The invasion of Canada

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The invasion of Canada

Postby f.Channell » Sun Sep 24, 2006 6:05 pm

This book The Invasion of Canada 1812-1813, caught my eye when I saw it in the free section of the public library. written by Pierre Berton.
Looking forward to reading about this time of history I haven't heard much about.

Waiting for that first crisp fall day and sitting by the wood stove.

F.
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ahhh

Postby CANDANeh » Sun Sep 24, 2006 6:10 pm

Yes, but we burnt the Whitehouse :wink:
However sadly forgotten USA sailors lay buried almost forgotten on an island in Halifax harbour

"But in this unhallowed ground, forgotten by the country that sent them off to fight, lie the bodies of 188 American sailors and soldiers taken prisoner by British regulars and Canadian colonial forces during the War of 1812.

''No doubt their loved ones wept, but they seem to have vanished from the memory of the US,'' said Guy MacLean, a leader of the Northwest Arm Heritage Association and one of the Halifax residents whose recent fight to save Deadman's Island from development ended up pricking the conscience of American veterans groups and, finally, the US government."

''What started as a very local controversy over this land became a history lesson that reverberated on both sides of the border,''

http://www.usmm.org/halifax1812.html
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Postby f.Channell » Mon Sep 25, 2006 1:06 am

Thanks Leo.

Interesting link and information. I've heard of the island with the treasure buried in it but not this island.
Really not a war I heard much about in school.

25% of my family tree lies rooted in Nova Scotia from a Loyalist ancestor.
The other 25% from the Eastern Townships. Actually Eastman and Magog I found out recently. The rest is Highlander.

I may have to become a Montreal Canadian Hockey fan!

Looking forward to reading the book. Maybe I'll go crack it open.

F.

P.S. I think the Whitehouse is unburnable now. :wink:
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Invasion

Postby JOHN THURSTON » Mon Sep 25, 2006 5:06 am

Further Research reminds me that the first American Invasion (attempts) of Canada were launched in 1775 during the Revolutionary War. I don't have any information at hand regarding the later expedition mentoned.

The 1st expedition was headed by General Richard Montgomery.

The 2nd expedition was formulated and led By Benedict Arnold.

The major components of the expeditions were 14 regiments from New Hampshire, New Jersey and Masachusetts raised under the system of the Time, which employed the raising of Regiments by 'personalties', so to speak.

The regiments included Colonel Morgan's Regiment (of Rifles as I recall) .

Rifleman Tim Murphy, whose life was highlited in the Book "The Rifleman" (no relation to Chuck Connors), was a member of Morgans "Rifle Corps" at the siege of Boston.

I read this book and recall his service at Boston and in the reprisals against Indian Allies of the British on the New York and Pennsylvania frontier.

The latter was a brutal affair responding to brutal and savage attacks on the homes of the Riflemen in their absence.

I do not recall that he took part in either expedition to Canada.

The 1st expedition succeded in capturing Montreal. which the Americans chose not to hold as those forces later joined with those of the Second expedition to attack the then more important and strategic City of Quebec.


The 2nd expedition was headed by Benedict Arnold, promoted to Colonel for the task. The forces of the 2nd expedition subsequently joined with the forces of the 1st under Montgomery,

Both forces were "soundly" defeated at the (second) Battle of Quebec by the British General Carleton.

Among the dead were Montomery and among the prisoners taken by the British were Ethan Allen and Daniel Morgan.

Arnold was wounded. The latter wounding and Arnold's later successes in the War engendered the "Monument to Arnolds' Leg", as a full monument, if you will, 'could not be erected to a traitor'.


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Postby f.Channell » Mon Sep 25, 2006 11:37 am

Benedict Arnold.

West Point would be still called Fort Arnold if not for him listening to his wife.

I wonder how much faster the war would have been won if he wasn't wounded and then betrayed us.

Of course by 1812 they were all 30 years older so I don't know how many fought in both wars.

Militia were raised by a public gathering including much use of rum.
It was almost like a fair or parade in the center of town. If you look at the expense report of a militia unit you will see rum and gunpowder are the two biggest espenses.

By the time they sobered up they realized they had signed on. Militia signed on for a specific battle, not for the whole war. And I'm sure they took some spoils.

Privateers during the Revolution and probably the war of 1812 made $1,000 a month if successful in comparison to $20.00 for a soldier.

This is really how Washington won the Revolution IMHO. He harassed English shipping and upset the rich traders who felt the war in their pocket,

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The Delayer

Postby JOHN THURSTON » Mon Sep 25, 2006 8:31 pm

Hi:

Washington's tactics somewhat remind me of an elected dictator of Rome after Cannae, called "Fabius Cunctator" (the delayer.)

He evaded full field battles with Hannibal, closed and manned the Fortificationsof all Cities affiliated with Rome, harassed Hannibal, eventually cutting his supply line and defeating a relif expedition by Hasdrubal, Hannibal's.

Wahington picked his times (as well as he could) forced the British evacuation of Boston, just prior to the expeditions we discussed.

This was a major victory.

Trenton was a desparate stroke after the winter at Valley Forge.

Subsequenly the Continental Army grew in strength and discipline.

More on this later, a huge topic.

Washington generall disparaged the militias. sometimes they proved him right, and sometimes they proved him wrong.

JT
Last edited by JOHN THURSTON on Wed Sep 27, 2006 4:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby f.Channell » Mon Sep 25, 2006 11:35 pm

The enlistments were running out so Trenton was a last effort to improve moral and get the guys to sign back up. Two men froze to death on the march through a blinding snowstorm. many with no shoes and rags tied around their feet.

I believe he then promised a $10.00 bonus to get them to re-enlist which he didn't have.

Brilliant man General Washington.
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Invasion of Canada

Postby mikemurphy » Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:37 pm

The first expedition actually started with the taking of Fort Ticonderoga in May, 1775 by Col. Ethan Allen and Capt. Benedict Arnold along with 100 Vermont militiamen which defeated the 85 British and took the 79 pieces of hearvy artillery.

The second part of this invasion was St. John, which turned out to be a siege. The Americans, commanded by Gen. Richard Montgomery commanded 2000 men was pitted against Gen. Sir Guy Carleton and Major Charles Preston. Carleton didn't hang around long and moved on to Montreal. In an effort to break the siege, he did try a movement which was thwarted by the Green Mountain Boys and Col. Seth Warner.

The third part of this campaign was Montreal, where Carleton led a composite force of 235 men (British, Canadian, & Indian) against a force of 300 men under Col. Ethan Allen and Major John Brown. Because of a tactical snafu, Carleton attacked Allen's divided command captured Ethan Allen when his Canadian "allies" dropped their guns and ran leaving him practically alone. Montreal was captured anyway by Montgomery when he move his forces from St. John. Carleton escaped to Quebec.

The move on Quebec was in Dec. of 1775 and was an ill-thought out plan. American forces under Montgomery and Arnold numbered around 950 while the fortified British and allies under Carleton numbered 1800. Even if the Americans had been successful, they would have had to face the 4000 reinforcements brought in by Gen. John Burgoyne. Their success would have been short lived. Montgomery was killed, Arnold was wounded, and Capt. Daniel Morgan was captured. A costly mistake for the Americans.


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Thanks Mike

Postby JOHN THURSTON » Wed Sep 27, 2006 4:22 pm

Mike:

Thanks for 'fleshing out" this thread.

I am not familiar the US operations against Canada during the War of 1812, so called.

I will get to it but I know this is also your area of expertise.

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