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 Post subject: The Five Bare Bones
PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2014 3:48 am 
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A great read here...

http://www.tactical-life.com/combat-han ... to-reveal/

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 Post subject: Re: The Five Bare Bones
PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2014 3:55 am 
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This is why I’ve come to advise Lethal Force Institute students to stick to five bare-bones statements when questioned.

First, “This man attacked me.” It makes clear from the beginning that you’re the Victim and the guy you were forced to shoot was the Perpetrator.

Second, “I will sign the complaint.” You’re speaking the cop’s language, and further locking in the facts of who’s who and what’s what: you are the Good Guy or Gal, and the guy on the ground is the Bad Guy.

Third, point out the evidence. If you don’t, it can disappear or get moved. In Case Eight in Illinois, a gangbanger attacked a cop and tried to rip his Smith & Wesson 9mm out of his holster and murder him with it. The cop wound up having to shoot and kill him in self-defense. Not until I got there to examine the evidence for trial did anyone bother to examine the uniform pants the officer was wearing; they were torn in the holster area, confirming the officer’s version of events. By then he had been charged with an illegal homicide, and had to go all the way through trial to win acquittal.

Fourth, point out the witnesses. Their words may well exonerate you, but the general public fears reprisal by the genuine criminals who attacked you, or their accomplices, and may be reluctant to come forward on their own. The only way to be sure that testimony that may exonerate you will be taken, is for you to point out to police the witnesses who saw you shoot your attacker in self-defense.

Fifth, and critically important, “Officer, you’ll have my full cooperation after I’ve spoken with counsel.” Stick to that like name, rank, and serial number. Experts tell us that it will be a minimum of 24 to perhaps 72 hours before you’ll be in any condition to deal with a full interrogation. And that interrogation (the more politically correct term “interview” is used now) should not take place until you’ve discussed it with your attorney in depth.

Nor should it take place, in my opinion, without the attorney right there with you, and a legal stenographic service’s camcorder rolling to record it for your side, just in case.

Bottom Line
Cops are trained to get guilty people to say incriminating things they didn’t really want to say. The same tactics can get innocent people to say things that someone erroneously convinced of their guilt could use against them, particularly when they are interrogated in the hugely stressful immediate aftermath of having faced death and been forced to extinguish a human life.

This is why virtually all of us who are involved in this sort of thing on a regular basis advise that the justified shooter should not submit to a detailed interview until they’ve had time to come down from the stress flood and acquire legal counsel.

At the same time, saying nothing means that your story, the truth, is not being told. Cops see so many criminal uses of force that, when they don’t yet know who’s who, it’s only natural for them to assume that the guy on the ground is the victim and the guy standing with the smoking gun is the perpetrator. That’s why, at this moment, it is wise to get across the five points suggested above, and then shut up and wait for an attorney.

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 Post subject: Re: The Five Bare Bones
PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2014 4:20 am 
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Rick Wilson told me about this book by Marc McYoung...that is supposed to be the very best on self defense he has ever seen...

http://www.amazon.com/In-Name-Self-Defe ... B00LIBWADA

Book Description

Publication Date: July 2, 2014

Quote:
The cell walls seem to close in as he buries his head in his hands. The same thoughts repeat over and over in his fogged mind: It all happened so quick. One second I was getting out of my car, the next he was attacking me. Now I'm being charged with manslaughter! How did this happen? It was self defense . . . wasn’t it?

Prison is filled with people who thought they were defending themselves. Just saying, "It was self defense" isn't enough. When you claim self defense you are basically confessing to a crime. To keep you from being convicted you must provide evidence your actions remained within certain boundaries and you acted with just cause. That's assuming you stayed inside legal boundaries and acted within reason. If you didn't . . .

Now . . . are you sure you know what constitutes actual self defense? If the honest answer is no, then this book is an absolute must-read!

In the Name of Self Defense: What It Costs. When It’s Worth It. will challenge what you think you know about self defense. It's an in-depth exploration of what is and what is not self-defense. Both in the streets and in the eyes of our judicial system—and where most people go wrong. Using the information contained in this book could mean the difference between you laying in a parking lot, legitimate self-defense or prison!

This book presents information unlike any you've seen before, focusing not only on the aftermath of an incident, but on what commonly leads to violence and your actions before, during, and after. Learn about the limitations of real self defense, how to accurately assess a situation and concisely “articulate” the timeline of events to officers and legal professionals in a manner that reduces the chances of a misunderstanding . . . and a subsequent prison sentence.

Whether you want to add to the knowledge you acquired as a beginner in a self-defense class or you’re an instructor looking to further your own knowledge or a professional whose job requirements place you in potentially violent situations with dissatisfied clients or customers . . . it doesn’t matter! In the Name of Self Defense is a must-read for everybody! If you're lucky, you will never need the information contained within these pages, but if you ever require it what you learn from this volume will be vital.

Author and self-defense expert Marc MacYoung takes you on an entertaining journey through these lesser known (and some never-before-broached) aspects of self defense. MacYoung helps readers understand how to avoid violence, how to use the appropriate amount of force if it happens, and how to present the facts in a way that self defense is clearly understood and judged applicable to that situation. With a witty sense of humor and fifty years experience in a plethora of violent encounters coupled with a montage of experts in his corner, MacYoung delivers a thought-provoking examination of the world of self defense and protecting yourself legally after being forced to protect yourself physically.

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