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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2009 7:59 pm 
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I've watched several athletes and karateka (sometimes, not always the same) train when they have various injuries...from sprained or torn knee ligaments to pulled back injury to sprained wrist to minor broken bones, etc.

what are your thoughts on training when you are injured? When should you step out? When should you train, but alter as needed? and when should you just ****** it up?
and why do you answer as you do? (filter took it out, but that word was not offensive and simply meant tough it out...sigh :roll: )

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2009 9:29 pm 
As soon as you feel pain stop, don't train through it.it's just not worth the effort..........I walked around a 9 mile lake with a hip that was "dangerously unstable" :oops: :oops: ........so I know :wink:


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2009 2:48 pm 
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jorvik wrote:
As soon as you feel pain stop, don't train through it.it's just not worth the effort..........I walked around a 9 mile lake with a hip that was "dangerously unstable" :oops: :oops: ........so I know :wink:



ooouuuuuuuuch! Hope you are much better now! Did that exercise in determination :roll: :) cause problems or delay your recovery?

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2009 3:58 pm 
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Depends on the injury.

I try to view injuries as hidden gifts in that they offer an opportunity to explore and grow in areas that maybe often get over looked.

Being forced to work soft can really change the way one works hard.

Or being forced to avoid using a certain limb, or hand, or digit -- all helps to inform the whole. IMHO.

But it's essential to be smart about it -- some injuries require rest for tissues to repair before becoming active again. Lacerations and surguries for instance.

I work closely with a physio therapist which has really helped my adustment into my own middle aged collection of injuries -- if you can work with a profesional I highly recommend it!

And injuries change your body.

David Mott gave me a piece of advice relating to an injury several years ago: he said, "Allow yourself to become something new".

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2009 6:40 pm 
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"ooouuuuuuuuch! Hope you are much better now! Did that exercise in determination cause problems or delay your recovery?"Thanks Shana
:)

Well no it didn't.it was only later that I learned of it when I saw my consultant he told me about it being dangerously unstable and told me that I needed another hip replacement.............. Then after my operation to get my second hip replacement , (the first was A Birmingham hip resurfacing which failed)....they didn't want me to leave hospital because I refused the painkillers :lol: :lol: ........I have a high pain tolerance apparantly :roll: ( although I am the biggest coward going and cry at girly films :oops: )
Now no disrespect to the medical profession , but even they are not that sure about a lot of things, so I became extremly sceptical of any Quacks or new age remedies or any "Exercise systems " that improve medical injuries :roll:

There is a a Chinese saying " Only a fool learns by his mistakes" :lol: ........so Don't be a fool !! ..learn from mine :wink:


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 12:03 pm 
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wow...definately will keep that in mind

as to high pain tolerance...I've heard that from a lot of karateka...is it high pain tolerance or sheer stubbornness (what my grandma called being full of p*** and vinegar)?

In any case, I worked through some pain in class last night (have injured my wrist) and actually felt better after class...but I have doc visit today, so we'll see how stupid I was...sigh :oops:

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 12:55 pm 
I believe that women have a higher pain tolerance than men. With me I think that I developed a high pain tolerance over the years that I had arthritis.I used to be on a constant supply of anti inflammatory drugs and painkillers.
I used to be a high kicker in karate, and although some people will say high kicks won't damage your legs or give you arthritis it's amazing how many kickers get replacement hips when they are in their 50's folks like Chuck Norris, Bill Wallace, Billy Blanks....Now I realise that maybe I should have been a bit more careful :cry: ............. So I am very sceptical about a lot of the new exercise stuff, I had a couple of kettlebells which I gave away, and now I am very,very careful about what I do and how I do it.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2009 5:25 am 
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It depends, Shana; on why you train, on what you hope to do and the stage in your life.

Some things that are very good for your mind/spirit are very, very bad for your body.

I used to train through injury all the time, for two reasons. One was that if I got injured in a real fight I couldn't stop so I couldn't afford to condition myself to stop. Unless the injury was severe enough to take time off from work there was a real possibility I would have to fight with it, so I trained that way. Good side, I know I can run on a broken fibula, continue a judo match seconds after my knee was snapped backwards and relocate my own shoulder in both a real fight and a match. Bad side, a lot of my body hurts most of the time; there's no 'good side' to sleep on, stuff like that. It's a pay off- as I enter middle age there are a lot of things that I will pay for (for the rest of my life), but they are some of the things that got me to middle age.

The second reason is what Chris said. When bad stuff happens, I have to work with the body I have, which may not be rested and stretched and warmed up and whole. So I practice with what I have, injuries and all, and learn to work with them. It's a good skill and more importantly a good habit to practice doing things the way you can do them instead of forcing yourself to mimic the way you were taught.

None of this applies if you are training for health or fun or history. As I get older and as I move into areas where an M4 is the first line, followed by an M9 and then hand weapons in preference to hand-to-hand, it has become far less of a priority.

This probably doesn't help Shana. My advice: tough it out when you need to develop a skill in toughing it out. Otherwise, train healthy and safely. Just be careful that an ache or pain doesn't become an excuse to be lazy.

Rory[/i]


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 12, 2009 12:15 am 
I've seen pain in others...............terminally ill :cry: I've had pain myself.arthritic pain ( brought on by myself :evil: )...arthritic pain is like somebody bending back your fingers till it hurts....and you get it 24/7..and it's like earache it doesn't stop or go away.;recently my wife had to deal with a guy ( she's a nurse)..he had terminal cancer.......never drank or smoked, vegetarian..............bone cancer, they dosed him up with everything but still he was in pain :cry: .pain is a whole world in itself........if you can fight through it.then it's not real pain :cry:


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2009 9:08 pm 
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RA Miller wrote:
This probably doesn't help Shana. My advice: tough it out when you need to develop a skill in toughing it out. Otherwise, train healthy and safely. Just be careful that an ache or pain doesn't become an excuse to be lazy.[/i]


Actually, this is very helpful. Especially that last to not let it be an excuse. Thank you all for your input!

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