Good talk on blocks

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 19, 2018 1:51 pm

antony »

I started shooting at a very early age. I has shooting skeet and trap at age 6. I was hunting pheasant and other game. I had a .22 before that. Maybe I got started too young, but I NEVER, did anything that was remotely wrong with a gun. I always knew to run to an adult if another child had a gun.

Of course this didn't stop the neighbor kid from shooting me in the back with - get this- my own BB gun as I was running to tell his mother that he had taken my gun and wouldn't give it back.

I think the 2 big things are take away the curiosity and make huge penalties if an infraction occours.

I had my guns in my room, I knew where my fathers guns were, I had access to the ammo -- but I never touched anything unless I checked with dad.

I could take the gun off the rack and clean it or just hold it but never with a cartridge. My dad took me shooting often and that allowed me to control my urges.

I knew what the gun would do and how much fun it was. I didn't want it to end so I abided by the rules. The other big factor was being scared to death of what would happen if I set the old man off.

He always reminded me of what he would do and it was a scary thought.

I think alot has to do with your family structure and what your relationship is with your kids. The big thing now is not what your child will do but what will their snot nose peers do if they find the gun in your home. You will be held liable. You cannot count on other parents raising smart kids.


Maybe you should keep the guns out until the little guy or girl is able to actually get in trouble. Put the real guns in the lockup and make the rules clear on what to do if the child sees a gun laying around.

Then make a point of not touching the guns, and maybe leave a toy gun around as bait so you can test the child. If the child fails, a stern talk and punishment should follow. It's all training. Praise is a much needed aspect of responsibility. Consequences are the other half.


Make a certain time for you and the child to share the gun world. Get some books and show them how the thing works. Show them how the bullet moves and what the powder does. Show them it is a machine, like a car and can be fun or deadly. I think if the child identifies with weapon with a great time with dad, they will wait for dad.

antony
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 19, 2018 10:12 pm

Harvey »

The first three forms of iaido start from ground positions, because one never knows when he might have to draw his sword from a sitting position.

This is similar to the Van Canna philosophy that created the small room in Brockton with no light and no air in stifling summer heat: one had to be prepared for an attack without warning in a steam room without light.

Torture chamber is an accurate description of the confined space in which Van conducted his four hour class.

T.C. also stands for torque and compress. And it could be an echo of t'ai chi, since it utilizes the same principles. As Bob Campbell said, years ago, all of the circular styles are related.

Everything comes from compressing and expanding, weighting and unweighting around the center line. Arms and legs are arrows, but the body is the bow.

The "torture" adjective also characterizes Van's style of teaching. He does not let us get away with anything. At the end of the form, he says, " do x movement again. . . That is what I thought.

Try it this way, with more explosive power." After ten minutes of hard work, he says, "now do the kata over." If you fix the error he caught, but make a new one, you get to go through the process again.

You begin to pay much more attention to every movement.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 19, 2018 10:18 pm

Scott Sonnon

In personal combat, deploying violence -- or the credible threat of violence, which requires the apparent willingness to employ it - compels us to accept the will of the opponent, or for him to accept ours.

It is always to this fact that combative reality returns:

combat is a clash of wills, and he who imposes his will upon the other is victorious. Violence is the critical ingredient of personal combat, and its immediate outcome is bloodshed, suffering, and trauma.

Whilst the magnitude of violence may vary with the objective of the assailant, the violent essence of personal combat remains immutable.

Any study of personal combat that neglects this characteristic is misleading and incomplete. Being that personal combat is a violent enterprise, danger is a fundamental characteristic.

And since personal combat is a human phenomenon, fear - the human reaction to danger - has a significant impact on the conduct of personal combat, and should be the prime requisite in determining a program of preparation.

Why? All men feel fear. Proper combative preparation must foster the courage to manage fear and forge ahead through the din of combat, for fear shall either be the excellent servant of our survival or the terrible master of our demise.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 19, 2018 10:21 pm

Scott Sonnon

Courage, or moral force, is not the absence of fear; rather, it is the virtue of effective anxiety management.

Since it is true the old saying, "Courage comes after...," all preparatory efforts must attend the climate of fear. Personal combative programs must study fear, understand it, and be prepared to effectively use it to the individual's advantage.

Experience under attack generally increases courage, as can realistic training by increasing the familiarity of the individual to the effects of anxiety management upon combat performance.

Effective anxiety management programs should develop internal cohesion and esprit de corps, for as said by Napoleon, "the moral are to the physical forces as three are to one."
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 19, 2018 10:23 pm

Scott Sonnon

Personal combat is characterized by the interaction of both moral and physical forces. The physical characteristics are generally easily seen, understood, and measured; the moral, less tangible. ("The term moral as used here is not restricted to ethics -- although ethics are included -- but pertains to those forces of psycho-physiological rather than tangible nature.)

Moral forces are difficult to grasp and impossible to quantify. We cannot easily gauge forces like resolve, conscience, emotion, fear, courage, morale, leadership, and esprit.

Yet moral forces exert a greater influence on the nature and outcome of personal combat than do physical. This is not to lessen the importance of physical forces, for the physical forces in personal combat have impact on the moral.

Because moral forces are intangible and elusive, it is tempting to exclude them from personal combat preparation. However, any doctrine or theory of personal combat that neglects these factors ignores the greater part of the nature of personal combat.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 19, 2018 10:25 pm

Vince McConnell

Fears originate in the same ways in all people, but they will manifest in unique fashions according to an individual's identification to the self-image, and the threat to that image. Fears are not overcome with greater effort, resistance, or self-abuse whether verbally or otherwise.

Most psychological techniques taught by self-help experts actually exacerbate the very bondage that you seek freedom from; they teach you to become a more comfortable prisoner rather than lead to the escape.

In Body-Flow, you will learn how to detect the perpetrators that prevent your freedom, and impede your performance.

And, you will also discover that how you see yourself through other people; close friends and family's eyes may very well be the wall preventing your true nature from shining through.



Body flow is by Scott Sonnon
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 19, 2018 10:28 pm

Body-Flow does a better job of explaining the liability of your flawed self-image than any of the pop-psychology experts in today's media circus.

You learn that certain attachments, or fixations, that are learned over the course of your lifetime are the culprits for your inferiority complexes, and subsequent compromised psychophysical function.

Body-Flow's manner of explaining the why's and how's are quite different than typical pop psyc books in that the information empowers you with tools to implement rather than leaving you with a sense of coping with your inadequacies, at best.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 19, 2018 10:29 pm

It has been said that to find the greatest potential in this world all you have to do is visit a graveyard.

Body-Flow will reveal to you how you can circumvent that occurrence in your own life by releasing those learned hindrances of "fear-reactivity," and unleashing the giant within by getting into the "body-flow" of that is the universe's nature.

One of life's greatest tragedies is allowing your innate talent and wisdom to die untapped.

No matter what your life's purpose or goals, you already possess all that is needed for that journey to arrive at its destination.

Unleashing your body-flow is worth the time -- any time.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:41 pm

Rory Miller writes
Violence is NOT Danger

Fear of danger is not the same as fear of conflict.

The chemical cocktail, the adrenaline rush from climbing or skydiving, is completely different from the affects of conflict.

A near collision driving feels different than public speaking, asking someone for a date or asking the people talking in a theater to be quiet.

In the interpersonal interactions your social standing, your very identity, self-image and place in society is at risk.

Not just your life, but your self.

In climbing or kayaking, the fear is for your life, but it is affirming for your identity.

Violence threatens both, and that is one of the reasons the effects can be so long term.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:46 pm

GSantaniello »

In contemplating various emotional state of being, i would question the chemical compostions of Fear Management, Anger Management, and of course Stress Management.

As all three of these conditions appear to effect simular physiological & emotional changes that given enough time of manification, often can put us on the edge. Where as those who "loose it" react with physical action and we read about them.

Sometimes "Fear" may keep one resistant to respond in physical action. Then again, with enough fear present, pre-conceived notion of potention harm to oneself can cause pre-empted action.

Experiencing much work related "stress" in recent days due to inventory, short staffed coverage and overworked employees subjected to high demanding management, there has been tension resulting in verbal escalating.

As a result of such tension, it often leads some to become somewhat physically challenging where as even myself find a desire to want to resort to that human instinct of violence.

With "stress" turning to "anger" it is easy to see how things could go one step further. When they do, we now have "Rage" that often becomes very physical.

So how similar are these three conditions, Fear, Stress & Anger ?

As most of us do experience one or more of theses emotions from time to time. ..Some, do to work, personal relationships, health conditions, environmental conditions etc.
Do have to balance ourselfs with these emotions that cause physiological changes within.

I've heard it said that as black belts, especially advanced ones, we are viewed diferently and "expected" to have more control over such conditions.

Years of study in confidence, respect and discipline should help us to not be affected as the rest of society. However, i personally think that we are still like others when it comes to reacting to these situations. Only that we possibly may "control" ourselves a little better ?

Van, as you mentioned, there is always some jerk around. At times for those of us who deal with multiple employees and customers, with so many personalities, our need to control both emotional and physiological changes within is almost a daily challenge !

Any thoughts on the subject ? How many actually do "not" get upset in situations or feel that blood rise or that "adrenal" surge wanting to respond to it ?

Gary S.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:48 pm

Gary,

You wrote a very critical and sobering post, something that is always at the bottom of people’s minds, but gets denied and shoved under, because it makes them uncomfortable.

You wrote
Any thoughts on the subject ? How many actually do "not" get upset in situations or feel that blood rise or that "adrenal" surge wanting to respond to it ?


The short answer is none. The reactions you outline are “hard wired” although some people manage them better than others.

Body alarm reactions will run a wide gamut, to include raw fear, depending on the threat level.

I have investigated examples of this in workplace violence, something that is always a possibility where you work.

Recall that I told you; I was a “specialty” investigator for the self-insured department of the company you work for, on contract with my employer.

Training hard in martial arts, tactics, strategy, and weapons continuum, is not enough in spite of the traditional mumbo jumbo that it will prepare one for all contingencies.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:50 pm

Having knowledge of the physiological and psychological affects of fear, along with access to a range of fear management techniques is a critical area of self-development that should blend with our traditional element.
The core concept is: "Know Fear", not "No Fear". Being fearless denies you the use of a valuable sensory mechanism designed to enhance our safety and survival. A lack of fear increases your risk of potential harm.


Knowing fear, that is, understanding how you react to fear (shakiness, tunnel vision, elevated heart rate and blood pressure, etc.), as well as how a potentially violent individual may react to fear (verbal aggression, menacing postures, threats, etc.) can help you predict and prepare for the emotional consequences of addressing a potentially violent situation.


This pretty much sums it up. Problem is many deny this aspect, thinking of themselves as above it because of some kata, conditioning, drills, and free fighting.

All of this help, of course, but it is not enough, in spite of our trying to sell it as such.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:51 pm

If one is not prepared to deal with the intense fear and emotional discomfort generated by confronting a threatening individual or situation, then he/she is not fully prepared to intervene in a potential workplace violence incident, such as it happened in one of my cases, when an office manager came under attack by an irate coworker, or to address a truly serious street confrontation with one or several attackers.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:53 pm

Confronting an angry or potentially violent person in the workplace or on the street is frightening while at the same time feeling a righteous and anger driven force to engage.

This causes the inner conflict you outline so well.

Many persons, and this includes trained martial artists [although they don’t like to hear this, in spite of serious evidence to the contrary] have found themselves overwhelmed and immobilized in the actual moment of truth.

For all of their training and preparedness, most of these people have never anticipated their own emotional response to the acute anger and rage that they encountered during a real-time event.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:55 pm

The usual response to this is
“well, I was attacked a few times, and my karate training served me well”


Sure it did, but against what kind of attack? And would it work again? Was luck involved? Or is it just a story we are telling.

The idea is to become skilled at fear management.
Fear management is based upon understanding, accepting, and channeling fear so that it becomes an ally and not an enemy.

Knowledge, preparedness, support, and specific anxiety management techniques are the four pillars upon which successful fear management strategies are built.

I would like to see professionals in this aspect of training come on down to our summer camps.
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