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PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2006 4:22 am 
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Location: Around the World
As August comes to a close, here are the new questions for September.....

1. Where do you go for more information on saving your life?
2. At what point does a professional in martial arts stops learning?
3. How often do you change your program when you are instructing?
4. What scale or evaluation process are you measuring your students?
5. What other training or programs do you offer in your dojo, and if none WHY?

Pick one and provide your comments and opinions on...

Thanks

Dave


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2006 6:12 am 
Quote:
1. Where do you go for more information on saving your life?


Internet , books , articles , News sources , First aid courses , Instructors , Instructional video/dvd , training seminars etc etc

Quote:
2. At what point does a professional in martial arts stops learning?


your not proffessional if you cease to learn (this is with everything)



Quote:
3. How often do you change your program when you are instructing?


It is impossible to do the same thing twice , I change things constantly , I beleive training is by definition an evolution .

Quote:
4. What scale or evaluation process are you measuring your students?


I test the material , and teach the few I do, to do the same , there not tested directly by anything but wether they can make it work/prevail . Because the material evolves the test is ongoing .

they are all involved in other areas of martial arts , they get to test there and return if they find things of merit to explore .





Quote:
5. What other training or programs do you offer in your dojo, and if none WHY?


I promote other peoples material and seminars and encourage training with specialists , My material is more general but mostly focused on unarmed fighting in all ranges , and some knife and stick and how it relates to my approach . I use drills from other people I have accumulated along the way , but dont teach specific programs .


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2006 10:12 am 
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Dave Young wrote:
As August comes to a close, here are the new questions for September.....

1. Where do you go for more information on saving your life?

>Guess it depends on one's age: (18-40) I was obsessed with learning new "physical" methods from whatever source available. (I now wonder if the very limited amount of material was a blessing or a drawback in my training - Just think what confusion and conflicting amount of material exists today that the modern 18-40 year old must deal with today.)

2. At what point does a professional in martial arts stops learning?

>The moment a person believes s/he is too old to learn. (an interesting topic for discussion) When a person focuses exclusively on teaching with no time devoted to learning.

3. How often do you change your program when you are instructing?

>The program doesn't change, but the method of teaching it changes every class. In this way I can add elements of new concepts and methods to my basic Uechi program. For instance... the kata are the same, but the method of teaching them vary according to the student... In this way, the program remains interesting and with a bit of imagination, I can use the kata to teach new material.

4. What scale or evaluation process are you measuring your students?

>I try to get the student involved in this process. A police officer will have different reasons for studying than an overweight senior citizen, wanting to lose 50 pounds while learning an art he can practice for the the next 20 years. While I use the IUKF international standards and requirements for promotions to act as a guide, the policeman's goals (and therefore my process for evaluation) will be much different then the overweight senior.

5. What other training or programs do you offer in your dojo, and if none WHY?

>I encourage my brown belts to pick a "specialty" program that is offered by IUKF. Soon, I hope to be adding the "Reality" specialty program to all my students. :)

Pick one and provide your comments and opinions on...

Thanks

Dave

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"Do or do not. there is no try!"


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 12:49 pm 
quote
"1. Where do you go for more information on saving your life?"

Well that is a big question :D .I view a healthy life style free of stress and full of optimism as the thing to aim for......no good being a fat guy with a gun who can kill all the baddies but has a coronary :lol:

On a more general note for real Ma I read newspapers about attacks etc and you can glean some interesting facts, although I shouldn't say this in our politically correct times, I noticed recently the propensity of knives used by Somalis.most recently when a somali women knived an English woman in the neck, fatally, over an argument about their kids playing :evil: .so now I hate to say it if I'm ever in an argument with a somali, my knife will be out first :lol:

also as I work within the law I get to see all the crimes committed in my area, so I know the bad places and I know what the latest trends are in violence, the new fads in weapons etc :wink:


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 1:05 pm 
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Good tip "jorvik".

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"Do or do not. there is no try!"


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2006 3:41 am 
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Hello, Dave,

Great to see your new Forum.

I want to thank George for providing a link on the front page news otherwise I wouldn't know. I usually do not visit the forums much due to lack of time (nooo, I am not one of those "in hiding" :roll: )

I would like to make a comment to the following question:

2. At what point does a professional in martial arts stops learning? Dave[/quote]

There are various types of "learning". "Learning" does not necessarily require physical learning activities. I don't think a "martial artist" can stop learning even if he wants to.

When I teach I learn. When I walk around in the streets I learn. Every time I watch someone performs or demonstrates I learn. Every time I watch the UFC I learn. When someone gives me the "look" in a bar I learn. When that big Finland guy getting ready to jump me in a bar (in China recently) for talking to "his" girl I learn (chalk up another successful use of the Wa-uke). Whenever I screwed up I learn. So there----

Best wishes--

Henry
www.selfdefense-lessons.com


Last edited by hthom on Sat Aug 26, 2006 4:43 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2006 3:52 am 
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gmattson wrote:
Good tip "jorvik".


Well George..this is what we are bringing to the IUKF community and the other martial artists around the world. We will be ready to lauch our system's training and certification in Jan of 2007. We will only have a small group attending so the first 16 to sign up and register will be selected......there is an old saying..."Safe your folk because the best is yet to come!

Dave


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2006 1:22 pm 
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Hope your trip home was safe. How is your foot healing? Good I hope. I reviewed your web site and it looks good...

I am hoping to see you in FL when we do the Realist Systems Certification in Jan.... George will have the details.

Have a good one.

Dave


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 29, 2006 12:07 am 
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Good questions, Dave:

Dave Young wrote:
1. Where do you go for more information on saving your life?


I read about two books a week, and check out the source material if it seems fishy. I have friends on the ground in some very high-risk professions and I keep my eyes open in a very high-risk environment. But in the end, it's about attention and awareness in the moment and a realistic evaluation of reality. The trouble with dealing with snakes all day is that some times you go home and everything sounds like it's hissing.

Dave Young wrote:
2. At what point does a professional in martial arts stops learning?


Same point an effective human being stops learning- if you stagnate, it's done. That said, at some point in your training you have to step back and evaluate what you've learned. Just collecting techniques or memorizing words or strategies has no value. You are less likely to be killed by a lack of knowledge than by an overabundance of false knowledge, IM (professional)O

3
Dave Young wrote:
. How often do you change your program when you are instructing?


The stuff I teach officers is principles and awareness based, so I could teach the same class to beginners and experts and both will get a good deal from it, and I could stick with the format almost indefinitely and the students would grow. My private students are different. Most are experienced martial artists and want me to teach them about violence. Very few of them need much training on body mechanics- most of their problems fall under the headings of awareness, initiative and permission. Training time tends to be spent pushing until I find a hole, weakness or hesitation in one of the three areas and we work on that.

So, to answer the question simply, the student writes the lesson plan new each day.

Dave Young wrote:
4. What scale or evaluation process are you measuring your students?


Good question, because this almost cries out for an objective measure and I haven't seen an objective measure (fitness, tournament records, size, certifications) that ever translated into real-world ability. Probably the two most important to me are: 1) How much effort and attention do I need to keep from getting injured when we mix it up and 2) How easy is it to get them mentally off balance.

Dave Young wrote:
5. What other training or programs do you offer in your dojo, and if none WHY?


Again- private lessons, mostly. What we'll cover will range over communications, violence dynamics, criminal mindset and crime, de-escalation, weapons from improvised to rifles, identifying threats, use-of-force legalities, history, anatomy, animal behavior, evolutionary psychology... advanced first aid and tracking if I think it's relevant. Because you can't separate anything, especially violence, from its context.


Again, good questions.

Rory


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 29, 2006 5:29 am 
Rory: Speaking of books what about yours? Is it going to be available for purchase soon? (I hope. :D )


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2006 10:54 am 
Another thought though is instinct :) .......Years ago my wife was sitting at her desk at work, when she suddenly felt the urge to move.seconds later an old Chimney came crashing through the ceiling and onto her desk :roll: ...............would have killed her, gotta go with the vibe.if it feelssuspicious start moving :wink:


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2006 2:26 pm 
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As September comes to a close, here are my last responses to these questions...A BIG THANK YOU out to everyone who took the time to responded....

1. Where do you go for more information on saving your life?

One of the main problems I have found throughout the United States especially...is that we get comfortable. Without testing your physical skills in a real life arena and only in the practice mode, we get into a comfortable level that this is all we need to know, or hey I got what it takes....ALL of those may be very true, but the most important one is will I really react like I need too.....This is why low and high simulation drills and exercises are so important...

Since learning comes from a variety of venues, here are a few additional options....

Books - Reading about what others do that you do as well; your goal should be a minimum of 3-4 book per year...
Research - Internet is a great resource for this, go look at what others do...1 of 3 things will come out of this....1-You will be happy you are doing what you do, 2- You will learn another way of communicating with your students making them better then you...or 3..STOP the presses we are wrong and need to review and change what we are doing now...

Attending other Training Programs and Seminars - Meeting other professionals in your field is not only vital in staying on top of what you do, but it is important for personal and professional growth but for the many friends and relationships you will build...

Teaching what you know a few times a year - This is one of the most important parts of professional growth in my opinion..The ole saying,"We learn as we teach, is very true
Reviewing your own personal skills - Since physical skills are a perishable element it is very important to always re-evaluate yourself in not only what you know to be true but what you are physically able to execute.



2. At what point does a professional in martial arts stops learning?

This ws definitely a double sided question...learning is a process we never out grow however if we do not reach out to others in our field or hobby we will never really know what we are missing..

3. How often do you change your program when you are instructing?

Consistency, Physically and Mentally challenging our students is something that should never get stale or old...As the goal of every parent have for their own children is that when we die they are able to take care of themselves....our job as a Master/Teacher/Trainer is to mentor, empower, and nurture our students...So, with this comes many responsibilities...As a teacher we assume the greatest of all responsibilities given to man kind...."The preservation of an human life."

So we need to not only continue in our personal growth but in the growth of our students and we can not do this by not furthering more of own education and skill building. We need to have our programs build on a solid foundation that allows for growth from within, and provide vehicles to evolve to stay with the ever changing times...


4. What scale or evaluation process are you measuring your students?

Removing personal opinion from your grading process is very important, it not only confuses students but eliminates the confusion during a testing process....NOT all student move through material at the same pace...having pre-test to judge the students skills are very important...nothing beats sitting them down after a test and showing them their mistakes.....TESTING is not the ending of the training but the first stage of their application for success.

Point systems have been proven to be a better and more accurate judge of a person skills and ability......"What do you call a student who graduates last in medical school......DOCTOR..scary uh...If done right you can remove this fear by ensuring your students add a preparation section as part of their grading...just a thought.


5. What other training or programs do you offer in your dojo, and if none WHY?

Remember that a large majority of your student base have full time jobs outside of the circle we live in who do this every day of our lives and for some of us as a profession. In addition to their traditional training. Here are a few suggestions:

1. Skill Building Seminars
2. Power Development Workshops
3. Scenario base Programs
4. Force of Force Training
5. Bringing in outside resources (Especially ones who support the philosophies you have been teaching....(YOU CAN NEVER BE A HERO IN YOUR OWN HOME TOWN!)
Above are only a few of the options you have...

Again THANKS to all who particpated in this Septembers questions.....Look for OCTOBER questions soon!

Stay Strong, Stay Safe,and more importantly STAY A LIVE!

Dave


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