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Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 24, 2010 3:28 pm

When we train for defending ourselves or another we have to be sure the techniques are sound maning they will work on the average time applied, easy to remember so the way it is presented allows the student to learn the technique in the stress environment they will be needed to perform in, and effective in the real world we live in meaning it is not field proven then it is just a good idea....
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Dave

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 24, 2010 3:31 pm

First I think we need to find out why we are doing the style you are doing. Example...I BELIEVE in traditional Martial Arts....

The History, Culture, the values it instills, the discipline. The forms, various movement, blocking, striking..the foundation you become a part of...and beauty of what it all encompasses.

Then the other side of me...the reality that in my career and job field I deal with life and death daily.....if you were a baker and made a mistake on the job you only burn the cookies.....in my field if I make a mistake the person I am training could die.....(yes I do take this very seriously, as ANYONE who is training someone to save their life should)....

...preparing others to do battle in and out of the courtroom....the fact that what I teach has to be fact..not someone personal opinion..(as a professional this motivates you to learn more and more each day)..

we are not talking about teaching something you like or do not like..it is not about YOU..not about your own ego, your own likes and dislikes..IT IS ALL ABOUT THE STUDENT.......

We teach A WAY of doing something...but through time and experience you learn that even though you are teaching A WAY, there are some better ways then other ways...everything changes, and if the instructors don't change then get behind the curve ball, and the student will evidently lose....

I think that separating the two is needed however in a way they can be blended together...Here is what my system adds and what I envisioning working with the IUKF on...
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Dave

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 24, 2010 3:34 pm

I have identified 4 basic categories for student learning;

Awkward Stage - This is when the student is trying something for the first time. When they get to actually physically do it...think of it as a baby fawn trying to walk..they see their mother do it and they try to copy.

Guided Discovery - This is when they go through the motions in some order from the way they have seen it and heard it and by now they have tried it a few times......They will continue learning but will still try to throw in their own way of doing it until they come to realize they need to do it the way it was taught...

This is a good example of why it is harder to teach black belts to do something new then white belts....

Comfort Stage - This is when they are doing it from short term memory. They have heard it, seen it, and have got it out of their system trying to do it their way...(remember every student learns differently and YOU CANNOT TEACH them the way YOU LEARNED!)

Once these 3 stages have been completed then the student enters the Proficiency Building Stage - This is when they will building on the basics and perfect their skill within themselves and when they get at this stage they can be taught other things that add to what they were taught.....

If you skip a stage you prolong and at times hinder the learning process....
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READ THIS

Postby Van Canna » Wed Feb 24, 2010 3:40 pm

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The FULL spectrum

Postby robb buckland » Fri Feb 26, 2010 12:17 pm

Lots to Learn..........

The FULL spectrum would have to include activities leading up to the actual encounter. This is aspects such as awareness, knowledge of the victim selection process and signs and indicators of agitated persons or persons about to commit a violent action.

The full spectrum must also include events immediately after an encounter such as gathering witnesses, knowing what to say to police and being able to render first aid. Another aspect would be the day to day and 'industry' knowledge and lifestyle that comes with being a MODERN CITIZEN WARRIOR

'Soft' Skills

Involves such things as studying the psychological and physical effects of being involved in violence, past warrior societies and the nature of human combat. Another area that should be included in the full spectrum of combat is a knowledge of home security, mobile security and personal security measures. These areas can be included in the awareness or pre conflict stage.



Combat is Linear

The process of an attack happening is linear. An attacker will not suddenly morph into your room at night, stab you then go about 'casing' your place out. He will 'case' your place out before breaking into it.

There is a process involved in any attack and there are certain identifiable stages. It is these stages which will be presented below, in the order of occurrence which will be the vehicle used to present the full spectrum of combat.

Pre Attack Stage

This is the most important stage. What happens here will effect what happens in the actual attack stage, if it even gets that far. This stage shapes the next stage. An attacker can be 'defeated' during this stage with no need for physical confrontation. This can happen for many reasons.

Awareness can relate to many aspects of the pre attack stage. Awareness can relate to being out on foot, it can relate to an awareness of home security principles and can relate to some basic security principles when driving in a car.

High Risk Environments

Encompassing all of these areas is an awareness of high risk environments. Knowing where and when certain types of attacks are likely to occur.

Typical environments include car parks, the fringes of busy areas where they transition into quieter areas and getting money out from an ATM at night.

Alertness can Deter


An awareness of these environments will heighten your alertness to appropriate levels at the appropriate times and places. Simply being alert can be enough to deter most attackers as an attacker wants to find a low risk target where the risk of injury or of being caught is low.

Being aware of your surroundings is an important trait to develop. A high level of awareness will give early warning of possible threats. This early warning will do two things.

Firstly, it will prevent you from being caught by surprise. This is a MAJOR factor. Surprise will turn the best cage fighter into a frozen startled mess. Surprise will do that to almost anyone. It is very difficult to recover from surprise with a half competent attack. Time in the encounter and pressure testing in training are the major factors and a continued attack will make it very difficult.

Secondly, noticing a possible threat early will give you time to plan. Appropriate actions can be analysed and options can be considered. It may be best to leave the area, go into a shop, go into the kids room and lock the door, call the police, wind your window up on the locked car door or any number of things. You will not have that luxury of early action if you have not detected the threat early.

The Alpha Male and the Predator

There are basically two types of attackers. One is the Alpha Male and one is a Predator. Anyone who has watched any wildlife documentaries will instinctly know what I mean by this.

•The Alpha Male wants to beat down anyone it sees as a threat. This is typically seen in fights out the front of pubs. Young aggressive males.

•Predatory attacks are ambush attacks. This is the type of attack used by someone after a wallet or money, all the way up to kidnapping, rape and murder.

Basically all types of attack are one of either these two. It is important to know the differences .

Know what to Look for


Knowing the attackers tactics and key indicators is another important area of the pre attack stage. An attacker will generally try to position himself in an advantageous position or already be waiting there and it is important to know this so as to know what to look for.

There are also behavioural signs which can indicate that a person may be about to attack or is looking for a victim. There is a lot of information out there regarding this. VAN HAS REFRENCED THIS REPEATEDLY.

De-Escalation

Once someone has selected you and decided to have a go, and you are unable to leave the area, the next step of an actual attack is when he approaches you. This is where the de-escalation strategies come into it, such as non aggressive posture, and verbally talking and diffusing the situation. There are a numerous strategies for this stage of conflict which may be found here .

If this part of the process does not get resolved or deteriorates further, we move onto the next stage...

The Attack Stage

The second stage of an attack is the Attack Stage. This is the stage in which most people spend ALL their time training in. This is where the actual attack is under way. It is physical.

From the beginning of an encounter, perhaps the best approach or techniques and tactics to use, are those that come from Reality Based Self Defence (RBSD) systems or RMA deals primarily with the pre attack and the first immediate actions to do once the encounter has gone physical.

This enables a seemless transition from pre attack into attack and this is where RMA systems excel. RMA use various scenarios which can be scenarios inside a pub on a friday night, home invasion, robbery or anything. Scenarios can range from the most likely to most dangerous.

Its all about Initiative and who has it!

The beginning of an attack or encounter will give the person with the best initial response the initiative. Who has the initiative has the advantage. At this stage, who has the element of surprise pre attack, or initiative at the beginning of the physical attack, will have a massive advantage.

RMA - Practice in an open system of no rules at all and win at all costs methodology (including using improvised weapons) which is what is needed if it gets to this stage.

When Fight Skills come into it

But what happens if your counter attack or pre emptive attack doesn't work? Keep going of course. But if this happens and the attack can't be stopped quickly, any advantage had by an aggressive start and initiative will be eroding rapidly.

Once an encounter lasts longer than several seconds, fight skill comes into the equation. From here, someone who was caught by surprise can begin to regather themselves and sort themselves out and bring there game into play. This is where the combat sports and related systems come into their own.

Combat Sports

The combat sports are by their very nature competitive systems such as Mixed Martial Arts (MMA), Muay Thai, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Boxing, Judo and some Filipino weapon systems. These systems routinely practise and compete against another resisting human being. This is a major factor in the success of a medium to long term encounter.

Practitioners of these systems have an understanding of how humans react to certain moves or pressure as they do it all the time.

In an environment where both practitioners are mobile, they can resist offensive moves, use strength, use the opponents strength against him, bait him, feint him and generally engage with each other in an "alive" manner. It is the opposite of static.

Train against a 100% resisting opponent safely
These training systems allow for almost full on, 100% effort against each other in a safe, controlled environment. This is an absolutely vital aspect of low tech combat. This is why there is such a great advantage to practitioners of these systems the longer an encounter goes on.

It is your practise of these combat sport systems which will be the major contributing factor in your success of an encounter at this longer length. It is your real fighting skill that will determine the outcome at this stage of what is now a fight. It is no longer an attack. You are engaged in a fight. There is nothing else to fall back on except outside intervention or your attacker quits his attack.

RMA v Combat Sports

Of note, generally most people espouse either RMA or the combat sports. It is generally one or the other.

The RMA community say that it uses realistic scenarios where there are no rules, weapons are encouraged, along with multiple attackers where they are under adrenal stress. This is how it's gonna be. :wink:

The MMA community say that you need to train against a resisting opponent who is actively trying his hardest to fight back using everything they have.

They Compliment Each Other

By what I have already stated above, I believe both systems are equally important and have something to offer each other. The RMA crew can implement more 'force on force' or free sparring type activities and the MMA crew can implement multiple attackers, scenarios and weapons. They can complement each other well. This is happening already around the world. People are combining systems in a very effective way. 8)
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"Your Clothes Give Them to me .......Now"

Postby robb buckland » Sat Feb 27, 2010 1:17 pm

Street Gear ...Tactical Pants
:D
Whether you just want to look hip at your next range meet or you genuinely have use for the latest in purpose-built “operator” clothing, the new Vertx pants (referred to sometimes as Vertx tactical pants or low-profile tactical pants) are the way to go.

Vertx is a new offshoot of Arc’Teryx, which itself has made a huge splash in the LE/military world with products such as the Marine Corps’ new ILBE.

Last year, Arc’Teryx was approached by some experienced tactical team personnel about designing a replacement to the 5.11-style pants that had become ubiquitous in the LE, military, and shooting communities. After all, the 5.11 pant was originally made by Royal Robbins and found its first major foothold among law enforcement with FBI’s Hostage Rescue Team. Now years later, every swinging pistol on the planet has a closet full of them.

The idea behind the new design was a more casual, lower-profile appearance that made the pants more suitable for everyday wear, along with some simple product improvements. For example, the pockets are designed to keep your gear — whether it’s your handcuffs, your secret spy decoder ring, or just your wallet — from falling out without the need for flaps and snaps. The material is just flexible and stretchy enough to allow you full range of movement. Joints are articulated and stitching is extremely high quality.

The pants became the cornerstone of the new Vertx line that made its public debut at the SHOT Show. However, some very high-profile units have already been issuing the new Vertx pant with great success and satisfaction among the team members.

The irony, of course, is that just as the Royal Robbins/5.11 pant was originally intended to provide BDU-like capabilities without screaming NINJA!, the Vertx pant will almost certainly come to inherit that mantle once it goes from being the new low-profile choice of professionals to the cool look-at-me choice of everyone.

But regardless of whether you want to be low-profile today or look cool next year, the Vertx pant is definitely the new standard in practical clothing. :wink:
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Appreciate your mentors.... by Joe Lewis

Postby robb buckland » Sat Feb 27, 2010 11:35 pm

In the course of my 35 years teaching Martial Arts, one thing has always been a constant, the
inevitability of change. Many of my fellow instructors, when faced with a new challenge, remain
apologetic and initially surrender to preexisting systems of teaching. My tendency has always
been to change it and do it my way, preferring to ask for forgiveness after the fact. This has
always been my nature. Fortunately, over the years this persona has allowed me to be first at
many things. The following is a partial list.

It is not an easy task to always be the first to accomplish something. However, when you are the
first, you will always be remembered. I am reminded of the great hydro-electric dams that have
been built throughout this century. There are great dams in the world which are over 900 feet in
height. Yet we all remember the very first of these great dams, and that is Hoover Dam. In order
for me to have accomplished the above things for which I will be known as the first, I owe a
great deal to my instructors.
It is important, as a martial artist, in learning how to do great things, one must remember that
sometimes a star has to play less than a starting or a starring role. This is true of many sports. It
is always a team effort. My instructors taught me years ago that whatever your endeavor, to
always understand that in your pursuits every resource available is brought to bear.
As an instructor, the rewards that this message brings will always mean a lot to you, but it is
going to mean a lot more to your students. Someday the time will come as it did for me when
you will find yourself maybe standing next to that one special student, and you will become the
only person in the world to make a difference in that person’s life. And for you to be able to have
the means to motivate that special student to accomplish that extra step in his life, you need to be
qualified.

An instructor does not owe each of his students his very best, but he does owe it to them to at
least make the effort to do his best. I remember always my instructors, starting in Okinawa, and
why my relationship with them paid off. There was a certain knowledge, a certain magic, a
certain tradition, and a certain spirit that each of my instructors possessed. They had gifts. Each
of these gifts enabled me to live my dream, to go beyond my initial goal, which was just to be a
good black belt.

Kinjo Chinsaku gave me my first black belt promotion. He only spoke two words of English, yet
he was able to bring out the greatness in me. He had deep appreciation for my talents in spite of
the language barrier. I remember his essence. I call it “class.” He gave me my “class” as a
fighter.

My first instructor was Eizo Shimabuku. He taught me tradition. He gave me my background,
my history, my heritage in the Martial Arts. He also provided me with the best crop of black
belts for learning on the planet. He taught me how to fight and to always put my best foot
forward, never to miss a workout; always come to class first and always leave last, and to respect
your seniors. He also promoted me to black belt.

Seiyu Oyata was my third karate teacher. Oyata taught me how to be sneaky, to ambush, to never
trust what your eye sees. He taught me instincts. He taught me how to be mean. He was big for
an Okinawan, and he loved fighting. He added a toughness to my spirit.

My next karate instructor, Gordon Doversola, taught me style. I love the Chinese style of his
system, Okiwana-Te. He taught me smoothness, circular movement, camaraderie, how to
appreciate Asian foods, and Chinese weaponry. He taught me culture appreciation, and a great
deal about healing the body, and introduced me to mental energies, a psychical level of combat.
He showed me balance, not only in combat, but in my teaching skills. He taught me to appreciate
the art, aside from the combat aspects, and katas.

John Korab taught me how to train harder than any human and how to fight by never allowing
yourself to quit. He taught me about pain tolerance, stress tolerance, and mental toughness; that
defense was the key, strategy was important, and your game plan was only as good as your
ability to execute. He taught me how to motivate myself and to motivate others, and how to help
the weak to feel accepted in the karate school. Mostly, he taught me to think and made me
appreciate the value of always raising my bar.

Bruce Lee taught me to use my abstract intelligence, and most importantly, he taught me to
conceptualize all aspects of martial arts. I learned the value of fighting principles and combat
tactics. I learned to perceive weaknesses and strengths in my fellowman, not only in combat. I
learned the value of family in the martial arts. He taught me how to outthink your fellowman.
And the most important mental gift was learning to strengthen your entire attitude by properly
focusing. He was a true Master and a Master Teacher. He introduced me to the supreme
importance of being a great teacher. He taught me a great deal about why it is important to teach
others properly; to be fit, not only as a fighter, but also as a instrutor. :wink:
Last edited by robb buckland on Sun Feb 28, 2010 9:01 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Postby AAAhmed46 » Sun Feb 28, 2010 6:59 am

This is an excellent thread. Hell it should be stickied.
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Welcome to the fold!!!

Postby robb buckland » Sun Feb 28, 2010 12:55 pm

:D
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Postby Van Canna » Sun Feb 28, 2010 5:57 pm

Excellent post indeed. :D

One suggestion Robb...

When posting 'long' ... it makes it easier on readers if the long post is broken down into Paragraphs.

Easier to follow without readers' fatigue...and easier for the brain to process and assimilate each concept within.

You may wish to edit.... I think it would have greater impact.

Thanks,

:)
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Sorry Van fixed it !!

Postby robb buckland » Sun Feb 28, 2010 9:03 pm

:D Do ya think I'm posting like I speak..... :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
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A you tuber writes ..........

Postby robb buckland » Sun Feb 28, 2010 9:42 pm

Dear Mr. Buckland,


I appreciate your comment on my youtube kickboxing vid. I also appreciate you putting your name to it. A quick google turned up your website & email.


I used to be much better at this, and probably would have at least done a tat better in round 2 had I not had a mild pneumonia that night (never know when I'll get another opportunity here so I couldn't pass it up). But either way, it was an opportunity for a good self-assessment to see where I stand relative to where I've been and where I want to go.


I started in Limalama under a fellow named Sal Esquival back around 1980. After some years of that I dabbled in many different things (Shotokan, Muay Thai, TKD, Kickboxing), mostly just traveling from one gym to the next (depending on the day of the week) to fight with whatever they had going on. That lasted up till my mid 20s. Since then work & whatnot slowly chipped away with workouts getting fewer and further between & commitment slowly dying. (comfort takes a toll when you let it set in doesn't it).


When I turned 40 I figured I should either get it back now while I have some chance, or just pack it up and forget about it. Its been a harder road back to fitness & quickness than I expected, but its coming along. My walking around weight was 200 in that fight (6ft 4in). Hopefully when everything comes back together properly I'll be walking around at ~190


Anyhow, aside from saying thanks I wanted to ask if you would mind explaining the term you used "blading?" I think I have some intuition about it, and I'm unfamiliar with it in particular.


All the best,

James Byron Nelson
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the road back

Postby robb buckland » Sun Feb 28, 2010 9:45 pm

Hey Byron ,
As we get older the battle to make training opportunitys occur with any regularity is a battle that is fought and lost by alot of us '40 somethings' as is the tendancy to become the 'fat cobra', :lol: .
You are already ahead of the curve by getting off the couch !!!

"An aroused passion is the greatest emotional attribute of ones' fighting spirit".

RE : Blading

Avoid standing squared up (shoulders open) while either in front of an opponent or in the pocket. Common sense tells you that if your shoulders are open , you not only present an easy target for your opponent to hit , but it is dificult to fully rotate your hips through the center line to generate any power . Point your lead shoulder and toe towards your opponent.



Enjoy the road back your only as old as you feel :lol:
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Atm safety

Postby robb buckland » Mon Mar 01, 2010 1:48 pm

Physical Security at ATM's

by Jim Corn 8) ........edited by Robb buckland :wink:




Security at ATM's falls into two areas whether it is an enclosed ATM or one that you drive up to.



1. The first thing you must do is bump your awareness level up when you go to use an ATM. Look around, check your surroundings, are there suspicious characters around or in line behind you? Does the overhead lighting look like it has been sabotaged? If anything trips warning bells in your head go to another ATM.



2. Don't establish a pattern of using the same machine all the time... they are watched.



3. There are two ways that you can be robbed when using the machine. The first is when you are forced to the machine and made to use your pin number either at gunpoint or knifepoint. At this point you have the same options as when confronted on the street by a thug with a weapon. You either feign compliance and wait for an opening, or you launch straight into an attack on the Kyusho Points of the head, bypassing the weapon as you go in. Or you comply and as you go to hand him the money drop it as a diversion for your attack. If you can't create an opening or none seems to present it self then compliance is an option to consider until something presents itself.



4. One of the other dangerous times is when you have already entered your code and are waiting for all that green stuff to drop. This is the time when your level of alertness should go through the ceiling. Scan left and right and behind you constantly. In an enclosed ATM set your body angle where if someone hits you with a rush from behind that it won't pin both arms. As you are typing in the number pause in the middle of typing for a second and scan left, right, and behind and then finish the typing. If you are attacked in this enclosed place then you still have options. Remember that in a tight place you won't be able to draw your arms back far enough to throw that BIG punch. But that's ok; Some of the best strikes in closed in area the size of a phone booth are forty five degrees and down to any center line point of the body ;"in the kitchen". .If they have long hair grab it and dig your knuckles into the Gallbladder Points on the head and use the releasing of the neck to slam his head off the surfaces of the enclosed ATM until you can gain some room to get away or deliver other techniques. Whatever you do, do it with accuracy, speed and RUTHLESSNESS.


5. Any time you have to use an ATM or come out of a bank or shop your awareness level should be on high alert. One of the ways to do this is to start scanning (looking) left, right left right as soon as you exit. Another good way is to visualize in you mind what you would if THIS happens; role-playing is a must all the time. In this way you are preparing the subconscious for the possibility of trouble at an ATM. Stay Aware! :D
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Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 01, 2010 4:23 pm

Good post.

Though with a bit of forethought...you should not ever need to use an ATM. :wink:
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