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PostPosted: Fri May 07, 1999 2:32 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 24, 1998 6:01 am
Posts: 311
Location: Washington DC area, USA
John Thurston in his forum had pasted this:

"A Japanese Flier (Saburo Sakai) I think, said:
" What good is it to be the best swordsman in the World, when your opponent stands off and shoot at you with arrows?""

I just thought that this quote sums up what Canna Sensei has been trying to drive home to people in terms of real world fighting; that we may spend too much time focussing on areas of training that are only going to or were only meant to take you but so far.

Time to metaphorically also learn to pick up the bow in our training (on these days, also learn the GUN)?

Cecil



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PostPosted: Sat May 08, 1999 5:11 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 16, 1998 6:01 am
Posts: 670
Cecil, not to digress, but that reminds me of the scene from "Raiders of the Lost Ark" when IJ takes out the master swordsman with his revolver.

Moral.."don't show up to a gun fight with a knife".

Kevin


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PostPosted: Sat May 08, 1999 5:22 am 
Gotta love that Cerebus! Was a big fan.

Rick


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PostPosted: Sat May 08, 1999 7:03 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 17, 1998 6:01 am
Posts: 405
Location: Tewksbury, MA USA
The Japanese have a saying, "Tagei wa Mugei", or "To have many skills/techniques is to have no skills/techniques" (our equivalent: "Jack of all trades, Master of none").

Remember that your opponent may not always have his arrows. In that case, it would be very helpful to be the world's best swordsman.

I am a great proponent of cross-training. We spar, grapple, kickbox and train in Kobudo at my school. It is good to be exposed to many arts, but it is better to be a true master of one.

Like in business, the specialist is always worth more. Yes, s/he is "obsolete" in some situations. True excellence in something sometimes precludes true excellence in something else.

This does not suggest that we should not be knowledgeable in the art of arrows. Only that, in reality, should we abandon our swords to meet our opponent on their plane risks 1.) Chasing two rabbits in our martial practice, and 2.) Putting ourselves in unfamiliar territory. Either way, you lose.

Try to make your opponent play YOUR game. It is where you are most comfortable and effective. If you cannot do this, recognize your opponent's game and avoid it. If you cannot do this, arrow lessons will not help now.

Keep training,

Gary

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http://www.uechi-ryu.com/khoury


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PostPosted: Sun May 09, 1999 6:47 am 
Gary:

Really good post!

Rick


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PostPosted: Sun May 09, 1999 1:13 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 28, 1998 6:01 am
Posts: 2424
Location: MARSHFIELD, MA. USA
Hello:

Is my unworthy name being taken in vain?

The quote was from a book I cannot find Named "Zero" by Saburo Sakai. He was referring to the Japanese having difficulties with the American overall style of fighting,such as the use of the "Bi Ji Ni Ku" (B-29), which at the time they began to raid Japan flew literally higher than any Japanese interceptor (save one) whose development had been arrested to produce larger number of the now-believe it or not-obsolecent Zero.

The moral indicates not that one should not train with the sword, as Cecil I'm sure would be absolutely clear on, but rather to train on the best and most needed weapon(s) practicable for personal or national survival as the case may be.


Classic quote of an unknown Marine twosome, one an FNG and the other a Salty guy with time in country (Vietnam):

Old Salt: "So, whatta they teachin you guys back a Parris Island?'

FNG: "Korea".


(Wrong war)


JOHN T

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PostPosted: Mon May 10, 1999 1:13 am 
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Joined: Sat Nov 28, 1998 6:01 am
Posts: 2424
Location: MARSHFIELD, MA. USA
Gary San:

I'm with you on this one.

As you said, even if learning the sword was not supportable on its own merits in a weapons laden world, it WOULD come in real handy when and if the quiver clicks on empty.


Nicer still to have both skills and both weapons.

With peaceful intentions.

JOHN T

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