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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 4:47 am 
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This is a great article by Mas Ayoob, of Lethal force Institute, where Jim Maloney and I trained also under the guidance of the great John Farnam.

http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/ayoob87.html

As we train, we need to familiarize with these concepts so as to trigger the appropriate response action, once having assessed the potential threat.

Never make the mistake of thinking yourself as 'invincible' because of your training or how big and strong you might be, because you'll never know who you might come up against.

Yesterday two Boston park Rangers were stabbed by a homeless man.
Quote:
The wounded rangers were identified as 46-year-old Albert Hurd, a 22-year veteran, and James Lunnin, 25, who joined the rangers this year. Authorities said the older ranger is in the intensive care unit at Massachusetts General Hospital, where his condition has been upgraded to serious. [he was stabbed in the abdomen]

Lunnin was treated and released.

Hutchinson, who stands 6-foot-1 and weighs 290 pounds, has a history of bizarre and violent behavior, including unprovoked attacks on strangers and law enforcement, and episodes of savage biting, court records show. As of 2013, the records show, Hutchinson had 17 convictions — and even more arrests.


Think for a moment about such a crazed 290 pounds assailant coming at you with a knife...none of which you expected.

Then think about any assumptions you may have about your training and who you perceive yourself to be.

Image

Quote:
“We run up here, we see cops, just like, bleeding,” said Jackson Marchant, who was walking nearby when the stabbing occurred. “A lot of people were helping the cops. But he was stabbed right in the central stomach, and it was bloody, it was bleeding, his whole torso was covered in red. He was holding himself, praying.”

The wounded ranger continued praying as he was loaded into an emergency vehicle, Marchant said.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 4:52 am 
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Ayoob
Quote:
People have been hurt—sometimes by strangers, sometimes by people they knew and loved—when they failed to realize that the other person was experiencing a level of hostility that was about to boil over.

Being able to recognize body language associated with imminent violent action can allow you to, in the best-case scenario, disengage and leave the scene. At worst, it can give you time to activate a plan of self-defense soon enough to effectively protect yourself and those for whose safety you are responsible.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 4:55 am 
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The eyes, it is said, are the windows to the soul. Often, the way in which a hostile person looks at you can be a predictor of what his plans are for you.

Cops, soldiers, and mental health professionals are all too familiar with "the thousand yard stare." This is the person who seems to be not so much looking at you as through you. He may be unresponsive or inappropriately responsive in other ways. What this should tell you is that in this moment he is in an alternate reality of his own, a place where you are probably not welcome.

The opposite of the thousand yard stare is the "target stare." This is the guy who narrows his eyes and glares directly at you. The narrowing of the eyelids does for our vision what shutting down the f/stop on your camera does for the lens: it enhances depth perception. It tells you that you have become a very intense focus of his attention. If the circumstances indicate that this individual is at all hostile, the target stare is not a good sign.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 4:56 am 
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There is also "target glance." Cops learned the hard way over the years that if a man casts a furtive glance in a certain direction, he may well be checking his avenues of escape: his quick look has just told the officers where he is likely to run. Is he staring at your chin? In a hostile situation, he's not admiring your Kirk Douglas chin cleft and he hasn't noticed a zit you missed this morning in the mirror. More likely, he's thinking about sucker punching you right "on the button." If his eyes go down to your crotch, he's probably not a gay guy scoping out your package...more likely, he's actively considering opening the fight with a kick to your crotch.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 5:04 am 
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Do yourself a favor and keep reading the article...it may well save your ass being thrown behind bars someday because you will be able to articulate the reasons for any action you might have had to take due to a 'precognition' of impending grave bodily injury and or fear of death.
Quote:
A decade ago, I was an expert witness on the defense team for a police officer who was tried for murder after he shot and killed a man who attacked him, beat him, and tried to snatch his gun and slay him with it.

A key factor in winning his acquittal was that he was able to articulate that before he was attacked, he recognized his assailant's distinctive gang tattoos and correlated that knowledge with his remembered training, which had taught him that inner-city gang members often trained themselves how to disarm and murder police officers.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 5:42 am 
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The body alarm reactions are also worth revisiting on this page. I have talked about this at great length in the past years...

When we perceive some danger signal to our safety and well being...our 'lizard' brain_ takes over with hard wired alarm reactions...
the mind goes through different stages that have physical implications on ones actions.

Depending upon how the situation begins to unfold we will be seized by
Threat Anxiety, Survival Stress, and Combat Stress. The more severe the perception of danger, i.e., hulking opponents, armed opponents, multiple opponents etc., the more intense these body alarm reactions will be.

Once this has been triggered, the body goes into the fight or flight decision reflex, which is either to fight for self preservation or flee for self preservation.

The Autonomic Nervous System at this point engages the flight or flight option, and causes the Sympathetic Nervous System to release adrenaline hormones into the system.

This happens instantly.

Blood pressure starts to increase, the heart beats faster, the digestive system slows down and pupils dilate. Blood vessels start to constrict in the extremities to divert oxygenated blood to the large muscles groups and organs.

As the blood flow is diverted, the hands can become numb and with the added adrenaline that is now being pumped throughout the body, fine and complex motor skills are lost.

Peripheral vision and auditory senses can be reduced or completely lost.

Often when people are questioned after a deadly situation, they cannot describe anything other than the threat directly in front of them and cannot remember any dialog.

Other effects that maybe encountered are: loss of near vision, loss of night vision, loss of depth perception, inability to focus, inability to process information, loss of memory and the inability to make rational decisions.

Keep these things in mind as you train and place reliance on certain 'dojo floor' assumptions.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 5:57 am 
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It is a deadly mistake to think that the average dojo floor student ... faced with a potential life-threatening encounter is likely to respond in cool calm ways as it is believed.


The average person who's never been involved in a real dangerous conflict cannot fathom the mental and physical stress that occurs, when the survival instinct gets tripped.

The survival reflex is not a matter of personal "courage" or lack thereof. It is a profound and complex physiological event designed to prepare the animal within to either fight or flee for its life.

Among the temporary consequences of the adrenaline dump are sudden surge in gross muscle strength, increase in speed associated with increased muscle strength, and insensitivity to pain.

These changes enhance basic animal fighting skills, so they may be useful in a hand-to-hand brawl. "The fight or flight response has not changed since caveman days, when people fought with their bare hands or with clubs and rocks,"

But, Mas Ayoob advises, "there is a downside to this....you will experience gross, severe, dramatic, cataclysmic loss of fine motor coordination. Dexterity falls through your ass....The hands will begin to tremble."

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 6:21 am 
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As to any kind of self defense training...Mas Ayoob feels the need to train to minimize the degree to which one is dependent upon fine motor coordination as opposed to gross muscle coordination.

Impaired Thinking. One's very "ability to think in a rational, creative, and reflective manner" is likely to be reduced or perhaps eliminated under mortal threat conditions.

This "will generally cause a massive block of the brain's ability to process thought functions." The inability to process thought functions rationally and reflectively will have an obvious effect on one's ability to clearly sort out whether the situation is appropriate for the use of various degrees force.

Tunnel vision is a loss of peripheral vision. For example: "Your field of vision may narrow to mere inches and you may lose your depth perception and your ability to see what is behind the threat."

Thus, tunnel vision makes the defender concentrate so much on the perceived immediate danger by one attacker that he may not see other "bad guys" on his flanks or behind or near to the person he is concentrating on.

Keep this in mind when you are practicing bunkai drills against 'multiple opponents'...

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 2:44 pm 
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My hearts and prayers are with both officers.

It's a shame BPD had to take the man to jail. They should have taken him to the State House, which is right there near the site of the incident. It's the State House, ultimately, that allows that violent crazy man to be free on the streets.

Just saw a quick clip this morning on the local news, looked like from a cell phone. The older officer had his ASP out, was originally holding it high, but lowered it to his side - just as the guy attacked him.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 3:11 pm 
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I hear you Otto.

And I kind of wonder why Rangers are not allowed to carry guns, yet they are exposed to lethal dangers.

It is also my understanding that rangers are trained in tactical self defense...but I wonder if approaching this guy with a knife was the right thing to do without calling for back up.

The assailant has quite a history.
Quote:
Umbro is one of several people who have crossed paths in recent years in violent, bizarre incidents with Hutchinson, who allegedly stabbed two park rangers in Boston Common Tuesday afternoon.

In Umbro’s case, his encounter took place as he was grabbing his breakfast at the McDonald’s restaurant at Newmarket Square, just around the corner from the headquarters for his family-owned construction company, Umbro and Sons Construction.

It was around 7:30 a.m. on Feb. 22, 2013, when Umbro saw a large man suddenly and violently attack a woman.

“I saw him punching this girl,’’ Umbro said. “The other patrons weren’t doing much. There were a lot of people younger and stronger than me that could have done something, but they didn’t.’’

Umbro, who is 5 foot 8, could not stand by. “I thought, the torment I am going to face the rest of my life is going to be worse than any beating this guy is going to throw at me,” Umbro said. “That was somebody’s daughter.’’

By the time Umbro reached Hutchinson, the burly attacker had delivered a second blow to the woman, who later told police she was sipping her morning coffee when Hutchinson attacked her without provocation.

Umbro grabbed Hutchinson by the head and pulled him away from the woman. Hutchinson, who police records put at 6 foot 1, 290 pounds, turned his violence onto Umbro. “We were going at it in the middle of the restaurant,’’ said Umbro, who described himself as “street smart.’’

Umbro said the two of them exchanged blows as Umbro tried to wrestle Hutchinson toward an exit door. Blows were exchanged between the two men when, Umbro said, “my forehead lined up with his mouth.’’


Here's another example of how vulnerable we are in 'closed quarters' battle with someone...like having your face bitten off.

I recall a case years ago, when I was investigating a robbery at the Brockton Fair, where a police officer had his nose bitten off by a punk who latched on to him.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 3:13 pm 
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Quote:
Umbro retaliated with a series of “palm shots’’ to Hutchinson’s nose, but with little obvious effect. And then suddenly Hutchinson grabbed hold of Umbro’s hand.

For the second time, Hutchinson started biting.

This time, Hutchinson kept biting down, and kept biting down on Umbro’s hand.

Umbro said he could not pull his hand free from Hutchinson’s mouth — so he started pushing his thumb into the husky man’s eye. [b]“I had to jam my thumb into his left eye socket,’’ [/b]Umbro said. “That’s the only way I could get this crazed animal to release my hand.’’

Umbro said Hutchinson broke off the fight and ran away while he went to his nearby office, got into a truck with his son and went looking for Hutchinson. Police, meanwhile, arrived at the restaurant and started their own search for him.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 3:16 pm 
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Umbro, who is 5 foot 8, could not stand by. “I thought, the torment I am going to face the rest of my life is going to be worse than any beating this guy is going to throw at me,” Umbro said. “That was somebody’s daughter.’’

By the time Umbro reached Hutchinson, the burly attacker had delivered a second blow to the woman, who later told police she was sipping her morning coffee when Hutchinson attacked her without provocation.

Umbro grabbed Hutchinson by the head and pulled him away from the woman. Hutchinson, who police records put at 6 foot 1, 290 pounds, turned his violence onto Umbro. “We were going at it in the middle of the restaurant,’’ said Umbro, who described himself as “street smart.’’

Umbro said the two of them exchanged blows as Umbro tried to wrestle Hutchinson toward an exit door. Blows were exchanged between the two men when, Umbro said, “my forehead lined up with hhis mouth.’’

Hutchinson, Umbro said, started biting him on the forehead.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 3:20 pm 
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Quote:
When it was over, when Bodio S. Hutchinson’s hands were handcuffed by Boston police, Joseph Umbro ignored the blood spilling from the bite wound on his forehead, forgot the blood pouring from the bite wound on his left hand, and asked Hutchison why he had attacked a woman.

“Instead of answering me in words, he growled like a lion. Like a bear. No words at all. Just RAGGGHHHH!’’ Umbro said in a telephone interview Wednesday. “He had this crazed, animalistic look on his face. I will never forget it.’’


This incident has lots of lessons for us students of a martial arts.

I wonder if anyone reading this could articulate what those lessons might be.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 3:38 pm 
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Here's something from Marc Mac-Young's page that is very educational.

http://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/violencetypes.htm

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 3:51 pm 
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As I was reading this thread, I thought, "You want to give me a uniform and a badge, but no firearm?" The way I figure, I'd rather panhandle than take that job.
So I looked at the Park Ranger website and found this -

"Training for Massachusetts Park Ranger Jobs – New Massachusetts State or city park rangers must complete training at the Massachusetts Ranger Academy or the Seasonal Ranger Academy, depending upon the type of job. The location of this training will also depend on the nature of the job; for example, Boston park rangers will attend the Boston Park Ranger Academy Training Program. The main training academy for state park rangers in Massachusetts is located in Amherst. In addition, in Boston only, park rangers must complete Special Officer training and maintain that license, allowing them to legally carry a sidearm.

Additional training required for this job includes First Responder and CPR certification, as well as possession of a current, valid lifesaving or waterfront certificate."

Now I'm thinking, WTF?

This is their website - http://www.parkrangeredu.org/massachusetts/


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