Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Oct 21, 2018 6:57 am

hoshin »

lets face it walkman. most people will never use real self-defence in their life time. there are a good number of reasons to train besides self- defence.

the key however is not to delude yourself and others into thinking that a person can kick butt just because he does kata and some pushups once or twice a week.

on the other hand some of us have something wrong with us in the head beause on any given night we are training, punching and kicking each other. getting brusies, cracked teeth and bloody lips.

going to seminars spending $$$ . while somewhere else the normal people are relaxing with a beer and their spouse.
but we love the training dont we!! :D

hoshin
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:03 am

This stuff can become an obsession, and even “obsessed” individuals can fill a hole in the ground very nicely. As Rory puts it...you can train and condition all you want...you can learn principles and concepts all you want...but if you don't understand/not study...what violence is all about[read Rory's book 'Meditations on Violence'...] you are just deceiving yourself and the students.

One of the most important is programming oneself to make risk-filled decisions based on what’s best for your survival, not on the attacker’s threats.

Usually a person will get a “gut feeling” about what’s about to go down. Best to visualize actions towards avoidance, evasion, and escape as the first course.

Lt. Strong indicates that this will provide you with your “own orders” to follow, instead of the “threat” at hand.

Your mind will be clogged: “ Is this really happening?” You’ll be fumbling with strategies and tactics and not knowing what to do first. Having one objective, chosen ahead of time, helps one to concentrate during a crisis”


**

The subconscious mind controls most of our first reactions during all type of crises. It is far from irrational, rather our learned experiences, real or imagined are stored there, waiting to direct and control our movements in dire circumstances.


Most people have never been seriously injured, let alone shot or knifed in a fight . They have little to no experience with such a situation, and unless they have “programmed” the survival response commensurate with the situation, they will blunder into a casket.

What must be understood and deeply internalized, is that no matter how one is “trained” under violent assault, one has only split seconds along with an overload of confusing, threatening information coming in at him. With the denial, the muscles and the mind lock up.

It is then that the subconscious mind, if programmed with simple survival directives, takes over and snaps one out of paralysis the crucial first seconds of any crisis. This is even more important than lots of training.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:05 am

Rick Wilson »

“What's the reality of self-defense training for a guy like me?”

Are we safe simply because we do not go to rough areas and mind our own business?

So you have a fender bender with a guy who snaps.

So you are like friends of my son’s who were walking to their car from a pub in a “good” area of town not too late at night when five young toughs with baseball bats attacked them.

The real question is if you ever need self protection even once – is that enough times to take it seriously.

So the simple answer is to make your 1.5 hours of training each week the best you can. Look at the training you are doing and ask yourself is it giving you what you might need for self protection?

Your time is limited so make it count. Find a style and a school that do their best to deal with most situations and train hard. Ask if they do any ground fighting training. If they say we do not go to the ground then I would say it isn’t the right place.

While I practice the stand up style of Uechi I work on ground fighting as well. You don’t always get choices in a self protection situation or I would simply chose for it not to happen.

Rick Wilson
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:10 am

Ron Klein »

Walkman:

You raise an issue that has troubled me for years. I cannot believe what my training schedule was until a few years ago. Despite the obsession of training daily (for hours) seven days a week, it was never enough-

I had been assaulted and never again would le that happen! Never enough-or so I thought.

Things have changed. I now teach my students how to train on their own and how to integrate kata movements into their daily lives.
Much is attitude.

With integrating your art into your life, dojo training becomes an essential (supplemental) element whose value is giving structure to a schedule as well as traditional discipline.

At our dojo I give my students a vast array of kata, forms and drills to choose from. Training is personalized since our dojo is not defined by commercial necessities and the attendant propaganda.

We supplement by attending seminars taught by a variety of martial artists and self protection specialists, and I personally try to meet with my firearms/LE instructor as often as I can. (Of course I also instruct personal protection and security so I have additional motivation).

I believe that martial arts can be integrated into anyone’s life style once you realize that it is a part of your life. How you integrate it, without sacrificing family and friends, is as much attitude as physical commitment.

Ron

“Dignitus, virtus et reverentia.”
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:12 am

Ron Klein »

Van:

These forums have been a breath of fresh air for me and my students.

I appreciate the opportunity to share and learn and I have learned a great deal!

Ron

“Dignitus, virtus et reverentia.”
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:18 am

The Tactical component

Good thread by Demi Barbito, on the knife forum.

Lack of understanding...
...on my part. I don't understand how some in the "self defense" or "martial arts" world are still stuck in a niche when it comes to stopping the bad guy.

It's like everyone has their own recipe for self defense and they are sure theirs will work. Some think it's JKD. Some think it's a mix of grappling, clinch and boxing. Some think it's firearms. Some think it's what Bruce Lee was doing in 1973. Some think it's karate. Some think it's wrestling.

The problem with this thinking is that the key to self-defense is none of the above.

If you have a "way" the bad guys may find a "way around it.”

This is not definitive but...

Multiple opponents counter grappling.

Knife counters gun at close range.

Grappling counters karate.

Gun counters multiple opponents.

MMA counters grappling.

Dark parking lot counters your ability to see. (White light is the latest area identified as a missing element in self-preservation)

I could go on but I get it it. The people I work with get it. Others get it. I see that many still don't though.

Proximity negates skill. I've been screaming this into people ears for years. If you have no way of operating from a distance you have limited your response options.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby paulg » Sun Oct 21, 2018 12:15 pm

Depends on what you are studying, and why. Think of a series of concentric circles, small to large. the smallest, innermost circle is pure Uechi-ryu. You may decide for reasons of scholarship or loyalty to your sensei and the ancestor senseis that you are going to limit yourself to what is Uechi-ryu alone. Maybe you were told as a young student, and maybe you believe, that Uechi-ryu is so complete and so perfect that it is all you should ever want to know. Or maybe you think it would be taboo to 'mess up' your Uechi-ryu with other techniques or ideas. Ignore evidence to the contrary, or try to force alternative ideas into the mold of Uechi-ryu. You know the rationalization; 'this is Uechi-ryu, it is just hidden.' Move out to the next circle, which I call 'karate with a small k'. Here you have more latitude to take from other styles and systems or even invent things of your own. Still fundamentally Uechi-ryu, but with a bit of flexibility and personalized adaptation. The next circle further out we could call 'martial arts,' meaning we are open to skills and techniques such as you find in judo or aikido or escrima or what-have-you. The outermost circle we could call 'self-defense', and this allows the most latitude of all, including use of modern weapons and the much more generalized skills for avoiding dangers that are often discussed on these pages. If this paradigm implies a value judgment, I should say that I respect peoples' decision to train at any level of the circles, as long as they know that is what they are doing. I put myself at the 'small k-to martial arts' level, and I know there are some limitations here, but at this point in my life and my study it fits me best. I have unending gratitude to the Uechi family and to GEM and others who taught me, but I never took an oath that I would not look at or consider other things.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Oct 21, 2018 3:31 pm

Good post Paul, thank you.
The outermost circle we could call 'self-defense', and this allows the most latitude of all, including use of modern weapons and the much more generalized skills for avoiding dangers that are often discussed on these pages.


As my forum was created with the ‘self defense’ component in mind, this ‘outer circle’ is the only one that seems to be of interest to the multitude reading my forum. This thread is approaching the one million views number.

All the rest about the ‘Do’ and other reasons to study, with implications that once you ‘go deep’ in Uechi, all things will come, like self protection_ really does not interest my readers.

Again, I recommend that those ‘thinkers’ start reading Rory’s books on violence dynamics and really learn something about keeping safe.

Absolutely nothing wrong with being in the 'small k-to martial arts' level you describe…it is fine for most of us anyway who go to extremes to avoid the machismo BS and confrontations that end up empting our pockets of hard earned money to begin with...as we get ready to end up underground or behind bars.

In my investigations I have had to interview convicts in jail...and I can tell you the jailhouse experience, even as a visitor, is something that will make you cringe at its thought.

The people who kept posting on my forum to try to impress how skilled, how well trained here or Okinawa or the dark side of the moon, they were…have for the most part fallen into a black hole, maybe with a bit of a shove from Rory’s books, if they even were read.

It is the tactical component that keeps people safe, and it is something missing in our training unless special studies or trainers are brought in as it does not exist in Uechi traditional tool box, as it should not, being a totally different field.

Really a no brainer.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:03 pm

By Demi Moore
Demi

The moral of the story is:

No matter how good your boxing is, it's potentially useless if you opponent brought a knife.

Threat Recognition

Movement

Firearms

OC Spray

White Light

Improvised Projectiles

Impact Weapons

Bladed Weapons

Counter Knife

Empty Hand Counter Assault Tactics

Grappling

I've seen many different approaches. I've been paid by the US government to train law enforcement over the past few years and I've seen "some" failures even there in the lack of comprehensive training.

Not only in the "how" (spelled realistic) but in the what (spelled no counter knife, no CQB, weak firearms handling and more).

Have you not seen how the terrorist enemies of the US are training. Even though they are rag tag etc. they are effective.

So when someone says you have to train for "years and years in any one thing to be great" just focus on being effective.

That does mean you have to apply yourself and spend some time on each element. Or you could just be a great striker. And maybe you can even beat up a lot of people. But I see beyond that.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:08 pm

Jhivaro man writes

In an ideal world, our awareness of our surroundings "should" always give us early warning. But whatever about the "should", even the best of us get caught out from time to time.

If awareness and staying switched on was a fool-proof method of dictating the range at which self-defence situations ended at, then that would be great: but they only go so far.

This relates to some of the discussion of fighting at "extreme close quarters" which has gone on in the "edge in / edge out" thread.

In that we have a methodology specifically adapted to the problem of extreme proximity.

For when Murphy really does appear, and ruin our day. When there is little warning (and we miss it), when we are plowed into and the fight is on irrespective of whether we feel its just a little too close for us to be at our best.

The following essay, on assymetrical preparation / armament in confrontations, relates to this : http://www.shivworks.com/mythproparm.asp

After discussing the importance of awareness, the author acknowledges that:


sometimes we don’t pick up the threat and they are on us before we can preemptively get a grip, on our tool. Remember when I said before that bad guys aren’t stupid.
You can be rest assured that his weapon, and there will probably be one, will be in hand, and out where he can use it.

He will keep it hidden but in hand, close the gap, and only let you see it when he’s right upon you. Doesn’t matter whether it’s a gun or a knife. So where’s the range now?


...

The bad guy is not going to be at range and brandish a weapon, giving you time and the cue to equally arm yourself. If he chooses to go after you, then it’s probably because your awareness has lapsed.

Even so, he’s not going to close on you unarmed, and if he does then it’s usually because he has a buddy who more than likely is.

So the idea that confrontations begin with both participants equally and proportionally armed is a myth.

You will either see the threat and make preparations for a potentially armed encounter, or you will be in one before you know that it’s an armed encounter and have to deal with it hands on or access a tool in fight
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:13 pm

Dale Seago writes

Originally posted by Demi @ CSPT
Many martial artists I work with are anti-gun. Many think that throwing something is stupid. Others think that running is dumb (They say "If I'm going to train so hard why run?)


I've run into that same attitude many times over the years, but only with martial artists who have lost touch (or never been in touch!) with the literal meaning of "martial" as "pertaining to, or suitable for, warfare".

My own teacher in Japan, Masaaki Hatsumi, has commented, "Animals fight with claws and teeth. The nature of human beings is to fight with weapons. I am trying to teach you to fight as a human being".

In my art firearms are considered just another weapon among many that we may use. Hatsumi sensei has also pointed out (and demonstrated many times over the years I've trained with him)

that any true martial art does not need to fundamentally change just because technology changes: It simply incorporates the new technology into the overall knowledge base in a way which is compatible with the art's principles, so that the most effective use can be made of it.


Well I have been saying the same thing here on my forum for years but it only caused Uechi monks to raise chants of despair, even though they had never seen
a real street fight.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:18 pm

From the “Shivworks” article

Usually when one takes training or instruction what they are receiving is an instructor’s vision of a confrontation and the means to prevent or manage such.

A lot can be gleaned about someone’s reference points to the realities of self-defense, by examining the methods they espouse.

This is important from the standpoint of insuring that you are indeed training in a system that matches the realities of the way life or death struggle flows.


Think about this long and hard. Do we, as dojo trained “traditionalists,” as strong and effective as we might be, have the “proper qualifications” to teach our students “street survival”?

Remember what I wrote about the father of that Uechi student who threatened to sue the Uechi sensei and the organization, because his son took a bad beating?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Oct 21, 2018 9:23 pm

COMBAT BREATHING

From Sports Speed-2nd Edition by George Dintiman, Robert Ward, Thomas Tellez

Combat Breathing

Combat breathing techniques bring the mind and body into a state of harmony to produce some amazing feats on the field.

These techniques are based on the knowledge that all body systems work together. Athletes learn to apply the laws of pneumatics to the respiratory system for maximum protection and power output by absorbing and transmitting energy in a variety of playing situations.

Because every form of human performance requires the use of energy, combat breathing is of value for all sports.

Combat breathing was developed by Dr. Rod Sackarnowski, Juko-Kai Master, to serve as a foundation course of instruction in the martial arts.

Many players and coaches feel that combat breathing directly applies to virtually every sport or any form of human performance. Combat breathing is especially applicable to sports that emphasize contact such as football, basketball, soccer, and rugby, to name a few.

During the Tom Landry era, the Dallas Cowboys’ combat breathing sessions helped players to deliver more energy on target, receive and absorb more energy from contact, avoid injury or bruising, and avert the discomfort that is usually associated with high-energy impact forces.

The potential to prevent or minimize injury to tissues by using combat breathing is exciting. The trunk, for example, serves as the crossroads for energy transfer in all human movement. Forces can move from the lower to the upper extremities or vice versa.

The back, therefore, is a common site of injury and a major source of pain, discomfort, and disability. Studies show that a healthy back withstands compressive forces of 1,000 to 1,800 pounds when performing daily tasks. Maximum lifting can produce compressive forces in the 2,000 pound range.

Imagine the forces involved in the collisions of many accelerating players. Modern-day athletes who are bigger, stronger, and faster than athletes of the past can generate tremendous forces that are at or near the limits of human tolerance. Studies using Dallas Cowboys players as subjects showed that these players deliver striking forces of over 2,000 pounds when hitting blocking bags.

To stay injury-free, athletes should master the science of energy transfer, a technique that is applied through combat breathing.

Combat breathing techniques help to control the body’s collective resources, which makes it possible to withstand the forces of a fast start, a fast stop, or the several thousand pounds of force that can be generated by players hitting one another.

Releasing air pressure in the chest cavity through the mouth helps you to precisely manage the force delivered from such a hit.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 22, 2018 4:23 am

Aspects of Breathing in the Martial Arts
Part One: The Fundamentals
Roberto Delicata


Introduction
The role of breathing in the martial arts is complex, and extends far beyond
the physical act of oxygenating the blood. In this essay I will explore some
of the aspects of breathing as they apply to the martial arts, both as a com-
bative discipline and as a promoter of health and longevity.

The wealth of breathing techniques championed by martial arts instructors
is almost as diverse as the styles that these instructors practise.

As a karate
student well conditioned to exhaling strongly whilst punching, I was duly
reprimanded for doing so in a Shaolin kung-fu class. “Why are you breath-
ing loudly?”, I was asked. “If you breath loudly, your opponent will know
that you are about to attack!”.

Whilst I cannot fault the logic in this, the
justification for audible breathing is equally as convincing. I use this to high-
light the fact that there is rarely a single right way to do anything in martial
arts.

For much of this essay I favour the discussion of principle over tech-
nique, since the principles of martial arts are, in general, more uniform than
the way they are implemented within particular styles.

Where I do descend
into discussion on technique, it should be borne in mind that a method is
being talked about, and not the method.


continues...
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 22, 2018 4:27 am

Breathing techniques

At a very basic level, karate students are taught that breathing plays an
important role in the correct execution of technique. Inhalation should take
place through the nose and exhalation through the mouth.

Inhalation is usu-
ally performed in the transition between stances or positions and exhalation
proceeds whilst the technique is performed.

If a sequence of techniques oc-
cur in quick succession, the exhalation is usually spread over the number of
techniques involved.

One master, Kenko Nakaima, professed that breathing
(during kata training) should be natural, exhaling with a sharp hiss when

striking.



Shoshin Nagamine taught that a defensive technique should be executed with
inhalation, whereas an offensive technique should be executed with exhala-
tion. These views are all joined by a common thread: they teach the what,
but not the why.

The rudiments of correct breathing are oft stated but rarely
explained.

In all of the examples above, the teachers advocate that exhalation
should accompany an offensive technique.


.....>
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