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 Post subject: Re: Thoughts
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 12:16 pm 
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Now let's take a trip on over to engineering. The understanding of this concept got me 3 years of summer jobs at Teledyne Hastings Raydist, where they designed, manufactured, and sold navigation systems. That kind of navigation system was used before the invention of GPS, which is dependent on satellites orbiting the earth. This engineering concept however is still ubiquitous in modern technology.

Again... look for key words and concepts.

- Bill
Wikipedia wrote:
A phase-locked loop or phase lock loop (PLL) is a control system that generates an output signal whose phase is related to the phase of an input "reference" signal. It is an electronic circuit consisting of a variable frequency oscillator and a phase detector. This circuit compares the phase of the input signal with the phase of the signal derived from its output oscillator and adjusts the frequency of its oscillator to keep the phases matched. The signal from the phase detector is used to control the oscillator in a feedback loop.

Frequency is the derivative of phase. Keeping the input and output phase in lock step implies keeping the input and output frequencies in lock step. Consequently, a phase-locked loop can track an input frequency, or it can generate a frequency that is a multiple of the input frequency. The former property is used for demodulation, and the latter property is used for indirect frequency synthesis.

Phase-locked loops are widely employed in radio, telecommunications, computers and other electronic applications. They can be used to recover a signal from a noisy communication channel, generate stable frequencies at a multiple of an input frequency (frequency synthesis), or distribute clock timing pulses in digital logic designs such as microprocessors. Since a single integrated circuit can provide a complete phase-locked-loop building block, the technique is widely used in modern electronic devices, with output frequencies from a fraction of a hertz up to many gigahertz.


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 Post subject: Re: Thoughts
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 12:23 pm 
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In the same Wikipedia article, the author attempts to explain how the concept works using an analogy.

- Bill

Wikipedia wrote:
For a practical idea of what is going on, consider an auto race. There are many cars, and the driver of each of them wants to go around the track as fast as possible. Each lap corresponds to a complete cycle, and each car will complete dozens of laps per hour. The number of laps per hour (a speed) corresponds to an angular velocity (i.e. a frequency), but the number of laps (a distance) corresponds to a phase (and the conversion factor is the distance around the track loop).

During most of the race, each car is on its own and the driver of the car is trying to beat the driver of every other car on the course, and the phase of each car varies freely.

However, if there is an accident, a pace car comes out to set a safe speed. None of the race cars are permitted to pass the pace car (or the race cars in front of them), but each of the race cars wants to stay as close to the pace car as it can. While it is on the track, the pace car is a reference, and the race cars become phase-locked loops. Each driver will measure the phase difference (a distance in laps) between him and the pace car. If the driver is far away, he will increase his engine speed to close the gap. If he's too close to the pace car, he will slow down. The result is all the race cars lock on to the phase of the pace car. The cars travel around the track in a tight group that is a small fraction of a lap.


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 Post subject: Re: Thoughts
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 12:31 pm 
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Are some athletes good musicians? Are musicians athletes?

How do these guys do this? How do they make such a wonderful sound?

Image

Are they waiting to respond to the note of the person beside them? Because guess what... if they do, then this group is going to sound like sheet.

;)

- Bill


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 Post subject: Re: Thoughts
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 12:50 pm 
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Here's the explanation of classical conditioning - a technique used to produce an involuntary response.

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That's OK, kitty. I've got your number... :P

Image

- Bill


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 Post subject: Re: Thoughts
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 2:01 pm 
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Now let's take good (that's key...) operant conditioning and phase-lock loops, and consider Glenn's example of what Chuck Norris was doing while mentally preparing himself for a match.

Van Canna wrote:
The best fighters encourage in not looking for particular cues , but to observe everything that is happening , not an exercise in looking for triggers but an exercise in mindful watching , shutting of the internal chatter and trying to absorb every detail from every sense .


Can you paint the full picture in your conscious mind?

Don't worry about the unconscious mind. If you bring a full deck to the table and you've been schooled well, the unconscious brain will do what it will do.

Just try not to fuk things up by getting in the way of it. ;)

- Bill


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 Post subject: Re: Thoughts
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 6:26 pm 
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Good points Bill.

I agree that overthinking can be destructive, but 'self educating' is not, and I think you agree with this.

In the very complex field of dealing with violence, chock full with the potential of serious consequences, continuous education, is very healthy, and the key to better chances of making it in one piece.

We, as practitioners, and most important, as teachers of concepts that deal with violence, have an obligation to continue in this self education for the benefit of our students, if for no othe reason.

Take the 'operant conditioning' concept under discussion. We all know that operant conditioning does work, yet, as I have pointed out over the years, we must be careful of what we 'condition to operate' _

If what we condition to operate is not congruent with what our natural reflexive responses want us to do under the stress of combat, we will respond out of confusing signals.

One good example of this was shown to Maloney and I during the 'Duelatron' adrenaline stress scenarios we underwent at the Lethal Force Institute under master combat instructor John Farnam, a former Marine.

http://www.defense-training.com/whatis.html

Jim and I saw that the people who had been trained previously to respond to certain cues when facing impending violence or death by armed opponents, were quickly pronounced 'dead' by Mr. Farnam when failing the multiple threat scenarios arranged in the 'Duelatron' _

It was more than a bit embarrassing to have John command you to unload your gun and put it back in your holster, as you had no further need for it as a stiff ready for the morgue.

Again, an example of the previously ingrained wrong 'condition' which surfaced to 'operating' in a confused, fumbling manner, under a moment of great stress, when basic instincts to respond in certain ways, conflicted with what they had programmed to believe was the correct way to survive.

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 Post subject: Re: Thoughts
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 6:35 pm 
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This advice should sound familiar to some of us
Quote:
So what can we as Instructors, coaches, and teacher do to incorporate the most current research in the field of Fear and Survival Skills Training?

• Absorb the above noted information and research it yourself
• Seek out instructors, coaches, trainers that are using this research in their training. You will be surprised that there are few that do.

Bruce Siddle and his PPCT management systems is also a leader in the field of SSR, as it relates to motor skill performance in combative training.

• Train on the concept of "commonality of technique." The initial plan "A" strategy that I use in an unexpected spontaneous assault (be it armed or unarmed), is no different than in an attack that I do see coming. Why, because no matter if the brain goes "high road" or "low road", my "congruent" gross motor skills will work in both paths. This is a definite tactical advantage.

• Understand that although the "low road" reflexive motor responses cannot be changed, they can be "molded" to fit a combative motor skill technique that are useable during a spontaneous attack.

• I use the Somatic Reflex Potentiation response, which I call "penetrate and dominate," in all my programs.


I know you know who wrote this, Bill.

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 Post subject: Re: Thoughts
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 6:45 pm 
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And here is a true 'living legend'

http://www.worldblackbelt.com/Living_Le ... ,_John.asp

Maloney and I often quip about how fortunate we were to have been able to train under his guidance.

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 Post subject: Re: Thoughts
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 6:49 pm 
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This tells the whole story as far as I am concerned:
Quote:
In an era when Martial Arts are confused with theatrics, "reel" with "real" and fantasy is all too often accepted as reality; when our arts are flooded with more "talk the talk" than "walk the walk," John goes quietly about the business of continuous improvement.

Not content to rest on the laurels of reputation and past triumphs, John forges ahead, a true Sensei, always seeking a better way.

"Willingness is a state of mind, readiness is a statement of fact. Find a way to win, not to lose, there is precious little time to do both. We learn not by success but by failure and by failing in training we learn to not practice our mistakes," says John.

John S. Farnam is a modern day Samurai, a Sensei whose teachings have saved countless lives, documented time and time again by students who have "faced the elephant" and lived to tell the tales. John embodies all that is good and noble in the American male, a patriot who calls it like it is less fluff and sugar coated window dressing, for John has no use for gimmicks and gadgets, bells and whistles. John Farnam's spurs were earned by his skills.

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 Post subject: Re: Thoughts
PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2012 3:55 am 
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Who said Chuck Norris was a "Good fighter"??? Dude's TKD right??? :mrgreen:

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 Post subject: Re: Thoughts
PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2012 3:41 pm 
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Stevie B wrote:
Who said Chuck Norris was a "Good fighter"??? Dude's TKD right??? :mrgreen:

Actually his primary style is Tang Soo Do. The character origin of the name is 唐手道 which is the old way of writing kara te do. It translates as China hand way. On Okinawa and Japan, they nationalized the name by changing the China character (唐) to the empty character (空) giving us 空手道. In the Japanese language the two words were homonyms, so the change happened without the confusion of a name change - if that makes sense.

Tang Soo Do is indeed a Korean art.

George has met Chuck Norris. He's a good guy and a good martial artist. And he's very good at marketing his martial persona. Here's a good example.

..... Top 50 Chuck Norris Facts & Jokes

- Bill


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 Post subject: Re: Thoughts
PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2012 4:53 pm 
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TSD= Norris, is right. TSD is more like karate than TKD is.

TSD is primarily a striking art focusing heavily on striking with hands and feet. TKD is 70% kicks.

George and I met Chuck Norris at the All American championships, Madison Square Garden, NY _a yearly event run by Henry Cho.

Chuck Norris is a gentleman who never bragged about his prowess. He left his consummate skills, in technique, speed and power, do the talking for him.

One memorable match I witnessed, besides his final match with Joe Lewis, was the one against Moto Yamakura, Japanese Goju, who hailed from a collegiate group of fighters under the tutelage of a Samurai descendant sensei, that George met in his travels to Japan.

Both Moto Yamakura and Taro Tanaka [the street fighter] were invited to visit the Mattson Academy and they did. They were both collegiate champions of the whole of Japan.

The most conditioned fearless fighters I ever had the pleasure of meeting. They became the terror of my sparring class I was running at the time.

Their shins and feet were so conditioned; they would practice kicking the brick wall at the end of the dojo and the bottom of the unpadded makiwara full force for 500 reps or more.

George can relate how the fought in Japan…vicious matches, with a downed opponent having to crawl out of the ring in shame if put down.

Taro Tanaka was strictly a 'street thug' by the warnings Moto had given all of us when they joined my class. He was indeed a handful…Dave Finkelstein still talks about one dragged out match I had with Taro on the dojo floor.

With this background in mind….Taro ended up against Joe Lewis for the quarter finals, and Joe had his hands full as well.

Now Moto Yamakura faced Chuck Norris in the quarter finals. Just to get to the quarter finals in the 'All American' of the day was a prodigious feat.

I saw Chuck Norris totally dismantle Moto with some of the fastest and knock down power kicks coming at him from all directions. Moto was floored several times and eventually unable to continue.

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 Post subject: Re: Thoughts
PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2012 4:55 pm 
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Quote:
• Train on the concept of "commonality of technique." The initial plan "A" strategy that I use in an unexpected spontaneous assault (be it armed or unarmed), is no different than in an attack that I do see coming. Why, because no matter if the brain goes "high road" or "low road", my "congruent" gross motor skills will work in both paths. This is a definite tactical advantage.


Image

Quote:
• Understand that although the "low road" reflexive motor responses cannot be changed, they can be "molded" to fit a combative motor skill technique that are useable during a spontaneous attack.


Image

Image

Image

Image


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 Post subject: Re: Thoughts
PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2012 5:11 pm 
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Now as to TSD_

A most formidable style and a way of training we learned about some of the fighters we came up against in tournaments. Very unique fighters, that bunch. Talk about penetration and domination.

http://www.cheezictsd.com/

Bobby Cheezic would bring over from his Connecticut Dojo, for George's tournaments_ some real killer fighters, who trained in kicking and punching trees.

And they were the terror of a tournament floor, as they came at you with the intent to break you in half. George will remember.

Once I fought their heavyweight champion in a semi-pro fight on a Connecticut stage, where Art Rabesa, Nev Kimbrell, and I_ were invited to fight for money.

Tough customers all right.

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 Post subject: Re: Thoughts
PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 3:35 am 
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Hahahaha... I know Chuck Norris is Old School Bad ass!!! Just messing with you Vann Sensei!!But cool to hear the old stories though!! If guys trained like you guys did back then, we would all be better off..... Ps... The Japanese guys sound like Yakuza to me.. OH NO!!! Kowaii deyo!!! :D :D :D

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