Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

Moderator: Van Canna

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby paulg » Mon Jul 16, 2018 11:25 am

This morning's television news included a clip of a store manager calling police on a customer he was having a disagreement with. (never mind the nature of the argument). It was not violent. There were no threats. Not even yelling or swearing. But you can clearly see the store manager trembling dramatically while he tries to talk on the phone with the police. This is a good example of how an adrenaline dump occurs even in a relatively mild confrontation. And as you have quoted above, dexterity and coordination are completely and immediately lost. The idea of being relaxed and soft and as focused and peaceful as a zen master contemplating a lotus blossom needs serious reconsideration. I am with the neuropsychologist quoted above who points out that emotional and neurophysical responses happen almost instantaneously and then our conscious and cognitive reaction follows. In a situation where you have some time to try to settle down (say, in an argument that has not reached the level of physical blows)a trained person may have the chance to settle himself down, at least partially (I think of Master Tomoyose telling us 'pull the shoulders down and take a couple of deep breaths'). The Zen calming may come later; the next day or when you get home, when you work to restore your mental balance by going through your sanchin. I hesitate to use the work 'therapeutic', because it sounds so hokey, but there is that element to our workouts. That is; we reassure ourselves again and again "I am calm. I am not afraid. I can protect myself. I am safe... I am safe... I am safe."
paulg
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2018 11:26 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 16, 2018 6:33 pm

Good post Paul.

1.
But you can clearly see the store manager trembling dramatically while he tries to talk on the phone with the police. This is a good example of how an adrenaline dump occurs even in a relatively mild confrontation.


He would probably respond the same way even with martial arts training. Also we don't know what 'image' his subconscious was perceiving of the man arguing with him. This is what down the line actually controls the confrontation...the type of opponent facing you and his verbal assaults upon the psyche.

Where martial arts practitioners fail, as Rory points out, is where they really start believing that their training will achieve 'stoppage' of any type of assailant.

No matter how tough they might think they are, or how hard they can hit...average karate students we have in class...will not achieve any opponents stoppage ... especially when opponents are also under an extreme adrenaline dump.

And down deep inside students know this, and when the time comes, like in the situation above, they are very much affected.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 51605
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 16, 2018 6:40 pm

2.
And as you have quoted above, dexterity and coordination are completely and immediately lost. The idea of being relaxed and soft and as focused and peaceful as a zen master contemplating a lotus blossom needs serious reconsideration.

I am with the neuropsychologist quoted above who points out that emotional and neurophysical responses happen almost instantaneously and then our conscious and cognitive reaction follows.


https://www.amazon.com/Sharpening-Warri ... B00FFBIK2Y

In this book, which I evaluated on my forum in great detail years back, is very clear on the studies made on what you write, Paul, and a classic as to the science of training.

I urge people to educate themselves by reading it. There is much to learn there that would make any of us better students and better teachers.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 51605
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 16, 2018 6:59 pm

3.
I hesitate to use the work 'therapeutic', because it sounds so hokey, but there is that element to our workouts. That is; we reassure ourselves again and again "I am calm. I am not afraid. I can protect myself. I am safe... I am safe... I am safe."


This is an excellent method, almost like self hypnosis, that goes to 'mind state' control, but hopefully one that does not work to exacerbate the arrogance of some martial artists who think they can overcome any opponent, the 'bring them on' chronic disease.

I have a cure for this disease....'just tell the tough guy inside that 'Tank abbot'
is about to take you on in five minutes as you walk from the dojo to your car'

Image

And there are people like him walking around looking for a fight.

Like the fighter who had his throat cut by the Jamaican gangbanger, did not think he had much to worry because of his training and tournament fighting.

There is no such thing as being safe from 'Violence'
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 51605
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 16, 2018 8:26 pm

Effects of an adrenaline dump on stamina

AlanL »

After the Multiple Assailant weekend it became very obvious that while highly adrenalized 30-45 seconds of a full blown fight was about all anyone can handle regardless of aerobic conditioning, ability to spar a few rounds or completing intensive karate classes.

Adrenaline will steal your stamina as well as all the other things we have discussed here. Exploding with vicious adrenaline charged power shots to end it quickly is your best hope for survival.

I asked Bill Kipp about the effects of adrenaline on stamina and here is his response.

“Hi Alan! I hope you have recovered from the wild weekend! As you experienced, adrenaline and stress absolutely affect stamina. Most of the real fights I have encountered were over in a few seconds, and I was totally exhausted.

In FAST Defense a typical fight is from 10-15 seconds, and the combatants are pretty shot when its over. Bear in mind too that we are cheating like crazy in the suits and lasting longer than most opponents would be able to do.

Its also my experience though that in real fights, most people are not able to hit very hard because they have never trained to use the adrenaline stress rush as their allies.

Often time people don't even get seriously hurt in a real fight unless they fall into a sharp object or the like. This allows fights to go a bit longer as no-one is taking shots like the ones you and the other students were throwing at us Bulletmen.

Cheers,
Bill K “

Alan
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 51605
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 16, 2018 8:30 pm

Well Here is something else the practitioners don't seem to get.

For example: you never hear in a Uechi class about how long you are expected to last in a street fight when hit by an adrenaline dump, you know the kind that you don't think applies to you because of the 'way you train' but has sneaked up on you like a python snake which is constricting you without you even realizing it.

Being in good shape of course helps but the difference is that under adrenaline charge....you go 'hormonal' whereas in class or even tournament sparring, you don't.

Not many understand the difference, Jim Maloney and me learned this the hard way under the teachings of Mas Ayoob and John Farnam in the duelatron scenario in NH with loaded .45 pistols.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 51605
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 16, 2018 8:37 pm

We have discussed this aspect of the “dump” before on these pages related to the fight or flight response.

Man’s “internal programming” evolved and continue to evolve slowly over time, much more slowly than “technique”_

We are still programmed to face up to primitive challenges in man’s primitive times: Hunting, tribal wars, natural catastrophes.

In these situations large amounts of adrenaline come into play when the central nervous system adapts to the emergency at hand.

At once the body responds with fight or flight kicking us into turbo drive with a great consumption of physical energy that burns the hormones and glucose put into circulation in the blood to confront the danger.

The turbo effect does not last long, and the tremendous energy consumption seems to go on whether we act forcefully or merely spin our wheels.

The fatigue factor is real and is upon you fast.

The antidote is to explode, matching the initial rush__ before beginning to go limp.


So all this 'softness/relaxation' we teach doesn't really play out with our body makeup.

As Bill Kipp stated you will enlist the adrenaline dump as an ally in making you hit harder to begin with.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 51605
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 16, 2018 8:38 pm

AlanL »

The last fight of the weekend was 3 bulletmen attack on the ground.

This is where the stamina loss was most noticed by me. When the attack was going on and I was on the ground it seemed to last forever and I felt if I don't get up soon I'll be in trouble.

By the time I did get up my last few strikes didn't have much on them due to total exhaustion.

Watching the tape after the whole encounter was maybe 30 seconds. It felt like several minutes!

Alan
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 51605
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 16, 2018 8:41 pm

The fatigue factor is a real killer especially if you are overweight. /Before you know you can't breathe and just flail your arms like a puppet.

And in case you may think you only need one of your killer techniques to stop the fight, you need to stop dreaming...ask Rory Miller about his prison fights.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 51605
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Dgharkins » Mon Jul 16, 2018 9:53 pm

Or our Carlo C .. looks familiar.

Van Canna wrote:3.
I hesitate to use the work 'therapeutic', because it sounds so hokey, but there is that element to our workouts. That is; we reassure ourselves again and again "I am calm. I am not afraid. I can protect myself. I am safe... I am safe... I am safe."


This is an excellent method, almost like self hypnosis, that goes to 'mind state' control, but hopefully one that does not work to exacerbate the arrogance of some martial artists who think they can overcome any opponent, the 'bring them on' chronic disease.

I have a cure for this disease....'just tell the tough guy inside that 'Tank abbot'
is about to take you on in five minutes as you walk from the dojo to your car'

Image

And there are people like him walking around looking for a fight.

Like the fighter who had his throat cut by the Jamaican gangbanger, did not think he had much to worry because of his training and tournament fighting.

There is no such thing as being safe from 'Violence'
Dennis
Dgharkins
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Sun Mar 15, 2015 8:22 pm
Location: Shinkookai, W Bridgewater

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:40 pm

Hi Dennis,

Right on. Carlo C. of our Bridgewater power team is one good example of some karate guy's worst nightmare. Of course we won't go on line with what some people experienced when they tried to take him on...but those people, fortunately still alive, will have been sobered up for a lifetime to come.

Another good example as I use Carlo's ungodly power to demonstrate the fallacy of 'blocking' punches from someone a Uechi practitioner has no business trying to block without moving off line at the same time and using the 'block' more like a parry redirection.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 51605
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:50 pm

I am a member of CCW-SAFE ....a legal service [insurance] that will respond with a legal team to defend a member should he be charged both civilly and criminally in a self defense situation, while using any weapon, including empty hands.

Membership there is a lifeline in a total chaos situation you will find yourself while defending yourself.

This is what they write:

7 Steps To Avoid A Deadly Encounter

By Stan Campbell | July 16th, 2018

Stan Campbell, Co- Founder and COO of CCW Safe, talks about 7 tips when trying to de-escalate a situation. Stan was a police officer for over 20 years, and has trained over 4000 officers and citizens as an instructor in self defense, use of force and de-escalation techniques.

Recently CCW Safe released a new course “The Art of De-escalation” “The Art of De-escalation” which is an introduction to understanding what it is and some simple tips that can be used to resolve an encounter with another that has moved into conflict.

We are not advising you not to do everything in your power to save your life, or the life of another person. DO NOT compromise your safety, and DO use legal force to stop any lethal threat against you.

Our staff at CCW Safe has over 75 years of police experience collectively and have all been involved in hundreds of violent encounters. A few of us, in a police capacity, were forced to use deadly force and were unsuccessfully sued for our lawful actions.

Although those instances were unavoidable, we have all over the past 20 years employed techniques daily to prevent being the cause of a deadly encounter. And in our collective experience, those who are best trained and are most comfortable in their abilities, use less force and do not launch themselves into unnecessary deadly encounters.

In continuing to help make our members be their own risk managers we wanted to introduce “7 Tips to Prevent a Deadly Encounter.”
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 51605
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:53 pm

1. Avoidance is the best way to stay out of harms way. Many experts present situational awareness as the first step yet we have found if you take the time to identify and avoid high crime areas you are ahead of the game. In our course, our CEO Mike Darter goes into detail about this and presents a few tools you can use to identify these areas in your city or while traveling.


2. Think like a cop and mentally practice for deadly encounters. One of the techniques discussed in the police academy and practiced in patrol is mentally preparing yourself for successful deadly encounters.

And what is meant by that is working through scenarios in your mind of an attack or an escalated situation where you make decisions that are tactically sound and mentally go through the motions of finding cover and getting to your weapon.

You should use this technique first placing yourself in known places you actually frequent. It would help to do this in real time as you park in a location and just go over the “What if” incident and use positive thoughts to make sure you win.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 51605
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:54 pm

3. Positioning is the key in tactics. As a member of SWAT and as a self-defense instructor, success in any operation or physical confrontation weighed heavily on superior positioning and readiness.

As a concealed carrier you must think about positioning yourself in places to provide the best defensive advantage. When in restaurants I always request to sit either near a secondary exit or at least where I can see the front door.

When pulling up to a convenience store I pull into the parking space where I can see the attendant and anyone in front of the counter before I leave my car.

This way I won’t be caught off guard and walk into a robbery in progress. I make sure I plan my gas and ATM runs during the day and choose locations that don’t have a bunch of blind spots or are isolated.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 51605
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:56 pm

4. Training in Situational Awareness is more important than range time. We all have the ability to identify when something is out of place or someone does not match the surroundings.

Practice people watching as you enter any situation so you can pick out potential threats. We all get drawn into technology and concentrate on our cell phones more than we do our environment.

As a concealed carrier you always should pay attention, so when your phone goes off with a ring or text vibration, use that first alert to remind you to visually check your surroundings and note where you are and pick it up on the second or third ring.

If you have a gut feeling, be aware and position yourself. Get help started your way.
Van
User avatar
Van Canna
 
Posts: 51605
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 1999 6:01 am

PreviousNext

Return to Van Canna's Self Defense Realities

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Exabot [Bot] and 9 guests