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 Post subject: The human animal
PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 4:11 am 
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Interesting to look at the way animals, including humans, have built-in ways to express the survival instinct in different ways, depending on whether it be play/social violence or pure survival situations (predator/prey).

What if we are directed to make a fist by our CNS, in social situations, as a way to preclude our primal instinct to grab ahold of our prey.

When we make a fist, what are we really doing, physically?


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 Post subject: Re: The human animal
PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 4:32 am 
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I was watching a dvd about combatives, where the instructor said that our instinctive response in a survival situation is to square our torso/eyes with the enemy, raise our hands in front of the chest, bend our knees and go flat-footed. Sounds familiar.

And then you could look at blading, and standing on the balls of the feet as a way to deal with social violence, or maybe just things that people can do, when they are not reverting to the lizard brain.


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 Post subject: Re: The human animal
PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 4:56 am 
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In looking at the physiological changes that occur, such as loss of fine movement, and heightened gross motor movement, one can look at the difference between a spinning heel kick and a downward stomp.

Interesting to look at the difference between a perfectly executed left jab, and a hammer fist/forearm/elbow to the base of the skull/back of the neck.

The human animal.


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 Post subject: Re: The human animal
PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 6:06 am 
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5 Dragon
Quote:
When we make a fist, what are we really doing, physically?


Interesting thread, Sean.

I find this article intriguing as to Natural Reflexes As a base to Self Defense Techniques...

http://kravmaga-ikmf.com/ikmf/articles/ ... echniques/

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 Post subject: Re: The human animal
PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 6:16 am 
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It is important to understand what we are. Many people who take classes in karate or self defense don't have any understanding of what a human being can do. Much too cerebral.


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 Post subject: Re: The human animal
PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 6:47 am 
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Good comments Sean...please give us more.

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 Post subject: Re: The human animal
PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 7:12 am 
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Because we are civilized and cerebral, we need to look at the differences in the ways wild animals play/fight and how they both prey on and defend themselves from other animals.

You need to know when someone is preying on you, and you need to know that you are a predator.


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 Post subject: Re: The human animal
PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2014 3:29 pm 
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Great points, great thread.

As the human animal, if I had never set foot in a dojo, I'd probably be the rabbit. Freeze so as not to be seen - then scamper away like hell itself was chasing me.
Martial Arts changed that. Of course, it only took a zillion years, but I suspect the changes were many and in small doses. I don't think we notice a lot of the changes as they happen, they're very subtle.

I can't imagine what I'd be like if I had never seen Martial Arts. Sure as hell wouldn't be the same person. Can't speak for anyone else, but I can for me. Also for a lot of folks I've trained with or taught long term. Not just in physical terms, not just in attitude towards life, but also physiological. I firmly believe Martial training can change your physiology under stress as well as under attack or potential attack.


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 Post subject: Re: The human animal
PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 2014 4:27 pm 
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Great post Otto, no question that martial arts change people mostly for the better.

It is also the developing of great camaraderie, friendship, loyalty, and tolerance that usually we notice in long time practitioners that complete the 'package'.

Another aspect of martial arts 'influence' that I see is that _in good practitioners and students of violence_ as it should be, comes a realization of personal limitations so as to preclude stupid tactical mistakes in not recognizing overwhelming dangers.

One great reason for ongoing education and reading such well written books by Rory Miller...that provide great insight along the theme of this thread.

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 Post subject: Re: The human animal
PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2014 10:41 am 
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8)

I just lost a dear friend and it reminded my of a simple truth. The only times I have ever moved with meaning, were the times I moved with my heart. I don't mean to say emotions, like anger or hate, but love. That is when movement carries weight.


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 Post subject: Re: The human animal
PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2014 3:43 pm 
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:) Amen, my friend.

I must say that I have also seen karate adversely affect quite a few people...
getting in the way of friendship and common sense.

It can becomes an all driving force in some people that can get them into a state of 'cockiness' and intolerance...losing friendships... devaluing others putting them at a lesser position_ and finding a sensation of superiority.

This is the 'extra long black belt syndrome' that often results in being used as casket straps to lower some poor misguided soul into a hole in the ground.

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 Post subject: Re: The human animal
PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2014 12:28 pm 
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8)

Once, when I was working for a contractor, I was breaking concrete spacers with my hands. He took the time to explain to me that the human animal uses tools.


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 Post subject: Re: The human animal
PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2014 6:57 am 
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There is something else we need to know about the human animal that we rarely discuss_

There are certain pathological fears, and certain peculiarities in the expression of ordinary fear, which might receive an explanatory light from ancestral conditions, even infra-human ones.

In ordinary fear, one may _ either run, or remain semi-paralyzed. The latter condition reminds us of the so-called death-shamming instinct shown by many animals.

Dr. Lindsay, in his work 'Mind in Animals,' says this must require great self-command in those that practice it. But it is really no feigning of death at all, and requires no self-command. It is simply a terror-paralysis which has been so useful as to become hereditary.

The beast of prey does not think the motionless bird, insect, or crustacean dead. He simply fails to notice them at all; because his senses, like ours, are much more strongly excited by a moving object than by a still one.

It is the same instinct which leads a boy playing 'I spy' to hold his very breath when the seeker is near, and which makes the beast of prey himself in many cases motionlessly lie in wait for his victim or silently 'stalk' it, by rapid approaches alternated with periods of immobility.

It is the opposite of the instinct which makes us jump up and down and move our arms when we wish to attract the notice of some one passing far away, and makes the shipwrecked sailor frantically wave a cloth upon the raft where he is floating when a distant sail appears.

There is a lot to learn from these aspects of the human animal to be visualized as we train.

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 Post subject: Re: The human animal
PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2014 11:34 am 
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8)

Van:

"which makes the beast of prey himself in many cases motionlessly lie in wait for his victim or silently 'stalk' it, by rapid approaches alternated with periods of immobility. "

Motion and stillness as yin/yang, as two opposing yet complimentary forces.


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 Post subject: Re: The human animal
PostPosted: Sun Nov 23, 2014 10:56 pm 
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fivedragons wrote:
8)

Once, when I was working for a contractor, I was breaking concrete spacers with my hands. He took the time to explain to me that the human animal uses tools.


Nothing you didn't already know about, my friend :D

But a sobering remark nonetheless. Today, even more so than yesterday, there is no more guarantee of 'empty hand' fighting in any type of assault...

I keep telling my students that_ we must be careful in all the ways we seek out training in different systems...because it has the tendency to script assumptions [Read Rory Miller's books] in our heads.

The confrontation that you’ve scripted in your own head, can quickly get out of hand.

You think...I can take this guy[s] and find yourself in quick sand. This video clip is particularly poignant.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=20LMMx_HlFs

These days any confrontation can and will turn deadly very quickly when suddenly finding yourself against unexpected weapons.

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