Roy Bedard and the Quarter Second Rule

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Roy Bedard and the Quarter Second Rule

Postby RACastanet » Fri Aug 06, 1999 1:46 am

I spent one session with Roy sensei last Friday and also had the good fortune to get about ten minutes with him after class. My interest was in disarms and handgun retention. Roy is verrry skilled at both.

Roy demonstrated what he called the 'quarter second rule' - ie. each body action or reaction takes about one quarter of a second. This is the key to disarming a ne'er do well or getting the knockout punch in first in a threatening situation.

Now, if we couple that natural delay with the effect of the 'chemical coctail' should not we always consider being first to act in a bad situation? One other point Roy made was that legally, we are under no obligation to take the first 'hit' in a confrontation. Did I get that right Roy?

Thoughts?

Rich


[This message has been edited by RACastanet (edited 08-05-99).]

[This message has been edited by RACastanet (edited 08-05-99).]
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Roy Bedard and the Quarter Second Rule

Postby Roy Bedard » Fri Aug 06, 1999 2:40 am

Yes - you got it right. Your only obligation is to articulate the reasonable belief that you were in imminent danger of an active assault. This can be done merely by describing the words and body language that the assailant exhibited which caused you to act in defense of yourself or another.

Remember though, if there is a reasonable opportunity on your part to avoid a physical conflict, take that opportunity.It is not only legally required - it is also the wise choice. If not... I recommend you hit fast, and hit hard. Your objective now is to end the encounter.
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Roy Bedard and the Quarter Second Rule

Postby Rick Wilson » Fri Aug 06, 1999 5:51 am

"If there is a reasonable opportunity on your part to avoid a physical conflict, take that opportunity. It is not only legally required - it is also the wise choice. If not... I recommend you hit fast, and hit hard. Your objective now is to end the encounter."

Roy Bedard


This should be printed on a poster.


Thanks,

Rick
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Roy Bedard and the Quarter Second Rule

Postby david » Fri Aug 06, 1999 10:58 am

Well, it's nice to know that I may have acted "legally" in some of the altercations I had in the past. Image

My perception and experience is generally that whoever hits and connects first (provided one knows how to hit with power)is the one often left standing.

I tell folks I train with (and some don't need to be told this), if it's going to "go down" and you can't avoid, hit first and hit hard until the opponent is down and out.

If one is not sure or not ready to act, one should still stay back and be ready because that other person may be thinking: Hit first, hit hard...

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Roy Bedard and the Quarter Second Rule

Postby Roy Bedard » Fri Aug 06, 1999 2:36 pm

I should further elaborate on this quarter second rule for the sake of discussion since our time was so limited at camp.

'Reaction time'is in direct relation to the clarity of mind at the time a stimulus is presented. The quarter second rule applies to the cognitive process of perception, analyzation, planning, and motor initiation.
Stress level plays an important role in your ability to react to a threat within a beneficial timing. The quarter second rule can easily turn to one second reaction time or even greater period of time if there is distress.

Directly related to heart rate,there is overwhelming evidence that performance is influenced by the type and amount of stress that the performer is facing.

There is an immediate deterioration of physical and physiological ability when the heart rate increases above approx. 175 BPM (Levitt 1972). At this point, perceptual ability,cognitive processing, motor skill performance and of course reaction time are all in jeopardy. The fastest and hardest hitters will not survive an encounter if they cannot control their heart rate while under attack.

I believe that training to minimize the catastrophic affects of stress is far more important than training fast and powerful techniques (not to minimize the importance of these teachings). Unfortunately, this is much overlooked in our modern dojo style instruction. We should train to maintain our mental focus when a threat occurs,to maintain clarity of mind, and to keep our heart rate at optimum performance levels during the encounter. These are all processes of biofeedback. Look to your kata for instructions on how to do this.

If we are to discuss the reality of defense i.e, hit fast, hit hard, we have to get back in touch with the heart and mind of the warrior. These things, I think, were better understood by the men who lived and died by the quick movement of the sword, but it is not beyond us to uncover the legacy they have left behind.

Roy
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Roy Bedard and the Quarter Second Rule

Postby RACastanet » Sat Aug 07, 1999 3:08 am

Thanks for the reply Roy. I'm going to quote you in class tomorrow.
Regards, Rich
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Roy Bedard and the Quarter Second Rule

Postby Van Canna » Sat Aug 07, 1999 8:15 pm

Roy is a talented martial artist, a gentleman
and a very powerful and focused fighter! I had the pleasure of spending several hours with him discussing the very same subject matter! He is also very knowledgeable on the psychological and legal aspects of confrontations and I wish he would be more visible on my forum! How about it Roy?

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Roy Bedard and the Quarter Second Rule

Postby Roy Bedard » Sun Aug 08, 1999 12:44 am

Thank you for your invitation Mr. Canna. You may not know that I have been following your forum for over a year. I drop in, read the postings and give them some well deserved thought.
However, with the exception of my big mouth on Gary's forum,I usually prefer to listen rather than speak. Gary sent me a private email some time ago asking me to become more involved in his forum. He of course is very busy and he asked that I help stimulate discussion as we moved forward in our tournament endeavors. Gary knows I have great repect for him, as I do for you, and per his invitation I have participated in his forum threads quite occasionally.
Per your wishes I will break my self imposed "vow of silence" and speak up a little more on your forum.
Again, thank you for your kind words and personal invitation.

Roy
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Roy Bedard and the Quarter Second Rule

Postby RACastanet » Sun Aug 08, 1999 1:56 am

I'm looking forward to more input from you Roy. The short time I spent with you was extremely valuable. Today at class I shared your thoughts from this thread and they were apreciated by the group.

Regards, Rich
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Roy Bedard and the Quarter Second Rule

Postby Knight » Sun Aug 08, 1999 3:12 am

"We should train to maintain our mental focus when a threat occurs,to maintain clarity of mind, and to keep our heart rate at optimum performance levels during the encounter. These are all processes of biofeedback. Look to your kata for instructions on how to do this."

Question:
In what sense do kata instruct us in this kind of training?

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Roy Bedard and the Quarter Second Rule

Postby Van Canna » Sun Aug 08, 1999 4:16 am

Thank you Roy! In talking with you at camp it flashed through my mind that you have so much to offer and it would be a shame for us not to share in your police experiences and techniques and psychology of fighting! Your knowledge of the weaponry force continuum would also be extremely well received on this forum!

Regards,

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