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 Post subject: Developing precognition
PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:04 am 
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Always of interest when applied to our need to sense what's about to befall us.
I like what Sammy Franco writes
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Before launching your first strike, you must assess the source of danger. Who is posing the reasonable threat? Is it someone you know, or is he a complete stranger? Is it one person or two or more? What are his intentions in confronting you?

Pay very close attention to all available clues, especially nonverbal indicators. Your answers to these important questions will shape your overall tactical response.

There are five essential factors to consider when assessing a threatening adversary: demeanor, intent, range, positioning, and weapon capability.

The Adversary

1. Demeanor. What is the adversary's outward behavior? Watch for both verbal and nonverbal clues. For example, is he shaking, or is he calm and collected? Are his shoulders hunched or relaxed? Are his hands clenched? Is his neck taut? Is he clenching his teeth? Is he breathing hard? Does he seem angry, frustrated, or confused? Does he seem high on drugs? Is he mentally ill or simply intoxicated?

What is he saying? How is he saying it? Is he making sense? Is his speech slurred? What is his tone of voice? Is he talking rapidly or methodically? Is he cursing and angry? Remember that all of these verbal and nonverbal cues are essential in accurately assessing the assailant's overall demeanor and adjusting your tactical response accordingly.

2. Intent. Once you have assessed the adversary's demeanor, you're in a much better position to assess his intent. In other words, why is this person confronting you? Does he intend to rob or kill you? Is he trying to harass you?

Is he seeking vengeance for something you have done? Or is he a troublemaker looking to pick a fight with you? Determining the assailant's intent is perhaps the most important assessment factors, but it also can be the most difficult.

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 Post subject: Think about it
PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:07 am 
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Real life and street confrontations, do not foresee regulated, ritualistic movements. The only type of “preparation” that we can codify as “universal” is the rediscovery of our reactive instincts that lie dormant in us all.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:11 am 
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Sam Franco
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Does A Reasonable Threat Exist?

To determine if a reasonable threat exists, you must accurately assess your situation. Assessment is the process of rapidly gathering and analyzing information and then accurately evaluating it in terms of threat and danger. In general, there are two factors to assess before launching a first strike: the environment and the adversary. Let us start with the environment and its related elements.

THE ENVIRONMENT

Since a street fight can occur anywhere, you must quickly evaluate the strategic implications of your environment, which is made up of your immediate surroundings, such as a street corner, parking lot, football stadium, golf course, grocery store, gas station, the beach, etc.

There are six essential factors to consider when assessing your environment. They are: escape routes, barriers, makeshift weapons, terrain, positions of cover, and positions of concealment. Let us take a look at each one:


1. Escape routes.

These are the various avenues or exits that allow you to flee from the threatening situation safely. Some possible escape routes are windows, fire escapes, doors, gates, escalators, fences, walls, bridges, and staircases.

2. Barriers.

A barrier is any object that obstructs the assailant's path of attack. At the very least, barriers give you some distance and some time, and they may give you some safety - at least temporarily.

A barrier, however, must have the structural integrity to perform the particular function that you have assigned it. Barriers are everywhere and include such things as large desks, doors, automobiles, dumpsters, large trees, fences, walls, heavy machinery, and large vending machines.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:12 am 
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Franco
Quote:
3. Makeshift weapons.

These are common, everyday objects that can be converted into offensive and defensive weapons. Like a barrier, a makeshift weapon must be appropriate to the function you have assigned to it. You will not be able to knock your assailant out with a car antenna, but you could whip it across his eyes and temporarily blind him. While you could knock your assailant unconscious with a good, heavy flashlight, you could not use it to shield yourself from a knife attack. Makeshift weapons can be broken down into the following four types: a) striking, b) distracting, c) shielding, and d) cutting.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:13 am 
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Franco
Quote:
4. Terrain.

This is a critical environmental factor. What are the strategic implications of the terrain you are standing on? Will the surface area interfere with your ability to fight your adversary?

Terrain falls into one of these two possible categories: a) stable terrain- principally characterized as stationary, compact, dense, hard, flat, dry, or solid ground, and b) unstable terrain - principally characterized as mobile, uneven, flexible, slippery, wet, or rocky ground.

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 Post subject: Franco
PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:14 am 
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Quote:
5. Positions of cover.

A position of cover is any object or location that temporarily protects you from the assailant's gunfire. Some examples include large concrete utility poles, large rocks, thick trees, an engine block, the corner of a building, concrete steps, and so on.

Positions of cover are important not only because they protect you from gunfire but because they buy you some time and allow you to assess the situation from a position of safety.

When choosing a position of cover, avoid selecting the following objects because bullets can penetrate them: a) internal doors, b) small trees, c) car doors, d) all glass windows, e) dry wall, f) tall grass, g) trunk of your car, h) overturned tables, i) trash cans, j) shrubbery, and k) fences.

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 Post subject: Franco
PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:15 am 
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6. Positions of concealment.

Quote:
These are various locations or objects that allow you to hide from your adversary temporarily. Positions of concealment are most commonly used to evade engagement with your assailant(s), and they permit you to attack with the element of surprise. Positions of concealment include trees, shrubbery, doors, the dark, walls, stairwells, cars, and other large and tall objects.

WARNING: Do not forget that positions of concealment will not protect you from an assailant's gunfire.

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 Post subject: Franco
PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:18 am 
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Positioning.

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This is the spatial relationship between you and the adversary in terms of threat, tactical escape, and target selection. In street combat, it's important to understand the strategic implications of the assailant's positioning before and during the fight.

For example, is he standing squarely or sideways? Is he mounted on top of you in a ground fight? Or is he inside your leg guard? What anatomical targets does the adversary present you with?

Is he blocking a door or any other escape route? Is his back to a light source? Is he close to your only possible makeshift weapon? Are multiple assailants closing in on you? Is your assailant firing his gun from a position of cover or concealment?


I find the above very crucial to think of and practice in dojo scenarios/\.

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 Post subject: Franco
PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:19 am 
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Weapon capability.

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Always try to determine whether your adversary is armed or unarmed. If he is carrying a weapon, what type is it? Does he have an effective delivery method for the particular weapon? Is he armed with more than one weapon? If so, where are they located? There are four general points of concern when assessing the assailant's weapon capability, including hand/fingers, general behavior, clothing, and location.


Hands/fingers .

Quote:
When strategically scanning your adversary for weapons, quickly glance at his hands and all his fingertips. Can you see them? Is one hand behind him or in his pockets? If you cannot see his fingers, he could be palming a knife or some other edged weapon. Remember to be extremely cautious when the assailant's arms are crossed in front of his body or when he keeps his hands in his pockets.

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 Post subject: Franco
PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:21 am 
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General behavior .

Quote:
How is the assailant behaving? For example, does he pat his chest frequently (as a weapon security check)? Does he act apprehensive, nervous, or uneasy? Or does he seem to be reaching for something? Is your assailant's body language incongruous with his verbal statements?

Clothing. What the assailant is wearing can also clue you in on what he may be concealing. For example, is the assailant wearing a knife sheath on his belt? Could there be a knife concealed in his boots?

At other times you may have to be a bit more analytical. For example, is your assailant wearing a jacket when it is too hot for one? Could it be to conceal a gun at his waist or shoulder? Could he be concealing a gun or edged weapon.

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 Post subject: Franco
PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:23 am 
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Location . Does the assailant seem suspiciously rooted to a particular spot? Or is he running back to his car, possibly to get his gun? Is he close enough to grab that beer bottle on top of the bar? How far is the assailant from a makeshift weapon?

Don't Stereotype Your Adversary

It is important to consider that the person you must strike first may not fit your stereotype of a dangerous adversary. I know of several people, for example, who erroneously imagine that they will be confronted by a "typical scumbag" - a loathsome, contemptuous, male of another race.

But what if your adversary turns out to be a clean-cut, business executive of your own ethnic background who menacingly waves his fist in your face?

Will you be able launch a first strike without trepidation?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:25 am 
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Quote:
There are a variety of types of assault that you may be subjected to and statistically some happen more often than others, the habitual acts of violence.

Therefore, it should be possible to rank all assaults in order of the most likely to occur to the least likely to occur. For example, which is more likely to happen in a street scenario; someone attacks with a right hand swinging punch or with a side thrust kick?

Of course the punch is much more likely. The top probability attacks and their range are the ones to which we should focus our training since they are the ones we will likely have to defend against.

The most probable attacks are techniques such as grabs, pushes, pointing, gesturing, etc. Many of these attacks escalate from simple verbal attacks to physical assault.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:29 am 
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I use to see three guys kicking the crap out of one in the washroom. You let all 4 in a few hours earlier they're best buds, a couple of hours later it's one of them is doing the six boot two step in the piss and puke. It opened my eyes to the real world, you can not lose, cause you just might.

We had to escort a customer off premise now and then…..like every half hour. I'd get off at 3 am and then discover that a few of these patrons had decided to wait for a chat by my car. I learned a few things watching guys do the six step boot step.

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 Post subject: Franco
PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 6:43 am 
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Quote:
Your ability to exert and maintain maximum effort will last no more than 30 to 60 seconds if you are in above average shape. After that, your strength and speed may drop by as much as 50 percent below normal. When all is said and done, you don’t have much time in a street fight, so the battle needs to be won fast before your energy runs out.

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 Post subject: Proper breathing
PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 5:37 pm 
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Here is something else from Sammy Franco that is interesting:[quote]

Proper breathing is another substantial element of the compound attack , and there is one simple rule that should be followed:

Exhale during the execution phase of your strike and inhale during its retraction phase.


There is a very good reason why Franco wrote that. He wants us to use “forced breathing” in order to stay “pressurized” and avoid oxygen debt.

He recommends breathing in a controlled rhythm as per above.

He also suggests that “wind sprints” to improve recovery breathing, become an important part of training.

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