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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2006 10:59 pm 
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Why do you suppose this is?

http://www.gendercenter.org/education.htm

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2006 12:03 am 
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-Metablade- wrote:


Well, I'm not particularly impressed with their trend statistics. They're comparing against 1960, when women were still activitly discouraged from going to college much of the time. I would certainliy hope that it's increased since then.

http://www.census.gov/population/www/so ... s2004.html

These are some more recent numbers that also show women enrolling more often than men. I'm not sure what the causes for this are.

Here are some guesses that I have no supporting evidence for:

I suspect that men probably have easier access to job opportunities that don't require a degree, so there's less motivation to go to school instead of working at the gas station/etc.

I suspect that while women now have less of their gender bias against education. That is, women once were told that they should just get married and concentrate on raising the kids, whereas now that's less prevalent. Men, however, still have a stigma attached to activities that are considered unmanly. Reading is for wimps, after all. I think that this kind of attitude might have some effect. To the extent it does it's more about the attitude towards education seen at the grade-school/high-school level.

There's also an extent to which having high numbers of women is a selling point for schools, particularly in science and engineering departments. On the flipside, no school proudly touts how many male students there are in the teaching programs. Overall I don't think a much bias against men in favor of women at the admissions level, but it's at least possible there's some.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 19, 2006 4:13 pm 
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Bias in education against men???!?!?!?!?!? No freakin way dude....

http://www.cs.columbia.edu/wics/women_higher_ed.htm
WOMEN IN HIGHER EDUCATION
Where the Elite Teach, It's Still a Man's World
The women who do get hired at major research universities often find a 'toxic atmosphere'

At first glance, higher education today might seem like a woman's world. Women make up about 60 percent of the undergraduate population, and in 2001-2, for the first time, more doctorates earned in the United States went to American women than to American men, according to the National Science Foundation's "Survey of Earned Doctorates."



http://www.kltprc.net/books/women/Chpt_8.htm
The Status of Kentucky Women in Higher Education
In the past, women typically achieved lower levels of education than men here and across the nation. Here, the author examines the new gender gap, the dramatic reversal of long-standing trends in college attendance and graduation rates by gender. In recent years, young women have begun to enroll in college and complete four-year degrees at higher rates than men at national and state levels. While the academic strengths and pursuits of women differ from those of men, the emergence of higher educational achievement among women may have profound implications for their future status.


o Female students earn better grades than male students in high school.
o Compared to male students, female high school students are more likely to attend college following their graduation.
o Women comprise the majority of students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.
o The baccalaureate graduation rates of women are significantly higher than they are for men.
o Women earn the majority of associate degrees, bachelor’s degrees, and master’s degrees awarded annually.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 19, 2006 4:14 pm 
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http://dailytitan.fullerton.edu/issues/ ... women.html
Percentage of women students increases at CSUF
More than half of the Titan student body are women, according to study

The National Center for Education Statistic’s Web site showed that in the fall of 2001 college enrollment was 15.3 million. Of that total, Men were 6.6 million and 8.7 million were women.

Neither Vura or Bredin are exactly sure why there is an increase of women enrollment, but Bredin said that economy factors may be one reason. (nor do they care?!?!?!?!?!?!?!)

US Census of Bureau, women make up 50.9 percent of the country’s population for 2001 and the projection shows that women will keep on exceeding men in numbers.



PS this is where my wife got her Master in Science in instructional design and technology (and she taught there part time the semester following her graduation).....now she has been accepted to a phd program at FSU in Tallahassee where we will be moving in June (sorry GM)......

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 19, 2006 4:20 pm 
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http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/2005/se ... ator07.asp

Since 1978, the number of undergraduate women in degree-granting 2- and 4-year institutions has exceeded the number of undergraduate men. Since 1970, women’s undergraduate enrollment has increased more than twice as much as men’s. In the next 10 years, both men’s and women’s undergraduate enrollments are projected to increase, but less than in the past 10 years. Women’s undergraduate enrollment, however, is projected to continue growing faster than men’s enrollment.


http://www.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/20 ... 2004b.html
In elementary school, female fourth-graders outperformed their male peers in reading (2003) and writing (2002) assessments. (and that is not a problem!?!?!?!?!?! when boys do less well than girls, no one seems to mind, but if the shoe be on the other foot, we get all excited)

• Females are less likely to repeat a grade and to drop out of high school.
• Differences based on gender in math and science course-taking appear to be shrinking.
• Female high school seniors tend to have higher educational aspirations than their male peers.
• Females have made substantial progress at the graduate level overall, but they still earn fewer than half of the degrees in many fields.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 19, 2006 4:24 pm 
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Whenever women or girls had inferior performances compared to men or boys, there was a masive conspiracy that needed to be rooted out.......Now that the tables are starting to turn against men and boys, I wonder if it is the women in positions of power in educational institutions (who are the majority of teachers??!?!??!!) who are negatively affecting boys self confidence, etc??!?!?!?!?!?!?!??!

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 4:59 am 
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Ok, for the 8,137th time, relax.

Here's hyperbole:

and that is not a problem!?!?!?!?!?! when boys do less well than girls, no one seems to mind, but if the shoe be on the other foot, we get all excited) ... (nor do they care?!?!?!?!?!?!?!) ...l Bias in education against men???!?!?!?!?!? No freakin way dude....

And here's some more bland material from your own source:

"...said U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige. "The issue now is that boys seem to be falling behind. We need to spend some time researching the problem so that we can give boys the support to succeed academically."

Very compelling data from Kentucky (per the source, 48th in the nation in higher education in 1990) notwithstanding, can you promote your important and legitimate issue without shouting?

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