Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 21, 2018 12:48 am

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 21, 2018 10:45 am

Hi Paul,

This is a good alternative:

Ippon Kumite

A good progression drill, from prearranged kumite to more realistic engagement, is the Ippon kumite.

I did a particular "testy" version of it once at Walter Mattson's dojo, where the Okinawan masters were teaching.

Yonamine sensei led the group drill by placing the defender in a spot on the floor and fanning out the class around him.

Then each would take turns in random attacks from all sides.

We used to do this in the old days at the Mattson academy _

Too bad it went by the wayside.

Think of
the one step drills not as EASY BLOCKING drills, but as DIFFICULT
ATTACKING drills. That ought to open up a whole new world for you
when doing ippon kumite. Get past the block.

Use speed, timing, and
trickery (if you have you, sneeze on them first). Your sparring world
will open up for you...and you will have taken the first step into
semi free sparring.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 21, 2018 10:47 am

It's the attack that is being trained, not the stupid block counter
thing.
Most karate styles DO teach the "one-two,block-counter" method of dealing
with an attack - to beginners. That's something one grows out of.
I don't
think any art is fairly represented by the techniques that are practiced
by novices.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 21, 2018 10:52 am

The smart way to train:

Sometimes
this takes the form of a simultaneous block and counter, sometimes
it takes the form of what a fencer would call a "stop hit", sometimes
it is a "block" which is *really* a limb destruction technique or
an unbalancing/throwing technique, and sometimes it takes the form of
avoiding the attack with body shifting.


If a student does not learn body shifting/evasion/reposition techniques...the moment he comes up against a burly attacker, he will be squashed like a bug, despite blocking dreams...best block/don't be there when the train is coming for you.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 21, 2018 10:54 am

The most advantageous _ma_ai_ [a *very* subtle Japanese term that
encompasses the entire spatial relationship of opponents in an
encounter] is generated by placing the opponent in sight and
simultaneously getting out of the opponent's sight.

If you
simply move back from attacks coming from the front, you give
an opening to the opponent's attacks. In other words, the more
you move away from the opponent's attacks, the more you will
be busy defending yourself from him.

Therefore, you must be
skillful in shifting yourself from side to side so that you
can get out of your opponent's sight, placing him in your
sight and making an opening to counterattack.

For offensive
purposes, body shifting must be done in accordance with the
opponent's attack. An attack immediately after the body
is shifted is effective and powerful.


The man said...
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 21, 2018 10:57 am

Streetfighters for the most part do not rely on self-defense or fighting
ability but on the raw emotion to overwelm their victim. In most cases
it is the fear that defeats the victim and allows a streetfighter or
mugger to win.

Karate or any martial art that has some degree of mental
training can help with this immensly. To slap a persons ears, to hit a
persons throat, to grab and crunch a person's groin doesn't take any
special knowledge but it does take a relaxed but alert mind that can
find these openings.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 21, 2018 10:59 am

f.Channell »

Van,
I teach that drill, everyone forms a circle around the person and I give everyone a number. I randomly call out the numbers, the last two are 2 numbers at once.

It's also fun to have them close their eye and react to a grab of a collar or arm.

I did one years ago where you have 3-4 people line up against the wall and opponents attack with one technique, if it gets through you replace them, if they counter successfully they stay in their position.

Kind of a king of the hill, they also have to agree between themselves what happened. I taught that once at the Buka.

With the kids I like to play Shoguns gold, where one child protects the treasure (samurai) and the other kid (ninja) tries to get through them, they fight twice as hard to get that gold as they do when they spar, get the gear on them.

This can be done striking as well as grappling.
Breaks up the typical class and is a lot of fun.
F.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jun 22, 2018 12:20 pm

One problem we have as teachers, I think, is that if we can do certain things/like power hitting/free sparring skills, etc. from an individual's personality/body attributes/etc.,

we expect/expound/demand...or criticize a main student body made up of average people/ if they cannot do what we can do, whatever that may be good or bad...

Only because some of us can perform certain ways, it does not mean all our students will be able to do the same.

I have seen this behavior over the long years and it is one sure way of losing students, especially when a teacher keeps on showing off his own capabilities which as they are displayed on a dojo floor and not in a street fight...they are not really that reliable.

We may also find that some students without 'our skills' end up doing better than us in a street fight.

And Rory Miller writes that if a teacher, who gets tagged by a student in class, resorts to 'teaching him a lesson' if capable of doing so...is nothing but an ass*hole as it goes to operant conditioning.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jun 22, 2018 12:30 pm

And because of my work experience in these matters_ I also feel that for a teacher not to address the legal aspects and the ways of preparing for them, while purporting to teach 'self defense' or simply a style of fighting...without adjusting his teachings to that invisible 'second enemy'...amounts to negligence.

And I believe there have been some cases where the teacher was held liable/criminally and civilly.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jun 22, 2018 10:04 pm

The lesson for the concealed carrier, he says, is that in a self-defense case, “your past will become your present.”

You’ll be held accountable for any fights you’ve had in the past, any feud with a neighbor, any threat made, any post on Facebook. In Gasser’s case, it was particularly devastating because his prior road rage incident so closely resembled the events that lead to the shooting of Joe McKnight.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 23, 2018 6:54 am

Go here for an excellent thread by Rick Wilson

viewtopic.php?f=2&t=22852
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 23, 2018 2:38 pm

I have got the Power

In some of the posts by Rick Wilson and Paul G. on the other threads...we see how easy it is to believe that 'we got the powers' from the practice of some martial art we deem to be sacrosanct.

Here is something about the laws of power...some of you may enjoy reading...

https://oliviergoetgeluck.wordpress.com/48laws/

Law 1: Never Outshine the Master
Always make those above you feel comfortably superior. In your desire to please or impress them, do not go too far in displaying your talents or you might accomplish the opposite – inspire fear and insecurity. Make your masters appear more brilliant than they are and you will attain the heights of power.


If you are more intelligent than your master seem the opposite: Make him appear more intelligent than you. Act naive. Make it seem that you need his expertise. Act naive.

Your master must appear as the sun around which everyone revolves, radiating power and brilliance, the center of attention.


~~

Law 2: Never put too Much Trust in Friends, Learn how to use Enemies
Be wary of friends-they will betray you more quickly, for they are easily aroused to envy. They also become spoiled and tyrannical. But hire a former enemy and he will be more loyal than a friend, because he has more to prove. In fact, you have more to fear from friends than from enemies. If you have no enemies, find a way to make them.


“Do I not destroy my enemies when I make them my friends?”
– Abraham Lincoln

The friend is rarely the one who is most able to help you; and in the end, skill and expertise are far more important than friendly feelings.

Keep friends for friendship, but work with the skilled and competent.

Without enemies around us, we grow lazy. An enemy at our heels, sharpens our wits, keeping us focused and alert.



Consider yourself lucky if you have enemies...if not...go out today and make some real quick :mrgreen:
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 23, 2018 2:40 pm

Be wary of friends-they will betray you more quickly, for they are easily aroused to envy.
well isn't this a balls buster.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 23, 2018 9:53 pm

Law 3: Conceal your Intentions

Keep people off-balance and in the dark by never revealing the purpose behind your actions. If they have no clue what you are up to, they cannot prepare a defense. Guide them far enough down the wrong path, envelope them in enough smoke, and by the time they realize your intentions, it will be too late.


Our first instinct is to always trust appearances. This fact makes it relatively easy to conceal one’s intentions.
Simply dangle an object you seem to desire, a goal you seem to aim for, in front of people’s eyes and they will take the appearance for reality.
Once their eyes focus on the decoy, they will fail to notice what you’re really up to.

Hide your intentions not by closing up (with the risk of appearing secretive, and making people suspicious) but by talking endlessly about your desires and goals – just not your real ones.

The best deceivers utilize a bland and inconspicuous front that calls no attention to themselves.
They know that extravagant words and gestures immediately raise suspicions. Instead, they envelop their mark in the familiar, the banal, the harmless.


“The world wants to be deceived.”
– Soren Kierkegaard
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Jun 23, 2018 9:55 pm

Law 4: Always Say Less than Necessary
When you are trying to impress people with words, the more you say, the more common you appear, and the less in control. Even if you are saying something banal, it will seem original if you make it vague, open-ended, and sphinxlike. Powerful people impress and intimidate by saying less. The more you say, the more likely you are to say something foolish.


“Not enough.”
“Is this the best you can do?”

A person who cannot control his words shows that he cannot control himself.

“I shall see.”
– Louis XIV

Power is in many ways a game of appearances, and when you say less than necessary, you inevitably appear greater and more powerful than you are. Your silence will make other people uncomfortable.

Humans are machines of interpreation and explanation; they have to know what you are thinking.

When you carefully control what you reveal, they cannot pierce your intentions are your meaning. Your short answers and sentences will put them on the defensive, and they will jump in, nervously filling the silence with all kinds of comments that will reveal valuable information about them and their weaknesses.


“I learned that you actually have more power when you shut up.”
– Andy Warhol

“The longer I keep quiet, the sooner others move their lips and teeth.”
– Han-fei-tzu, Chinese philosopher

Reversal
It is occasionally wiser to imitate the court jester, who plays the fool but knows he is smarter than the king. He talks and talks and entertains, and no one suspects that he is more than just a fool.
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