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PostPosted: Mon Nov 22, 2010 3:50 pm 
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:?:

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 22, 2010 8:53 pm 
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O.K. Here is the scoop .

I performed an experiment using clients/students.I took two of them 1 male 1 female and and trained them in a TMA format teaching Uechi Ryu as it's done 'by the book'.

The second group I took and trained in a 'modern' program of boxing / kickboxing/jujitsu skills and drills similar to what is being taught in multipile MMA and Boxing clubs I have visited.

The result....(drum roll please).............

The students who began training in the Uechi System and later crossed over to other styles were better prepared for realistic encounters than their kickboxing counterparts who found it harder to learn Uechi after being 'gym trained'....

The email you :?:ed was a students response to his personal discovery of how Uechis' skill sets prepared him to better learn transitions from striking to grappling and the generation of knock out power in boxing........................ :wink:

Sensei Robb ,
"I'm really starting to understand why this art(Uechi) is so important to know...when this art is absorbed it makes learning the kickboxing so much easier...for example I remember you telling me about how I wasn't stepping through on my cross punch...but with this art you step through with your punch in the exercise and with the practice of that it automatically makes me step in with the cross punch. I also like the blocking as it leads to trapping the opponet into you and then getting into grappling and take downs...I want to learn more of this stuff and be good at it
thanks"

Justin

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 Post subject: Excellent Robb. . .
PostPosted: Mon Nov 22, 2010 8:59 pm 
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One of my students is teaching a women's self defense program. The women have a difficult time moving, stepping or performing any kind of coordinated move, such as hitting "Bob" without nearly falling over. Simple things you take for granted after spending some time in Uechi-ryu, these new students aren't even aware of.

Good test with data most Uechi teachers are already aware of. :)

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2010 4:11 am 
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Now it makes sense. :D

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2010 4:51 am 
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Sorry I was internally focused Van Sensei oops !!! :oops:

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2010 5:40 am 
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Never a problem Robb :wink:

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2010 3:26 pm 
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Mr. Lewis, many people are adamant that a martial arts instructor must be a master of executing techniques and fighting. However, many of the great boxing instructors such as Angelo Dundee, weren't fighters. How much emphasis would you personally place on an instructor's ability to perform technique and fight? Should an instructor be proficient in combat to teach it, or is it only essential that one be able to show a fighter how to master the moves without being a master of them yourself? I would love to hear your thoughts on this...........? :?

“What counts most is not the martial arts skills you’re able to perform or to teach someone, but rather the confidence you leave within them that enables their effective use of those skills.” 8)


When Angelo Dundee’s Brother, Chris, wanted his own Son to learn how to defend himself, he did not send him to train with the Uncle, Angelo; instead, he send him to take karate lessons from one of our Florida studios. 8O

Some of my instructors taught me technique, and others taught me about how to fight. In other words, some trainers are good at teaching “style” and others are better at developing ones “substance.” A fighter needs both. :o

“It is not what you’ve done that makes you what you are (a great trainer), it is what you are made of that determines that.” 8)

( I posted this and posed the question in response to a discussion about 'shime' and over testing in Sanchin )

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2010 12:38 pm 
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For my early years as a martial artist I had the erroneos belief that we were all supposed to all do kata the same , like "good little Uechi robots....." :?

Good basics are important , synchronised kata (to develop timing not train robots). :o

" In everyday life, how important is it to make the exact same moves as others? When each of us subscribes to a particular martial art style, isn't that the same process as when we're doing katas? " 8O


"You begin martial arts as an original, then why become a copy?" :roll:

"When is it 'safe' to let a student express themselves outta the box?" :idea:

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2010 1:42 pm 
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.....I've seen guys stopped on leg kicks---great weapon and we ...use them a lot in our system, both as blocks and as offense. We also love forearm and elbow strikes to the incoming kicks for defense (Bando and Muay Boron). We even use head butts to block incoming punches and kicks. "Not everybody will appreciate 'my' methods."


I've been hit with cut kicks to the legs and never stopped or went down. Many, who I wasn't even trying to hit ....DID go down. (Uechi conditioning?) 8O

I usually fought really big opponents; they went down just as fast as the smaller ones. Many went down (and still do) simply because they can't take a hit or have a very low pain tolerance. I see a lot of this in some of today's MMA matches.Some champions have been barely clipped on the chin, went down, and didn't get up.

"It's not the number of times you go down that counts, it's the number of times you get back up!" 8)

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2010 2:08 am 
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http://www.dojolocator.com/dojodetails.aspx?id=17101

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 08, 2010 4:15 pm 
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Recently the FBI, or more precisely, Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) have released a searchable database tool where the user can input particular crimes, at particular areas in the US and over certain time periods. This is a very useful tool, particularly if you live in the US. This tool enables you to drill down into the specifics of violent crime for YOUR state.

What I have done in this article is just showcase some 50 year trends in crime in the US.The figures were generated by the UCR database tool. Violent crime peaked in 1992 with 1,932,274 total number of violent crimes reported in that year. From the figures obtained from the UCR database, we can learn that from 1960 to 2009, there have been a total number of 59, 307, 925 violent crimes reported in the US.


Aggravated Assault

The assault statistics over the 50 years follows similar trends as the overall violent crime numbers. The numbers peaked at about the early to mid 1990's at over 1 million incidents. Aggravated Assault is the largest sector of violent crime. This is due to most incidents being related to social or group activities where posturing and other types of Alpha Male activity occur. Fights are normally the outcome of such behaviour and this in crime/legal terms is Aggravated Assault.

What is interesting is that the Assaults trended smoothly up, building to the peak in the 90's. I have not done the research, but this climb is probably related to an increase in population.

Robbery

For the robbery trends, they also peaked around the early 90's to just under 700,000 in that year. From that peak in the early 90's the drop has been quite severe with overall Robbery numbers dropping dramatically to almost half of what they were 8 yrs after the peak.


Murder

The murder/Non Negligent Manslaughter numbers are much lower than robbery for example but again the figures show similar trends over time.

The underlying nature of Robbery and Murder is similar. They are both Predatory type behaviours. It is only natural that the trends would be similar between these two types of violent crime. As I first saw these similarities, I was surprised as I was not looking for them.

Forcible Rape

The overall numbers of Forcible Rape also peaked in the early 90's at about 110,000 however the drop in numbers has not been as significant as Robbery for example. I am not an expert in rape so will not pretend to be one here.

The main thing I note is that this follows similar trends to the assault. Perhaps this is an indication that rape is tied to an underlying social/alpha male type activity from the perpetrators.

Property Crime

Property Crime numbers show a similar overall trend over the 50 years. Again, numbers peak in the early 90's at about 13 million incidents nationwide in the US. Even though the trend is for a lowering of the number of Property Crimes reported each year.

Property Crimes are more Predatory in nature. This is in line with the entire concept of the Alpha Male and Predatory behaviour model of human combative behaviour.

Larceny/Theft

The Larceny/Theft numbers although quite high with a current number of just under 6,750,000, are following the same trends with a peak period around the early 90's. This seems to contain elements of both the Alpha Male and the Predatory trends seen in the previous examples.

Perhaps the Alpha Male and Predatory model is most relavent to actual combative behaviour and not so much for other crime types and social behaviour. This could also be why the property trends are less distinct. :?

I had no idea I would identify these patterns in the charts. My intent was just to highlight the UCR database tool , I thought there would be much more variation in each of the charts. :o

I am surprised the relationship between different types of human combative behaviour emerged through these charts which showcase trends over 50 years. Perhaps I am looking into them too hard? 8O

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 08, 2010 5:32 pm 
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“See that guy over there?” He indicates a big, strapping fellow, his 6’4″ frame enrobed in 300 lbs. of muscle. “He’s coming over here to wrestle you to the ground and choke you out for a million dollars. If you can pin him instead, I’ll give you the million.”
“B-but,” you stammer, “I don’t want to wrestle him!”
The man sniffs. “Doesn’t matter — he wants the million. Here he comes — best of luck!”

How does it feel to suddenly have this contest thrust upon you? To have to worry about your performance, and how it will stack up to his experience level?

For all you know, he could be very good at wrestling — and even if you, yourself, are no slouch in the ring, he’s clearly way outside your weight class. And much, much stronger. As he begins to sprint toward you, you notice he’s a lot faster, too.

How’s it feel now?

Let’s try a different tack:

Same set up, except the man says…

“All you have to do is touch him, and I’ll give you the million instead.”

Feel any different?

How about if we qualify that touch a bit –

“All you have to do is break something inside of him.” And you’ll get the million.

In the first case, the contest is sprung upon you, you’re not prepared, you’re being asked to compete with the man’s physical size and athletic ability. You’re being asked to perform at a level most of us can’t reach. You’re being asked to compete in such a way that is clearly unfair, and puts you at a disadvantage.

We could just as easily set up a scenario where you are suddenly tasked with debating international monetary policy, before an audience, with someone who may or may not be a Nobel laureate in economics.

We’ve all got the basic tools, the components to compete in such a contest — we can speak out loud, we have experience with finances and money in general — and yet, the idea makes me sweat. Most of us can expect to get hammered and humiliated, everything we say twisted back on us with a sneer and derisive laughter from the audience.

In the second case where, “All you have to do is touch him,” there is no performance pressure — we can all reach out and touch the guy, even if he wants to wrestle us. In fact, there’s really no way you can lose — how can he wrestle you down & choke you out without you touching him at some point? It’s so simple it’s ridiculous.

And sure, that ‘touch’ can easily be used to break something inside of him, as in the slightly more difficult scenario. We all know he can’t successfully wrestle you without you crushing his groin or gouging an eye at some point. Everything he would want to do just pulls you in nice and close to those delicate anatomical features. Another easy win.

All of the above highlights another distinct difference between competition and violence – that impending competition brings with it performance anxiety as you realize you will be required to pit your skill against unknown thresholds (what if he’s the better wrestler? or speaker?). It’s the worry that your meager skills will be outclassed.

When we remove the competition and go instead to a win condition that is not dependent on unknown thresholds (i.e., nothing about the other guy factors into the equation) there is no dread or anxiety.

Now, I know what you’re thinking — what about performance anxiety around getting violence done?

Well, how anxious did you feel about merely touching the guy, above? Really? Outside of counting coup, did your anxiety increase when it was qualified as causing an injury (“…break something inside of him.”)? If the answer is yes, then…

YOU’RE STILL LOOKING AT VIOLENCE AS COMPETITION!
Violence, as the absence of competition, has no performance anxiety component.

It really is just touching, if we mean it in the same way that we would smash a soda can flat, or slam a car door, or break a stick on the curb. The physics and biomechanics involved are all the same. Any considerations beyond that are imaginary. Hang ups, if you will.

As with pretty much everything in this work, the solution is mat time.

It’s the second best place to learn that competition has nothing to do with anything in violence, that size, speed and strength have no bearing on who wins and who dies.

Those who still view violence as a form of competition, a high-stakes one, act hesitantly on the mats; they keep their distance (even when they think they’re penetrating), flinch, hide and otherwise give poor reactions, and rarely employ bodyweight.

They behave as if they are fundamentally frightened of what’s going on. Which they are.

Those who have figured it out by physically burning the idea out of their heads with hours of mat time throw themselves into the work with great relish, applying themselves bodily to every problem presented them.

The physical realization that violence is about a failure to compete, an end-run around competition, is liberating.

Gone is the worry about being big enough, fast enough or strong enough. The other guy’s skill counts for absolutely nothing. It’s all about you, and only you. The other guy is prey to be taken, meat to be butchered. The pressure’s off & you’re free to do as you will.

You’re exercising your legacy as a predator — and by all accounts, predation is pleasurable.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 08, 2010 5:33 pm 
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You’re exercising your legacy as a predator — and by all accounts, predation is pleasurable. :wink:

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 08, 2010 10:28 pm 
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robb buckland wrote:
http://www.dojolocator.com/dojodetails.aspx?id=17101


Congrats, Robb...quite the place for every taste it seems.

How many different types of instructors do you have?

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 08, 2010 10:51 pm 
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Those who still view violence as a form of competition, a high-stakes one, act hesitantly on the mats; they keep their distance (even when they think they’re penetrating), flinch, hide and otherwise give poor reactions, and rarely employ bodyweight.

They behave as if they are fundamentally frightened of what’s going on. Which they are.

Those who have figured it out by physically burning the idea out of their heads with hours of mat time throw themselves into the work with great relish, applying themselves bodily to every problem presented them.

The physical realization that violence is about a failure to compete, an end-run around competition, is liberating.

Gone is the worry about being big enough, fast enough or strong enough. The other guy’s skill counts for absolutely nothing. It’s all about you, and only you. The other guy is prey to be taken, meat to be butchered. The pressure’s off & you’re free to do as you will.


This is well said as when we think in terms of self defense, self preservation.

And anyone who really believes that his survival against the ways of street violence/ can be taken care of _solely with empty hands 'techniques' no matter how 'skillful' _ is delusional in my view.

Prevailing against overwhelming violence, such as the 6'4" 300 lb gorilla...is and will always be the purview of a force continuum used with discretion as the situation dictates.

As an example, an attack by the 'gorilla' upon a smaller, weaker person, is 'deadly force' as it would be in a multiple assaillant/armed/unarmed situation.

One would be justified in using 'weaponry' against such attack if judiciously applied.

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