The #1 street attack

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Re: The #1 street attack

Postby f.Channell » Thu Jul 14, 2011 7:25 pm

I'm not encouraging anyone to use the jumping kick in competition or the street. I certainly would not on the street unless I was just trying to get through someone to escape from a bad corner or position. I fear my jump kicking days may be behind me. :lol: It is just fascinating to see it used in a context that we are all familiar with; and see it work. I was also watching his hands closely, does it appear to you that he did a hand fake that dropped the guard of Couture?
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Re: The #1 street attack

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jul 14, 2011 8:25 pm

Right on Fred, I agree...and all this is nothing but banter as you know :wink:
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Re: The #1 street attack

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jul 16, 2011 3:43 am

f.Channell wrote:Part of the problem in the scenario in seisan bunkai is that unless the person has trained in grappling they are shooting half heartedly or ineffectively. Elements of the seisan bunkai can be useful if the sprawl is taught along with the follow up counters.

I think the technique is useful although I often add a guillotine choke. This is what I tended to do in Judo when attacked this way, often by BJJ guys that had switched to judo. Of course the knee strike was not allowed.



There are so many ways of looking at all this with so many diverse teachers' opinions…which is only natural.

Here's something from Marcus that I find of interest as many others will, I am sure
If you want to learn to survive a grapple you got to learn how to do at least the basics properly .

A sprawl can be easily extrapolated from Uechi kata, if you get principles and know how to squint, but I always think it is easier pulling things back to your base than it is magicking them up.

You can extrapolate the opening of Sanchin to a sprawl; it's great as it is for a bear hug, getting their hips and centre away from yours.....

Same principle in a sprawl except because he goes low you go over him and to maintain a straight alignment your legs must go back.

The non sport grapple guys won't frown on putting those double thrusts into the upper back/neck and jarring the reptilian brain huh.... I actually a long time ago read an article of John Blummings (9th Dan Kyokushin and 9th Dan Judo) advocating some of his fighters to do just this when he was discussing what he considered real NHB fighting.

Now that's interesting.

But then it comes down to how to practice for the real world, and here, again, opinions are legion.

Fred writes that that unless the person has trained in grappling they are shooting half heartedly or ineffectively in Seisan Bunkai.

It is obvious that if we practiced at 'street speed and power' we would not last long on the floor and will suffer some 'damage' _ as Fred points out > that unless the person has trained in grappling they are shooting half heartedly or ineffectively. <

And here this from Marcus
Folks who do it well [the shoot] change level without really bending at the waist, they just lower via the legs and stay vertical, can be hard to even sprawl against these guys if your are not light on your feet, and it gives them so much lifting power that you will go down hard.


The reason why I sometimes tell my students to forego the sprawl and use our basic footwork we see in our Kanchin kata/hojo undo…that can work wonders sending the 'shooter' down on his face.

And this from Marcus really hits home for me
The links and roots are there , no one should be afraid of addressing the HAPV looking outside the square when needed and then bringing it back to your daily practice.


Right on the money, Marcus.

Back to the training, the least we can and should do…and it can be done safely…is to practice to ingrain concepts and principles when working our Bunkai from seisan….because such Bunkai is closer to street's habitual acts of violence…then any other drill we do.

Once ingraining the principles of defense, which will vary from 'foot-working away' to 'short stopping' where appropriate…in Bunkai applications_

I then use the HAPV list of Pat McCarthy ….which we have posted on the dojo wall…someone with eyes closed will place a finger on the page and see what HAPV gets chose for more serious street practice, using more power…and attempting to make the Uechi techniques relate to defensive response action based on the previously practiced principles and concepts.
The links and roots are there , no one should be afraid of addressing the HAPV looking outside the square when needed and then bringing it back to your daily practice.
Marcus.

There you have it.
The best way to stay on your feet is to understand the ground game, of that I'm sure _
Fighting has always been a continuum, specialists better be very special.
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Re: The #1 street attack

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jul 16, 2011 4:55 am

Then there is the type of attacker we are likely to be up against:
Type of Attackers:

intoxicated stranger: wild flurry of punches

sneak attacker: sucker punch from all angles

experienced street fighter: tough, aggressive person who fights habitually (little fear/much experience/quick-strong-adaptable/takes offensive and thus offers openings

chargers: rush and tackle - high kickers

gang: intent to ground and kick opponent

attacker armed with blade or stick-type weapon

martial artists/boxers: more predictable than untrained attacker but potentially more dangerous because of skill/experience

after the fact attack: beaten/frustrated attacker resumes attack and/or employs handy object as weapon

excited delirium: attacker under influence of drugs (crack cocaine/PCP/methamphetamine anabolic steroids etc) or mental illness: impervious to pain, increased strength and speed, irrational
_ McCarthy

So we are all ready to handle any of these fighters of the streets with our training :wink:
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Good footwork will defeat any attack

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jul 16, 2011 1:45 pm

Interesting article from police one_

http://www.policeone.com/police-product ... e-Tactics/
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good technique for the bus

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jul 16, 2011 2:24 pm

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Re: The #1 street attack

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jul 17, 2011 2:00 pm

In these discussions of attacks/defenses …as always…it is hard to dismiss what Rory writes as it relates to the ways _we would…would not…be successful in defending ourselves…considering the details of real violence that our training rarely prepares us for.

Example: In a fight, even though the intent of the attacker is not to kill you…he will be delivering as much force and commitment to your body and not 'feeding you' a technique…or setting up 'layered combinations' and footwork dances to create an opening in between your blocks.

The attacker is beating you down, his 'defense' being that he is doing so much damage to you so fast that you cannot think beyond that overwhelmed by momentum, chaos, shock from his hits to your body parts…that you cannot condition.

This is how an assault works.

As to body and limb conditioning…yes, of course we must do it for a number of reasons we all know about…but the mistake will be to 'rely' on it in a confrontation in a disproportionate mind set. Here what Larkin writes does make sense
The point is this: the human body can be trained to handle
trauma to a specific area under CONTROLLED conditions. This has
nothing to do with creating injuries. Take away the controls...
and chaos reigns.

That's why attempting to control the uncontrollable is a very
poor use of your time.


To think that we, because of our dojo workouts, will be able to control the uncontrollable under the grip of the chemical cocktail and natural chaos of a fight…is not very good mental practice.
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Re: The #1 street attack

Postby NEB » Sat Aug 06, 2011 7:58 am

Question:

I don't know anyone in law enforcement. I don't imagine you can walk into the local Five-O and ask the person at the desk if you can interview a cop ..... or can you? How do you go about getting into a one-on-one with police personnel if you don't know anyone?
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