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 Post subject: Infighting leg thrust
PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2008 4:16 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 10, 1998 6:01 am
Posts: 190
Location: Falmouth, Ma.
MY FRIEND TIBIA:
Have you met my good friend tibia lately? You really should get better acquainted. Tibia can add a new dimension to your power training. You'll recognize my friend right away if it's introduced to your leg. Wouldn't you rather have tibia as your friend than an enemy? Sure you would. The tibia bone is better known by all as the shin. We all have one and we would just as soon not bang it on anything hard. We see the shin padded on many karate free fighters in tournaments. We see it protected in the sport of soccer or field hockey. Any time there might be a remote chance of this tibia bone being struck, it usually is protected somehow. Maybe you've done it yourself from time to time. It is a very polite and respectful fighter who pads this powerful weapon so there will be no injury to his opponent. f.
Wouldn't it be easier to think of your shin as one of your biggest weapons rather than hide it? When used correctly, the tibia is the big bone as in bomb. It can block kicks that the arms have trouble with. It can assist you as you move in on the target. The biggest and greatest thing that my friend can do is explode into the arms and legs of that attacker. It's very possible to hurt the shin when the kick is not thrown with proper mechanics. When done with the proper angle and arc, the shin explodes with a sort of slicing look to it. The old faithful front kick will take on a whole new meaning and respect. When the shin is turned on its side slightly, the front kick becomes the crescent kick. Lets take a look at what I mean.


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PHOTOS #31, #31A, 31B. 31C:
The leg strikes that are the hardest to detect and block, and are real stopping blows, are the low powerful ones. If you want something that will really get that bad guys attention, listen carefully to this.
Photos #31 to 31C gives a look at the good old front kick. Actually, I've given you two looks. Bill is demonstrating the front kick that we all know and recognize. You know that this kick should have the knee raised before the thrust takes place. That must be the way to do it because everybody does it that way. It seems to hit pretty hard that way doesn't it?
Yup, it sure can. Why is it that you and many others kind of shy away from firing this front kick into the body during dojo practice? Because of it getting blocked and injuring your toes, foot, or shin. Right? I know because I danced to that tune plenty of times over these many years.
I'm doing the" fighting," or "power front kick." Looks a little different in the delivery process doesn't it? At the beginning (#31), the difference is evident. Bill's kicking leg is beginning the upward movement while my foot is beginning a forward movement.
Both kicks are seeking that elevated knee position by different routes. In
#31A it is starting to take shape. One foot is still going up while the other is still going forward. Finally, the raised knee position is reached for both kicks. (#31B), But look where the striking foot is on each kick. One is just inches from impact while the other is still in the starting gate. Interesting HUH? In #31C, the finish of this kick is shone. This is into the impact zone while the other kick is still getting there.


PHOTOS #32 to 32C:
This arcing formula can be applied to the side kick as well. The kicking leg will thrust forward with the same arc as the front kick (#32 ). The low back muscles will coordinate with the snapping torque of the trunk into the impact area. The supporting leg must pivot slightly in coordination with the powerful torquing of the large muscle groups above it (#32A.) This type of side kick is designed to hit low because of the way it is delivered. Notice the hard reverse torque of the upper body in #32A. The hands stay in the same power position throughout the entire delivery and into impact. To get this side kick higher, you're going to have to get that knee higher (#32B). This can also hit pretty hard, but it certainly gives the target a longer and much better look at it. The kicks in photos #32A and #32C is very difficult to detect and is faster to the impact area. I've got this side kick (#32A ) just above the belt, but it can get to the hip or thigh even faster.


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Next week, more infighting leg thrusts plus more practice drills. Have a good week.
Art


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