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PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2008 8:11 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 10, 1998 6:01 am
Posts: 190
Location: Falmouth, Ma.
First of all, we are setting up a scanner. I feel that my explanations may not sink in without photos to show exactly what I am talking about. I will be using examples right out of my Explosive Karate Book. Today, I will discuss another topic.
As I watch the UFC fighters on TV, I see highly qualified fighters. Fighters who have been well trained, fighters who train very hard, but I also see fighters who miss opportunities that could end the fight. As I watch, I see much clinching, close situations where more hitting can be happening. It's these close encounters that I will be talking about. Even though these fighters are highly trained, they are missing opportunites because many of them are unaware of what to do in that close perimeter. Even though they hit with tremendous power, this power comes from much farther away than I like to see. We see elbows in close, but these elbows can be thrown even closer. This is what I will be explaining in the upcoming weeks. In grappling situations, even on the ground, powerful strikes can be delivered. You will hear me talking at great length about torquing movements. These torquing movements can be done from the ground, just as they can be done on your feet. The fighter's hand placement has everything to do with short powerful strikes. When I see fighters reaching back to deliver a full punch, rather than taking full advantage of the close position they are in, I wonder why? Many times when reaching back to deliver that full punch, they in turn, leave themselves open to be hit. Once a fighter realizes the devestation they can deliver from being very close, they won't want to do it any other way. They will also start to realize that they are not being hit as much. My way of thinking is that it's better to hit than be hit. I think everyone will agree with that. In a nut shell, many fighters do not take advantage of the hand, wrist, the forearm and proper use of the elbow. They are losing the advantage of being in close. if you do not put to use this knowledge you are missing the chance to end the fight. In the upcoming weeks, with the use of photos from my Explosive Karate Book, this will be highlighted and hopefully understood.
I wish I were 35 years younger so I could jump into the frey.
Art


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2008 5:29 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 10, 1998 6:01 am
Posts: 190
Location: Falmouth, Ma.
Until I am able to get photos on this site, I will have to wing it for a while. As I thought about what I was going to write, it came to me. Let's talk about things that take place in your workout and relate it to power infighting. Let's look at our prearranged kumites and drills. Working with a partner means you are helping each other to better understand this concept. Remember, we are not just talking about striking here. Blocking, distance, angles, foundation, hand position and striking accuracy, coordination of block and counter, all come into play. Lots of trial and error here. The best way to begin, is simply to warm up by taking a few punches. Begin by using a slight body turn as you block. The Uechi circular block is the main deflective movement here. Let's look at this very effective block differently than is used in our kata. Keeping our arms up, and in a very comfortable position, take the middle punch. Try not moving much here, just snap your hips in a quick turn with your block. Work on this until you have coordinated the hip and block to work together in one piece. Now let's look at your block. That large circular movement may be OK in kata, but not here. To get the best result the block must be snapping fast with the hips. Your blocking elbow never leaves sanchin. Your first movement is a fast arcing hand at the fist of the attack. In this way the back of your hand and wrist are making contact with the underside of the wrist of the punch. On touch you much snap your hips slightly and roll you hand with your elbow in sanchin, from 12 o'clock to 6 o'clock. Not 9 o'clock to 3 o'clock. This will fire the attacking arm into an easy countering position. Now is the time to check with your partner. How did your partner end up? Here's what should happen. Your partner should be in a forward bend position. That snapping 12 to 6 movement with the hip tourque, will fire that attacking arm downward. To get this to work it must be practiced many many times. I must warn you, you might eat a few punches at first. When you get it down, it will be pretty much impossible to be hit. OK, we've got that tight crisp 12 to 6 block down pretty good, now what?

Now comes the good stuff. The counter is very quick and will hit very hard. There are many strikes that can occur once that attacking arm is blocked as I've drawn out. This is when you can take what is given you. Never search for something-just take what's there. Keeping your hands close together while you block will enable you to do some good things. When you fire into the block, always take both hands with you. This will add to the quickness and power of the movement. It will also leave you in a great countering position. You will notice the situation once you snap that block from 12 to 6. Take a look at where your blocking hand is and the path back up your partner's attacking arm. Like a path to the open neck and head. He's not blocking this counter. Very slowing at first, just let your blocking hand slid up that attacking arm. See what's at the end of the road,,,the head. I find the fastest counter is the radial strike. That's the thumb side of your hand. Let it fire right up that arm into the neck or jaw of the attacker. Also, keep your arm in that bent arced position when firing this counter. Never straighten your arm in this movement. NEVER. Be aware of what's going on with your partner when all of this is happening. Watch the position your partner is in. You will notice that everything opens up for that exploding counter. I've written quite a lot here, for something that takes a blink from start to finish. Practice, practice practice..You will find yourself blocking like this in your pre-arranged kumites. This is just tapping the surface of infighting and power hitting. When I can get some photos, it will make things clearer. In the meantime, play with this and see if you have any success. Remember-everything happens in one piece. From the start of your block to the crashing counter, is just a blink. The more you coordinate your movements, the faster and harder you hit. Have Fun, go play, see ya next week.
Art


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 Post subject: Blocking mind set
PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2008 6:03 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 10, 1998 6:01 am
Posts: 190
Location: Falmouth, Ma.
Art just left, after posting that last lesson. While reading it over, I thought of something that might help some of you when Art talks about "blocking." From the begining, I was taught that there was nothing defensive about a block. One should consider any block as offensive and to deliver it the same as a stike followed by a strike. The blocks are delivered with the same explosive power. With good conditioning and the explosiveness coming right out of sanchin, the blocks do dynamite damage, be it to the arms or legs. The mindset here is,,,if one throws a kick, block it in a way that they can't use that leg for another kick, or, if they can, they won't want to. Perhaps you may have a problem "seeing" what Art is saying. I think it may help if you begin thinking the same way he thinks. (impossible??) could be. :lol: Just always think offense.
Just remember that when Art talks about a block, putting that block into motion, to him is the same as coming with a strike. Both will explode with that same power. Believe me, it works and if there are any doubts, well, maybe someday you will have the opportunity to see it in action. Art is always glad to demonstrate. BUT, don't be too anxious to volunteer.
As Art says,,,,have fun!!
Bill B.


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