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PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2005 7:41 pm 
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At the same time, the stances, footwork and weighting are different when we compare the Jook Lum to the Chu Gar. Many times it has been said that Fujian Bai He Quan (Fujian White Crane Boxing) and Wu Zu Quan are the origin of the Japanese Karate. It is true that Wu Zu Quan style has exactly the same Sanchin form that the Uechi Ryu and Goju Karate styles (with some differences in the tension, and the Chinese version includes two-man version). But Uechi Ryu has a form called Som Bo Gin (Three Arrow Fist), the most famous southern praying mantis form, and both form have similar movements and also the Uechi Ryu foot movements mimic those of Southern Mantis. In addition most Okinawan and Japanese forms follow the same numerology, such as, San Chin Kata (3 steps), Seipa Kata (18), Sanseiru kata (36) and Pechurin Kata (108). Maybe these similarities between Karate and Southern Mantis are due to the common origin in the Fujian temple, but maybe it was Southern Praying Mantis, and not Wu Zu Quan the style that originated the Okinawan Karate...


A long read but lots of key concepts are discussed that drive what I call the Chinese Super Styles. The concepts and tools, addressed to some extent in this paper, are so powerful that they are what drive the last and most advanced systems to roll off the Shaolin assembly line intended to drive off the Manchu.

It is these super styles IMO that gave rise and inspired the creation of Okinowan Karate. Understanding these concepts and how to apply them is IMO critical to understanding what was the heart of these systems and why these methods were so sought after by the old founders, like Kanbun.

http://cclib.nsu.ru/projects/satbi/satb ... hu/sm.html

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"Receive what comes, stay with what goes, upon loss of contact attack the line" – The Kuen Kuit


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2005 10:09 pm 
Sweet ....

good stuff Jim .

there can be no doubt that the chinese systems influenced karate , there is a lot of historical proof to support it .

Quote:
It is true that Wu Zu Quan style has exactly the same Sanchin form that the Uechi Ryu and Goju Karate styles (with some differences in the tension, and the Chinese version includes two-man version).


anybody have any information on two man set ?


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2005 11:18 pm 
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Interesting they also emphasize the intercept... Along with many other similarities with WCK and other Southern Styles..

More from the paper:

Quote:
FIGHTING THEORY

There are many other principles such as the centerline theory; intercepting hand and sticky hand; rooting, moving the center, attaching the center; crossing the bridge; straight power and borrowing force; float, sink, swallow and spit; which I may address in the future. Several strategies may be employed when fighting: scaring, faking actions, tripping the opponent attacking from the left and right angles as well as from the front, adhering and discharging. Sight and sound are also refined in order to understand and anticipate the opponent's movement. Hand-to-hand contact is used to "sense" the opponent strength, weaknesses, power, intentions, shifting of weight, and readiness to attack. The idea is to get your opponent off balance and not let him regain it; and at the same time shift in close with explosive rapid fire strikes. The opponent must try to ward off these blows, but so fast and many this is very difficult to do. Speed is essential. The principle of intent or "will-power" is first discussed. Intent may simply be defined as the "warrior spirit." Without it, their is no focus of the body and mind into one purpose.

If pushed downward the hand turns to strike upward, if pushed upward the hand turns to strike downward, if pushed inward the hand turns to strike outward, if pushed out the hand turns (changes) to strike inward (simply said). Of course, this is a principle and as one becomes skillful, his hand learns to adapt to any angle or circumstance.

This principle of contact, control and strike is central to all mantis action is based on the three powers of the arm; from the shoulder to the elbow, elbow to the wrist, wrist to the fingertips. A skillful mantis will defend and attack using one arm (leaving one hand free) to trap and control the opponents two arms. This is done with one arm by using the forearm for defensive movement while simultaneously attacking with the hand or fingers. This can only be accomplished if one has understood the centerline theory.

And so, a superior art is based on a deep rooted stance, upright footwork in stepping and production of power by the movement of the ribs and diaphragm. It will use the conditioned arms and hands 70% of the time and the legs and feet 30% of the time in offense and defense. This is because, in this style the hands are considered the quickest and most convenient weapon.
Songs
As many other traditional styles the Southern Praying Mantis has "songs" to help the student to remember the style's fighting theories. This is the Praying Mantis Fist Upper Body and Foot Work song:

Upper Body
Raise hands above, point palms down.
Grab, catch, punch and seize.
Move one hand above the head and level the other one.
Bend your knees like a frog's. Round your back like a basket.
Foot Work
Shape your feet like a "T" but not a "T", "V" not like a "V".
Stretch your hands out from the heart.
If you don't attack, I won't attack.

Another song in the styles says:

" The hanging power is like a noose that opens and contracts.
The hands that seize holds and catch
The head is down, eyes look sharp like that of a cat.
The ribs open and close like the hinge of a door.
The legs are bent like a frog ready to spring.
When you achieve something in Tong Long Kune, then you are about to
begin."

There is another song in the style that says "On tum chum bil loi lau hei sung" One should immediately block and attack from any gate. Welcome in the guest and when we get tired of him we kick him out The meaning of this song is take in opponent's power, neutralize it, and return it to him many fold.

Another song "Hand to hand, heart to heart; you don't come, I won't start" is used to explain the theory in the two man sensitivity drills.
Centerline

By pressing the centerline of the opponent, sticking to his movement and feeling his intent, the skillful hand can, using small, quick, short, angular jerks and deflections, redirect and create an opening in the opponents center and intent while delivering a single devastating blow in a straight line (the shortest quickest distance between two points) to his vital spots. Continuous direct blows are given until the opponents submission. The mantis philosophy is train until within three blows the opponent submits, bleeds or ceases to exist.
Distances

Southern Praying Mantis has 3 distances to cover: long, to cover the distance; medium, where to enter; and close where punishing blows can be delivered. The techniques of the Southern Mantis system are short range, based on inch force power that comes from tendon contraction.

The first task of infighting is to get in close to the opponent. This would seem especially important to a style like southern mantis: since the mantis stylist's forte is infighting. It stands to reason he would be particularly vulnerable at the longer distance most other styles use. Actually, this is no problem. When one is used to fending blows that come from very near, a round kick or long arm punch seems slow by comparison.

If the opponent was the type who flicked kicks from as far away as possible, the mantis practitioner would simply attack the kicking leg by catching the kick and jamming the knee, or by actually striking the kicking leg (the side of the knee would be a good target), or by kicking the muscles of the thigh. All of these would prove very discouraging to a would-be attacker.

In most combat situations, the long-range fighter would try to drive in against a mantis stylist, opening with kicks to close the distance and then finishing with hand techniques. In such a case, the mantis stylist would simply sidestep the attack and allow his opponent's own movement to bring him into range. Often, accompanying this evasion tactic with a quick snap kick to the attacker's groin. As the assailant moves into range to apply his hand techniques, he would rind the mantis practitioner's hands reaching out for his arm and controlling him in his attempts at continuing the attack.

Once the mantis stylist has come into range, or more accurately, once the attacker has moved himself into the mantis practitioner's range-how is it possible for him to defend against getting hit?
Levels

As there are three distances, there are also 3 levels of height involved; floor fighting, where the Southern Praying Mantis practitioner is fighting from the floor; medium, where attacks are aimed low and the body is slightly dropped, and high, where Mantis techniques are applied to the face and shoulder line. if anybody has seen my school training they would notice that the punches never come from or start at the hip, but in front of the chest, this is where short 'inch force' movements can be applied to their fullest extent.
Feeling

Even a beginning student can execute a punch in one fourth of a second, this means that within arm's reach it is very difficult to block a punch. The Southern mantis solution to this problem begins with the fighting posture taken. In imitation of the praying mantis. The practitioner holds his arms out toward his opponent. When possible, he seeks to have his arms in actual contact with his assailant's. In this way he can feel the attack from its earliest moment. This method saves precious time in two ways. First, he is able to react immediately to the stimulus of an aggressive action without having to wait for his brain to process the information through his eyes. Second, no time is lost bringing his arm from an on-guard position into place to block. In addition to the time-saving aspect of his fighting posture, the ability to catch an attack early in its movement makes it possible to control the blow with not too much effort.

The most important element in the mantis style integration of defense and offense does not he in tactics and techniques, but rather, in the development of "feeling." Feeling is the quality of being sensitive to an opponent's movements and being able to blend with them in a perfect response. Feeling is so central to the mantis style-and to infighting in general-that everything written so far presupposes its development One of the biggest drawbacks of close-quarters combat is that there is virtually no time in which to respond to an action. To further compound this, many attacks are virtually invisible. It becomes imperative that the responses a fighter makes are not dependent on his mind's analysis of a situation or his eyes' perceptions. By developing feeling one gains an almost "sixth" sense, a sensitivity through the arms to the movements of an opponent. Since the stimulus is perceived-through direct tactile contact. it is possible to respond faster. The response also tends to be mom appropriate, since the mind often overreacts to visual stimuli. If the mantis stylist's responses are more appropriate, due to his development of feeling, then they are also more efficient. This is an obvious advantage if one is called upon to fight for a prolonged period of time. Efficient techniques also mean better control over an opponent. By not over-reacting to an attack, the mantis stylist remains in balance and capable of giving that extra little push that can turn a simple block into a move that unbalances or exposes an assailant Another important benefit of the development of feeling is the ability to use an opponent's power against him. If an attacker punches the mantis stylist, he will grab the punching arm and pull it. This simple act has the effect of wrenching the attacker's shoulder destroying his balance, and possibly pulling him into a counter technique like a knee strike. However. if you have ever tried to grab a punch you know that it is not really easy to do. That is why feeling is so important. By sensing the attack initially, the mantis stylist is able to make contact with the punching arm early in the movement. In this way. the grabbing hand is moving with the punch and has plenty of time to grab hold- as opposed to trying to snatch the arm as it goes by. Well-developed feeling for the opponent's movements also determines which counter move will be used. If the attacker is pulled well off balance, then he can be drawn into a sharp counterattack. But, if the attacker's lead leg is well forward so that his center of gravity stays behind that foot, then a palm-heel strike to his fully locked elbow, or a single-knuckle punch to the armpit area would be more appropriate.

Southern Praying mantis fights from an upright position, never too low to impair response and speed. Using the feeling hands of the mantis the boxer closes the gap, crosses the bridge, feels his enemies power, yields, then with the weight of the whole body and the explosive power of internal energy concentrated into one small area destroys the enemy within one exchange that doesn't stop until blood is drawn.
Infighting

At very close quarters, targets below the waist are among the most vulnerable. There are two important advantages to fighting at very close quarters. The first is that attacks can be delivered so quickly that they are almost impossible for the uninitiated to stop. The second is that, at close range, it becomes possible to strike at vital areas very precisely.
Defense & Offense

One of the most important elements of good infighting is how well defense and offense are integrated. An analysis of this integration begins with an examination of the purpose of defensive moves. The first goal of defense, obviously, is to keep from being hit. When blocking is approached from this vantage it becomes necessary to discover the openings in the assailant to exploit for a successful counter. The opening can be thought of as rhythmic. As a person attacks they have a punch-and-punch-and-punch-and pattern. There is a gap, or space of time, between each blow. In order to exploit this pattern. the defender must break this rhythm with his counterattack. The defender's pattern would go block-and is block-counter. thereby catching his opponent between punches. If an opponent attacked with a front kick-punch combination, the mantis fighter would employ this rhythm breaking pattern of defense. After parrying the kick with his leg, and while the attacker was recovering from the kick and preparing to punch, the well trained mantis stylist would counter with a side snap kick to the ribs. Obviously, the success of such an approach depends upon the speed at which the counterattack follows the block. (This is why the rapid-fire, multiple-power strike is so effective-it does not allow opportunity for a counterattacks. In order to cut down the interval between the block and counter, mantis practitioners frequently block and counter with the same arm (or leg) in one continuous motion. Another good way to utilize this rhythm braking idea is to block with one hand while simultaneously countering with the other.
Usage of the attacker energy

Though it is easy to see how an aggressive attack can be used against the attacker, the mantis practitioner can also turn the attacker's defense against him. If the mantis stylist attacked with a punch and his opponent blocked it forcefully with an inward block, he would simply allow the force of the block to spin his arm around like a propeller. His hand would circle with his elbow as the axis and come crashing in from the other side. A punch blocked to the side would return as a knife-hand blow to the neck. One blocked downward would come crashing down as a back-fist strike. If the defender blocks more softly-so there isn't enough force to spin the mantis' arm in a large circle-he will use what force there is to "flip" his fist around the block. This is an action done more with the wrist than the elbow. allowing the mantis practitioner to press the attack with the same hand by striking again. over the block.
Circles

Whole circles, half-circles, quarter circles, circling in and circling out, circling high and circling low. In the southern praying mantis system circles are everything and everywhere. Circles are used to walk the horse, position the body, generate power, block, strike, perform the chi kung, and move from gate to gate. Working alongside the system of circles is the yat yee som (1-2-3). As higher levels are achieved, the numbers increase, much based on the number three. The foundation, however, rests in the chin som, or the first three soft positions, and the how som, the second or power positions.
Yin/yang theory

The yin/yang theory (Mandarin) is known in Cantonese as yum/yan. To throw a punch you must be relaxed (Yin) to make your punch speedy. Just as you are about to strike your opponent, you suddenly exert a lot of force and become Yang. If the opponent blocks your punch, instead of trying to exert more force (Yang versus Yang) to get by his parry, you become soft (Yin) and spin around his block in the direction of the exerted force, striking him and becoming Yang on contact.

A Praying Mantis practitioner develops short power, the ability to exert tremendous force from a short distance. Therefore, a punch need not be finalized until the instant before striking and you can also attack again without withdrawing the attacking arm.

Blocking, kicking, grappling and using weapons also turn the opponent's power against him, just like a wall reflects a thrown ball. Combat then becomes time varying mixture of Yin and Yang.

Yin and Yang energies circulate in the ventral and dorsal parts of the body, respectively, determining their nature. the toughest parts of the body, which are more resistant to blows, are the dorsal and exterior surfaces of the arms and legs and also the back. The inside surfaces of the arms, legs and body are more sensitive. In these parts the skin is softer and more easily bruised.


_________________
Shaolin
M Y V T K F
"Receive what comes, stay with what goes, upon loss of contact attack the line" – The Kuen Kuit


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2005 11:25 pm 
thanks so much Jim , i`m still going through it , exceptional stuff !!!


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2005 11:32 pm 
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JimHawkins wrote:
Quote:
But Uechi Ryu has a form called Som Bo Gin (Three Arrow Fist), the most famous southern praying mantis form



We have a kata called Som Bo Gin?


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2005 4:06 am 
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I have the text fort he two man form but can't find the electronic file. It used to be posted up on the bamboo temple site...that site is all over the place these days so I don't know if you'd be able to still find it there.

Dana

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2005 5:18 am 
Thanks Dana , i`ll try hunt it down :)


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2005 8:52 am 
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If an attacker punches the mantis stylist, he will grab the punching arm and pull it. This simple act has the effect of wrenching the attacker's shoulder destroying his balance, and possibly pulling him into a counter technique like a knee strike. However. if you have ever tried to grab a punch you know that it is not really easy to do. That is why feeling is so important. By sensing the attack initially, the mantis stylist is able to make contact with the punching arm early in the movement. In this way. the grabbing hand is moving with the punch and has plenty of time to grab hold- as opposed to trying to snatch the arm as it goes by. Well-developed feeling for the opponent's movements also determines which counter move will be used. If the attacker is pulled well off balance, then he can be drawn into a sharp counterattack. But, if the attacker's lead leg is well forward so that his center of gravity stays behind that foot, then a palm-heel strike to his fully locked elbow, or a single-knuckle punch to the armpit area would be more appropriate.


I like this part. :lol:

Jim, just having a good time with friends. I can't resist a running joke. :wink:


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2005 6:33 am 
Agree great stuff.


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 Post subject: Sam bo gin 2 man set
PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2005 3:44 pm 
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Found an old email...good luck. The terms are all SPM for various moves. It would take a good while and pictures to explain the movements. I'm not familiar with the technique names in the set. But since I found it I wanted to post it for reference. I do remember that "mor sao" is basically the hooking mantis arm that goes to the inside or the outside - basically a mini wauke.

cheers,
Dana

Quote:
Som Bo Gin means "three steps forward" or sometimes called "three step arrow." The single man practice of Som Bo Gin is used to develop stance, stepping, segmented striking power, turning power, trapping and footwork and the principles of "float, sink, swallow and spit." It also includes breath control method and muscle-tendon changing exercise. After practicing the single man form of Som Bo Gin and the Lah Sao, "Loose Hands," two man form, one begins the practice of the two man Som Bo Gin Breakdown.

The two man breakdown of Som Bo Gin is the second prearranged fighting set of Southern Praying Mantis. Som Bo Gin Breakdown builds on the foundation of the Loose Hands form. Adding to the list of hand techniques found in the Loose Hands formula, Som Bo Gin Breakdown includes hand techniques of turning power with gao choy and using gop shu, bot hop shu, jik shu, ping shu and trapping techniqes. Adding to the list of foot techniques found in the Loose Hands formula, Som Bo Gin Breakdown 180 degree turn (step behind), monkey stepping and kicking.

In the Loose Hands form, one should be familiar with quick footwork
stepping and relaxed strength "feeling" hand. Som Bo Gin should be
practiced with the intent to develop more "float, sink, swallow and spit"
power and keeping constant contact while controlling and turning power. The first section of the form specifically focuses on controlling and striking
within three steps. Each action should create the next action. The form should be practiced making fluid changes and not rigid, "choppy," motions. As in the Loose Hands form, think of using "relaxed strength"- not too little that you lose contact and feeling, but not so much that your motion in broken and not continuous. Remember that the skill being developed is that of using the other persons strength, tension and resistance against him. The first gao choy in the Som Bo Gin Breakdown uses the power of the other persons defense to turn and strike. When one can relax and turn easily, it is like letting the other person hit themself with your hand! Maintain a firm stance in the feet and legs ("like Mt. Tai"), keep the elbows in front of the body and let the elbows and wrists turn smoothly and relaxed. Concentrate on the idea and practice of relaxing and using the other persons force.

Like the Loose Hands form, Som Bo Gin is learned and practiced based on
using 10% intent and power in the beginning. Once the form is familiar, the intent may be increased from 10% to 20% and then 30-50-70 and 90%. 100% power and intent should be equated with using lethal force and reserved for self-defense. When using 70-90%, practicers should be careful striking to the eyes, throat and other soft targets. "Dit da jow" or some type of bruise medicine should be used on bruises after practice.
Som Bo Gin Breakdown is the second in a series of two man formulas. It
should be learned after practicing the Loose Hands two man form and the Som Bo Gin single man form. Knowing the form is not equal to making it
skillful. Regular, cooperative practice with a partner is necessary. Even
after partners increase intent and power in practice, it is still useful and
necessary to practice 10% power and intent to develop relaxed, listening
power. Remember that by not using brute force, but instead using relaxed
strength (jing), a smaller person may overcome a stronger one.

Like the Loose Hands form, Som Bo Gin Breakdown is taught with an "A" side and a "B" side. The "A" side initiates a bridge and is sometimes called the Offensive side. The "B" side intercepts the "A" side's attack and is called the Defensive side. However, both sides attack and defend throughout the form.

One standard (formal) starting position is heels together, feet pointing 45
degrees out from center, and hands "chambered" against the chest.

A- advance step with the right foot and right hand strike (jet shu) to B's
solar plexus.

B- step back with the left foot to a right horse (right leg forward) and lef
t hand mor sao A's strike.

A- advance step with left foot and left hand strike (jet shu) to B's solar
plexus.

B- step back with the right foot and right hand mor sao A's strike.

A- advance step with the right foot and right hand strike (jet shu) to B's
solar plexus. When B defends with a left mor sao, keep the elbow forward
and contact with your forearm. Use the force of B's mor sao to rotate your
arm at the elbow bringing your fist in a complete circle under your chin and
around to B's left temple (turning power). Use your forearm to keep contact
and control B's left arm.

B- step back with the left foot and left hand mor sao A's strike. The A
side will use the power of your mor sao and turn to gao choy. (It is useful
in practice to give the A side sufficient force to develop relaxed turning
power using your force. However, be careful because when your partner gets
this skill he uses your force to hit you! Help your partner learn so he can
help you learn.) When A turns to gao choy, your left hand now changes to
foun shu and hooks back to defend against the gao choy. Both sides should
practice to maintain contact (to control) throughout these motions.

A- use right hand gwak shu to turn to the inside of B's foun shu defense.
Strike back to B's chest with your palm (bao gong).

B- follow A's motion and turn your left hand to mor sao (use the inside of
your forearm) on top of A's attack. Next, advance step your left foot
forward and right hand strike (jet shu) to A's solar plexus.

A- step back with the right foot (left foot will be in front) and left hand
mor sao B's strike.

B- advance step right foot and left hand strike (jet shu) to A's solar
plexus.

A- step back with the left foot (right foot will be in front) and right hand
mor sao B's strike.

B- advance step left foot and right hand strike (jet shu) to A's solar
plexus. When A defends with a left mor sao, keep the elbow forward and
contact with your forearm. Use the force of A's mor sao to rotate your arm
at the elbow bringing your fist in a complete circle under your chin and
around to A's left temple (turning power). Use your forearm to keep contact
and control A's left arm.

A- step back with the right foot and left hand mor sao B's strike. The B
side will use the power of your mor sao and turn to gao choy. When B turns
to gao choy, your left hand now changes to foun shu and hooks back to defend
against the gao choy. Both sides should practice to maintain contact (to
control) throughout these motions.

B- use right hand gwak shu to turn to the inside of A's foun shu defense.
Strike back to A's chest with your palm (bao gong).

A- follow B's motion and turn your left hand to mor sao (use the inside of
your forearm) on top of B's attack. Next, advance step your right foot
forward and right hand strike (jet shu) to B's solar plexus.

B- step back with the left foot and left hand mor sao A's strike.

A- advance step left foot and left hand strike (jet shu) to B's solar
plexus.

B- step back with the right foot and right hand mor sao A's strike.

A- advance step right foot and right hand strike (jet shu) to B's solar
plexus.

B- step back with the left foot and left hand mor sao A's strike. Use the
mor sao hook to bring A's right arm across the centerline and slightly down
while at the same time rotate at the elbow so that your fist makes a
vertical circle back toward your chest and continues around to strike (gao
choy) the bridge of A's nose. The technique is to use the mor sao to trap
A's hands and use turning power to strike with gao choy.

A- follow the direction of B's mor sao and circle both of your hands
clockwise to contact B's attack. Your right hand should contact/control B's
right wrist and your left hand should contact/control B's right elbow.
Continue to make a full circle (similar to your right hand is outside mor
sao and the left continues to circle inside B's right arm like gwak shu) so
that at you are inside of B's arms. Use your forearm to control B's arms
and strike with the fingers (chop shu) to B's neck.

B- follow the direction of A's circle so that you are outside of A's arms.
When A stikes with chop shu, close your forearms (elbows together and wrists
together, gop shu) and pull down and a little to the right/ off your
centerline. Strike back simultaneously (double strike) right hand (jet shu)
to A's left shoulder joint and left hand (jet shu) to A's right shoulder
joint.

A- simultaneously left hand foun shu B's right strike and right hand foun
shu B's left strike. Strike back simultaneously (double strike) right hand
(jet shu) to A's left shoulder joint and left hand (jet shu) to A's right
shoulder joint.

B- simultaneously use your left hand to mor sao A's right hand on top of
A's left and your right hand to mor sao A's left hand under A's right, thus
crossing and trapping A's arms. Use your left hand to press A's right arm
into his left arm as you pull your right fist back to your chest. Holding A
with your left hand mor sao, advance step with left foot and strike (jet
shu) with the right hand to A's chin (or nose).

A- step back with the right foot (left foot is now in front) and left hand
mor sao B's strike. Timing and distancing are important to free the left
hand from B's trap if B is able to trap skillfully.

B- advance step with right foot and left hand strike (jet shu) to A's
solar plexus.

A- step back with the left foot and right hand mor sao B's strike.

B- advance step with the left foor and right hand strike (jet shu) to A's
solar plexus.

A- step back with the left foot and left hand mor sao B's strike. Use the
mor sao hook to bring A's right arm across the centerline and slightly down
while at the same time rotate at the elbow so that your fist makes a
vertical circle back toward your chest and continues around to strike (gao
choy) the bridge of B's nose. The technique is to use the mor sao to trap
B's hands and use turning power to strike with gao choy.

B- follow the direction of A's mor sao and circle both of your hands
clockwise to contact A's attack. Your right hand should contact/control A's
right wrist and your left hand should contact/control A's right elbow. Make
a full circle (similar to your right hand is mor sao and the left continues
ins0ide like gwak shu) so that at you are inside of A's arms. Use your
forearm to control A's arms and strike with the fingers (chop shu) to A's
neck.

A- follow the direction of B's circle so that you are outside of B's arms.
When B stikes with chop shu, close your forearms (elbows together and wrists
together, gop shu) and pull down and a little to the right/ off your
centerline. Strike back simultaneously (double strike) right hand (jet shu)
to B's left shoulder joint and left hand (jet shu) to B's right shoulder
joint.

B- simultaneously left hand foun shu A's right strike and right hand foun
shu A's left strike. Strike back simultaneously (double strike) right hand
(jet shu) to A's left shoulder joint and left hand (jet shu) to A's right
shoulder joint.

A- simultaneously use left hand to inside mor sao B's right strike and your
right hand to inside mor sao B's left strike (right mor sao is under the
left mor sao to trap B with his right hand over the left). Control B with
your left hand and circle the right hand back to your chest and continue to
strike (gao choy) to the bridge of B's nose.

B- your right hand is controlled by A's left. Turn the palm of your right
hand up and circle your left arm left (clockwise like inside mor sao) to
intercept A's right strike (gao choy). Intercept A's gao choy and deflect
off the centerline directing it on top of A's left hand. Your left hand (on
top) and right hand (on bottom) should now resemble a "clam" closing to trap
A's right hand on top of A's left. Pull A to your left and back (swallow)
and double strike (spit) bil jee, your right hand to the dan tien (1.5
inches below to navel) and the left hand to hollow of the neck ("Heaven
rushing out").

A- keep contact as B strikes. Use your right hand to choc/foun shu B's
left strike and your left to gwak shu B's right strike. Your right hand now
drops to bil jee B's dan tien (1.5 inches below the navel) and your left
hand strikes bil jee to the hollow of the neck ("Heaven rushing out").

B- as A strikes, sink your elbows to the center to use the forearms to jam
A's attack and at the same time strike bao gong with the right hand over A's
heart.

A- swallow A's strike (bao gong), controlling with your forearms and
ping/fic shu (flick the fingertips) to B's eyes and inside B's right bicep.
Twist the forearms to produce spiralling power to open B's arms and "float"
him up from his centered position.

B- keep contact as A ping shu's and keep your elbows in to control the
strike. Turn under (your right to B's left and your left to B's right)
keeping contact and grab (lop shu) A's elbows and pull up and to your right.
Double strike left hand bil jee under A's right arm and right hand strike
bil jee under A's left arm.

A- keep contact as B turns under to grab your elbows and lift up. Circle
your left hand counter-clockwise, under and inside of B's right hand and
strike jik shu (spit and float) to B's right eye. At the same time, drop
your right arm to grab (lop shu) B's left wrist and pull (sink and swallow).

B- right hand inside mor sao A's left hand strike (jik shu), sidestep to
your right and turn 90 degrees. Pull your left hand back so that your right
mor sao now crosses A's left hand over his right. Circle your left hand
(outside mor sao) to break A's lop shu and at the same time outside mor sao
A's left hand (pass off from your right hand inside mor sao to the left hand
outside mor sao). Right hand strike (jet shu) to A's left temple.

A- keep contact with your left hand to B's left hand outside mor sao as
step. Turn 180 degrees counter-clockwise (to your left) so that you now
face 90 degrees to B's front and right hand strike (jet shu) to B's eleventh
rib.

B- keep contact with your left hand to A's left hand outside mor sao and
shift 90 degrees to your left (left horse) to face A. Use your right hand
(pak shu) to defend A's low right hand strike. Left hand outside mor sao
A's left hand over his right. Control A with you left hand, advance step
your right foot forward and at the same time right strike (bao gong) to A's
heart.

A- when B outside mor sao with his left hand, circle your left hand
clockwise (to your left), sidestep 45 degrees (3 point/cat stance) to your
left as B steps forward to strike and left hand inside mor sao B's right
hand strike (bao gong). Right hand strike (jet shu) to B's right eleventh
rib.

B- half step with the left foot and turn 45 degrees to face A. At the same
time, right hand gwak shu to A's right hand strike and you left hand strike
(gao choy) to A's right temple and right leg kick to the middle of A's shin.

A- monkey step (duck the gao choy) with your weight still on the left leg.
Monkey kick (when B kicks your right leg, circle clockwise to your left
behind the kick) to the middle of B's calf. Quickly, step down with the
right leg behind B and pivot 180 degrees behind B and double strike (bao
gong) to B's kidneys.

B- set your right foot down and turn 180 degrees to face A. Use your right
hand to gwak shu the bao gong and strike gao choy to A's right temple.

A- turn your left hand to gwak shu and control inside B's right hand gwak
shu and foun/choc shu B's left hand gao choy.

B- double gwak shu to the inside of A's arms.

A- open, double choc shu to the inside of B's arms.

B- turn to double foun/choc shu to the inside of A's arms and now B becomes
the A side to attack and A becomes the B side to defend.

The end of 1/2.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2005 5:33 am 
Thanks Dana.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2005 6:38 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2002 6:01 am
Posts: 2713
Quote:
B- step back with the left foot and left hand mor sao A's strike. Use the
mor sao hook to bring A's right arm across the centerline and slightly down
while at the same time rotate at the elbow so that your fist makes a
vertical circle back toward your chest and continues around to strike (gao
choy) the bridge of A's nose. The technique is to use the mor sao to trap
A's hands and use turning power to strike with gao choy.


Elbow backfist combo anyone? :D

But instead of "hit hit" (hit with the elbow then hit with the backfist) the sweeping movement of the arm into the elbow strike position is used to redirect their strike and then they collide with your now presented backfist.

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