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 Post subject: Re: Your potential enemy
PostPosted: Mon Dec 24, 2012 3:29 am 
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good discussion , agreed , and yes what I was referring too

awareness of the situation and awareness of yourself

good comments


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 Post subject: Re: Your potential enemy
PostPosted: Mon Dec 24, 2012 7:10 am 
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Quite true, when you think that in the end you need to learn from the right people in becoming good at recognizing situations and at strategizing in order to solve the problem regardless of what we think we know and how good we imagine we are.

For example, during the 'duelatron' training Maloney and I took under the famous John Farnam...

http://www.worldblackbelt.com/Living_Le ... ,_John.asp

....I came up against a shack with a closed front door and cries of help from within...he told me to enter it and clear the threat...I had a loaded .45 pistol in my hands...

Question: How/what_ would you have done or said to John at that moment?

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 Post subject: Re: Your potential enemy
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2012 2:04 pm 
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Quote
"Quite true, when you think that in the end you need to learn from the right people in becoming good at recognizing situations and at strategizing in order to solve the problem regardless of what we think we know and how good we imagine we are."

That's a difficult one, the right people, who are they? and also how good are we ? another great question, plus how do we measure how good the right people are, and if they are good enought to teach us? maybe they are not as good as we imagine ourselves or them to be.

I have trained with folks within a certain martial art who have trained with accepted Chinese masters, actually trained in China , and on a fairly regular basis.
They have thought themselves skilled, but then I've trained with other people with other Chinese masters who are light years ahead of them in technique and ability.this is in a couple of arts. I believe that it would be the same in western arts . If you have trained in multiple martial arts then you will find people telling you something that is a secret strategy, a powerfull technique .when in other styles it's just a very basic move.

Real world violence isn't about how tough you are usually it's about how callous you are, nice people don't know this, can't comprehend it and very probably can't be trained in it.
In the place that I spent my childhood which was a large shopping area, a local gangster was shot dead.only a teenager, but word got out that all the shops had to close when his funneral entourage went past. The local police heard about this and said that every where must stay open, that it was wrong that they should be intimidated by gangs.....when his entourage went past all the shops were closed. they knew more than the police, when you grow up in an area like that you understand..now if you want to get even with somebody in that environment how would you go about it?


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 Post subject: Re: Your potential enemy
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2012 3:59 pm 
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Ray,

We have been down this beaten path again and again.

Let's review the essentials one more time:

1. There are no guarantees of anything in this life…there are, however, generally accepted proven methods of tactics that have demonstrated a reasonable percentage of success, i.e., a collective of concepts, skills and techniques based on modern (contemporary) conflict situations that the practitioner is likely to encounter in his or her environment.

2. Again there are no guarantees of expectations…these will always remain a question mark regardless of any type of training you might receive, just like a trained soldier in combat. And expectations will vary with individuals who have received the same training, based on who and what they are as a person, and what baggage they take to the training and eventual application of such.

3. Again, as students, we should be looking for someone who can convey/teach "a collective of concepts, skills and techniques based on modern (contemporary) conflict situations that the practitioner is likely to encounter in his or her environment."

4. But first the student must do his own home work to determine what these concepts, skills and common sense, combat proven techniques are, and more important_ what they mean to him personally_

5. Generally, as to techniques, the student must look for relatively few techniques that are simple to learn/perform_ are practical, efficient and effective under stress.

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 Post subject: Re: Your potential enemy
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2012 4:00 pm 
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6. Once a student feels, based on individual need and understanding, that he has recognized what these concepts and techniques are_ then he needs to seek out someone or more who can teach them_ here all students may differ based on their own personality and baggage.

7. This is a complex, ever evolving field, and the student must seek out the companion complementing disciplines and their teachers. You will know if these teachers have the qualifications you are looking for, if you first take the time to learn what these 'common sense combat proven concepts' are _ looking to what most law enforcement, military and civilians generally embrace.

8. Learning any martial art, any technique from any teacher, is only the first step. A student must complement this with more specialized tactical knowledge.

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 Post subject: Re: Your potential enemy
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2012 4:02 pm 
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9. Who possesses this knowledge? Let's take a look at a John Farnam, as an example
Quote:
The most impressive character trait of John Farnam is that he doesn't seek to impress anyone. He seeks only to inspire and he does so by setting the example and leading the charge. You won't find John Farnam "in the rear with the gear." As an old Marine Staff Non-Commissioned Officer, the greatest compliment I can pay a retired Officer is to say that I'd follow his lead in battle anywhere, anytime and in any place.

John is a man that "I'd ride the river with." I've known only three other men in sixty years that I'd trust with my life and that's what a Westerner does when he "rides the river" with another. In fifty plus years of Martial Arts study I've been fortunate of having been blessed with the opportunity to study with a few great teachers and among that elite fraternity there are but two that I have called mentor.

John Farnam is one of the two, a Martial Artist who quotes from the Go Rin No Sho and the Sun Tsu with the ease that politicians forget campaign promises.

In an era when Martial Arts are confused with theatrics, "reel" with "real" and fantasy is all too often accepted as reality; when our arts are flooded with more "talk the talk" than "walk the walk," John goes quietly about the business of continuous improvement.

Not content to rest on the laurels of reputation and past triumphs, John forges ahead, a true Sensei, always seeking a better way. "Willingness is a state of mind, readiness is a statement of fact. Find a way to win, not to lose, there is precious little time to do both. We learn not by success but by failure and by failing in training we learn to not practice our mistakes," says John.


There are others with similar qualifications…the student must seek them out.

Here I have mentioned people like Rory Miller and Mas Ayoob as other examples.

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 Post subject: Re: Your potential enemy
PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2012 4:03 pm 
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10. The student is there not only to learn what the instructor knows, but to learn why the instructor thinks what he is doing is better. He wants the how and the why.

Whatever he is learning must generally be applicable under all conditions and be able to function under the most stressful situations with a high percentage of success…and this learning must contain some "adaptability" as well…where within simplicity of execution there can be adaptability to what the fight brings you.

This is really all we can hope for.

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 Post subject: Re: Your potential enemy
PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2012 2:18 pm 
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The proper qualifications: John Farnam

>>EDUCATION:

Cornell College, Iowa, BA Biology, Chemistry, 1967
U.S.M.C. Commissioned Second Lieutenant, 1968
Wisconsin Dept. Of Justice, Narcotics and Dangerous Drug Enforcement, 1971

Western Wisconsin Technical Institute. Certified Police Officer, 1971
U. S. Marine Corps Institute, Land Mines, Explosives and Demolitions, 1972

Wisconsin Dept. Of Justice, Motor Vehicle Search And Seizure, 1974
Wisconsin Dept. Of Health, Certified Emergency Medical Technician, 1975
Western Wisconsin Technical Institute, Associate Degree, Mechanical Engineering, 1975

Illinois Dept. Of Law Enforcement, Defensive Tactics, 1977

U. S. Army Infantry Advanced Course, Ft. Benning, Georgia, 1977

National Rifle Assn. Certified Police Instructor, 1977 to present
American Pistol Institute, Practical Defensive Handgun, 1979
National Rifle Assn. Certified Police Armorer, 1980

U. S. Army Command And General Staff College, Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas, 1980

American Society Of Industrial Security, Current Terrorist Tactics, 1982
CERTIFIED

NRA Certified Police Firearms Instructor
Law Enforcement Firearms Instructor, International Assn. Of Law Enforcement Firearms Instructors
Distinguished Expert, National Forensic Center

Individual Voluntary Practical Pistol Instructor
Certified Instructor, Certified User, Special Purpose Low-Lethality
Anti-Terrorist Munitions (SPLLATM-ASI)
Monadnock PR-24 Instructor
Glock Pistol Armorer
Colorado State Board Private Occupational Credential For Security Services

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS

Police Marksman Association
Distinguished Experts, National Forensic Center
International Assn. Of Law Enforcement Firearms Instructors
American Society Of Law Enforcement Trainers
National Rifle Association <<

Jim Maloney and I consider ourselves lucky to have been able to train under him.

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