Hugh's Pride and Joy.

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Hugh's Pride and Joy.

Postby JOHN THURSTON » Thu Nov 29, 2007 4:36 pm

Hi all:

The discussiion only better than resolute dusscussion between two Collector, of varying hi points of interest, having somewhat dissimilar collections is, an Earnest discussion between Martial Artists on variuous techniques, in any event, I found two pictures of the Cinqueda (sp) in two different books. I tried to use the best of the two,

Image
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Postby Hugh » Thu Nov 29, 2007 5:19 pm

Thank you, John. That's quite a handsome beast, a great picture. I do think that the hilt on my Tinker Cinquedea is looks a good deal more comfortable to hold than the one on that one, however.* I should think that the sharp bits midway on the grip would be hard on the hands. They do, however, remind me of the bulges midway on the grips of ancient Roman pugiones. See the Legio XX page on them below:**

* http://www.tinkerswords.com/Page%203.html Scroll down a bit to find it.
** http://www.larp.com/legioxx/pugio.html
Trying to Walk in the Light, Hugh
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Hugh
 
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Good

Postby JOHN THURSTON » Thu Nov 29, 2007 5:32 pm

Always thing about you.

I did that the Bud K Viking apart.

I posted my fingings on another ost and thread.

I can set it forth again here, let me know how you wish me to handle that.

J
"All Enlightenment Gratefully Accepted"
JOHN THURSTON
 
Posts: 2449
Joined: Sat Nov 28, 1998 6:01 am
Location: MARSHFIELD, MA. USA

Postby jorvik » Thu Nov 29, 2007 8:40 pm

I have a picture of one in an old art book with Roman coins for rivets :) ........... 5 finger knives, i.e. the width of the blade, and hence the name 8)
jorvik
 

Postby Hugh » Thu Nov 29, 2007 9:58 pm

You have it, Jorvik. Since carrying swords by civilians was generally seriously frowned upon, if not downright illegal, in most late Medieval cities, I see the cinquedea as being the weapon most likely used by the young Capulet and Montague bravos in the opening brawl in Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet". I will tell you that the more that I play with it, the more convinced I am becoming that it would be one extremely lethal weapon in such a brawl.
Trying to Walk in the Light, Hugh
1 John 1:5
Hugh
 
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Location: Virginia


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