But really, manipulation is just acting with skill. I'd rather have good people be skillful than not.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Dec 12, 2017 5:22 am

Playing the table.
Too many people who play cards just play their own.

In stud, you can calculate how the cards showing change your odds. Need a jack? 1/13 chance... but if two jacks are showing, it's now 1/26.

If all of the fives and tens are showing, you'll never fill any straight.

(note: in this post I'm not talking about Hold 'em. Talking about what my dad would call "real poker"-- draw and stud.)
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Dec 12, 2017 5:23 am

To me, in fighting, playing the tables working all the auxiliary stuff-- environmental fighting, accessing social possibilities. The asymmetrical battle of bringing in the law or HR when it suits you.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Dec 12, 2017 5:24 am

Tying it back to game theory.
To be successful you have to know yourself. Your mind, your resources (including skills) your goals and your parameters.

You also need enough empathy to get into your opponent's head and discern the same things from the other point of view.

To approach expertise in the subject, you have to understand how all of the seemingly extraneous stuff interrelates-- the social dynamics, environment, physical and communication skills... the whole bit.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Dec 12, 2017 2:35 pm

This came up a lot at VioDy. Randy had added one when he was teaching Context of Violence:

Acquiesce. In that context, it can be seen as four options. You can choose to try to escape, to try to disable, to try to control or to just go along with the bad guy's program.

That's a legitimate choice, too. If you have made that choice, you made it with the information you had in the moment and that was the option that seemed to have the best ending.

If you are reading this now, it worked. It might have sucked but you are alive. It worked. Never let any armchair quarterback tell you that you survived wrong.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Dec 12, 2017 2:40 pm

Those are four options, but I'm going back to the three original goals. Said earlier that the mindsets, the tactics, the techniques and even the physics are different, and largely incompatible, between the three.

One example, and because we're talking about energy and physics, it might earn the label esoterica.

In all but a very few cases, if you want to disable someone, you need to direct kinetic energy towards his core.

Mass and structure both act as tamping (just like when setting up explosives) and more damage happens.

If you punch into a threat so that the force is going away from his centerline, the force bounces off.

If you strike into weak structure, the structure gives and your force goes into motion, not damage.

To do damage you strike into the threat's mass and structure. (Except for rotational damage, breaking the twigs or sprinting into the base, but even those have an element...)
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Dec 12, 2017 2:41 pm

So for disabling, your force generally needs to go towards the centerline of the opponent. That is the one direction that your energy can't go for escape.

There are exceptions for this, too (some wedging and back-whip power generation) but escape requires putting kinetic energy into the empty space.

In other words, you don't run directly into the bad guy, because that would obviously be stupid.
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