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PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 6:30 pm 
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVueW6X7TM0

This gives some idea of how we can move.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 7:19 pm 
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Probably the best way to think of stepping movements in relation to attack is to visualize where the opponent's 'power zone' is.

In most cases it is the midline.

What works well is to angle out of the power zone about 45 degrees [1 0r 11 o'clock] causing the opponent to have to turn to engage. As you flank on the oblique you try to step behind the adversary and hit him from multiple angles to shut him down from being able turn to initiate a counter attack and limiting his range of motion.

This is where the take down/knock down skills are useful where you have space and time to engage others, or to move to 'get the hell out of there' _

…at that close range think of knees to the back of the legs, to the small of his back, and knees/shins to the coccyx _ torpedo stomps to the back of the legs, chopping sweeps, neck twist take downs and elbow strikes.

Image

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2013 6:56 am 
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Josann:

Here is an older write up from a drill I have used to teach movement.

Sorry no video of this drill (although the member’s portion of my site has a 22 minute clip on movement. Shameless plug. :oops: )


1. Moving from absorption to closing.

2. Moving from focusing on the block to focusing on the strike.

My personal philosophy is one I saw on Jim Maloney’s tape. I believe in focusing on the strike not the “block.” I also like to look on the “block” more as an interception or deflection but that is neither here nor there for this post.

Movement serves a two fold position:

1. Avoid the lines of force
2. Achieve a more strategic position.


There are only three ways to avoid a line of force or some combination of the three.

Major Movements:

Absorption:

Absorption is moving away from the line of force. This is often the best response when you detect the line of force when it is well in motion. Absorption can be accomplished in a number of different manners, however, all absorption must be followed by Closing or you will enter a defensive mindset and fail.

Slipping:

Slipping is sliding off the line of force. This is done when you have detected the generation of force but it is already traveling towards you. When ever possible slipping should be down to the outside to distance yourself from the aggressors weapons. When facing a hooking strike going outside is not often an option.

Closing:

Closing is done properly by moving towards the line of force but at a slightly oblique angle so as not to encounter the line of force directly. Closing can only be done by detecting the generation of a line of force early before it has traveled far (if at all).

All of the major movements can also be done by pivoting the body or feet in close.

The first avoidance people learn is absorption. This is true in the traditional Kumites and in most places. The reason for this is that absorption is the avoidance principle that can be done at the end of the attack and therefore you do not need to read it early.

At some point we want to transition people to higher levels of avoidance and that timing may be different for each school.

What I want to throw out is a progression that seems to have smooth transition. I will set these out for a straight attack and then in the next posts a hooking one and there will be a combination at the end.

The straight punch. This can be any straight attack but to match what is common in most schools let’s just work with a step through reverse punch. The attack becomes irrelevant as long as it comes straight in. (I would work with a lead hand but the step through reverse might feel more common to some.)

For example sake you are both in a left stance.

The attacker steps in with a right punch to the TOP of your chest. (Top of the chest because as you work the drill your partner should start to really try and nail the strike – less blood…)

STEP ONE (Absorption):

Begin by working just the movement.

Absorption works by moving the foot farthest away from the direction of the incoming force away from the force and off line. Therefore you pivot on the ball of your left foot as you move your right foot off the line of fire. This means it moves back so that you end up facing your partner’s back. (Your partner should penetrate with their punch.)

Watch the foot that remains to ensure it is pivoting or the knee is suffering from torque and is vulnerable to attack.

If people are “blocking” the incoming punch rather than using movement to avoid then have them put their hands behind their back.

Do this a few times and now when you step off line with your right foot try to focus on turning so that you strike your partner with your left shoulder.

Do this a number of times until you are comfortable with that closeness.

Now you can do the same movement with your right foot but use your left forearm or Boshiken or heel palm or punch to strike. An elbow works but is nasty. However the focus has to remain like you had on the shoulder strike the pivot and step now become the mechanics for the strike.

Once they have this they can raise the right hand to check the incoming arm.

STEP TWO (Absorption):

Okay now instead of stepping the right foot off the line we leave our feet where they are and let our right shoulder swing back and avoid by absorption through a body pivot. Focus on the left shoulder coming FORWARD. The feet can pivot.

This is the same “body” pivot as moving your feet but done mostly with a relaxed torso.

Do this a few times and now when you pivot your right shoulder back to get off line try to focus on turning so that you strike your partner with your left shoulder. (If you are focusing on the left shoulder this may already be happening.)

Again this may take some getting used to so do worry about adding speed to the attack until you achieve some comfort.

Now you can do the same movement with your right side of the body but use your left forearm or Boshiken or heel palm or punch. However the focus has to remain like you had on the shoulder strike the pivot of the body now becomes the mechanics for the strike.


STEP THREE (Slipping):

Same attack only now we keep the body pivot and continue to let the right shoulder drop back to get off the line only this time as we pivot our body we step forward and out with our LEFT foot into a modified horse stance like the one used in the elbow strikes in the Uechi basic Kata. You do not move the right foot you allow your stance to lengthen.

Now do the same step with your left foot and body pivot with the right shoulder but now add in that left forearm strike or Boshiken or heel palm or punch. (The elbow strike works great here but is nasty.) Remember this strike happens because of the body pivot so it lands AS your left foot lands.

This step actually moves into slipping and closing.

STEP FOUR (Slipping):

Same as Step Three only this time as you step out and forward with your left foot you also allow your right foot to pull up behind it so you end in Sanchin and not a modified horse stance. Speed up that step forward.

Now do the same step with your left foot and body pivot with the right shoulder but now add in that left forearm strike or Boshiken or heel palm or punch. (The elbow strike works great here but is nasty.) Remember this strike happens because of the body pivot so it lands AS your left foot lands.

STEP FIVE (Closing):

Okay now you are moving off the line of fire and moving IN on the aggressor. This is closing. But we want to add an option.

This time instead of hitting with your left arm (the FOCUS of the move) and checking with your right we get slightly farther off line and strike with our right hand (forearm etc.) using the left hand to simply deflect and control the aggressor’s arm.

At the end of step five you have moved from pure absorption to pure closing.

An incoming hook:

STEP SIX (Closing):

The ellipse.

If you have trouble visualizing this take a belt and lay it out between you and your partner in an ellipse.

As your partner steps through with a right punch move your forward foot along the ellipse to slip out then close back in.

Now adjust to add the strike.

Hooking Strikes:

I like Robb Finlayson’s way of practicing this. You stand in front of your partner at a distance they can reach out and touch your shoulder. They will come in and try to swing their arm up and around your neck to place you in a head lock.

This is the same movement as a hooking sucker punch. It forces the aggressive partner to close on the move (as would happen in RL.) And it is a little safer than if they get to clock someone.

Avoiding the incoming line of force can be achieved in two ways. The line of force is (somewhat) horizontal arch coming in from one side through your head and continuing in onward back towards the aggressor.

You can get off line by stepping back out of the arch or you can step inside the arch.

Stepping back always gives your opponent the chance to continue.

Stepping in places you in range to hit.

So when we absorb here we will come inside the line of force.

STEP ONE (Absorption):

Begin by working just the movement. RIGHT HOOK SUCKER PUNCH:

Absorption works by moving the foot farthest away from the direction of the incoming force away form the force and off line. Therefore your right foot (for their right punch) is farthest away. You move your right foot forward and slightly to your right. This brings you in close to the aggressor with your right shoulder.

If people are “blocking” the incoming punch have them put their hands behind their back.

Do this a few times and now when you step in out of the line of fire with your right foot try to focus on turning so that you strike your partner with your right shoulder.

Do this a number of times until you are comfortable with that closeness.

Now you can do the same movement with your right foot but use your right forearm or Boshiken or heel palm or punch to strike. An elbow works but is nasty. However the focus has to remain like you had on the shoulder strike the pivot and step now become the mechanics for the strike.

Once they have this they can raise the left hand to check the incoming arm.

STEP TWO (Absorption):

Okay now instead of stepping the right foot off the line we leave our feet where they are and let our right shoulder swing back and avoid by absorption through a body pivot.
Focus on the right shoulder coming forward and in close. The feet can pivot somewhat.

This is the same “body” pivot as moving your feet but done mostly with a relaxed torso.

Do this a few times and now when you pivot your right shoulder forward to get off line try to focus on turning so that you strike your partner with your right shoulder

Again this may take some getting used to so do worry about adding speed to the attack until you achieve some comfort.

Now you can do the same movement with your right foot but use your right forearm or Boshiken or heel palm or punch to strike. An elbow works but is nasty. However the focus has to remain like you had on the shoulder strike the pivot and step now become the mechanics for the strike.

STEP THREE (Closing):

Same attack only now we keep the body pivot and continue to let the right shoulder drive forward, and the left shoulder to torque backward, to get off the line only this time we step only forward (NO MOVEMENT TO THE RIGHT AT ALL) with our right foot and allow our left foot to advance as well so that we end in a good Sanchin.

Now you can do the same movement with your right foot but use your right forearm or Boshiken or heel palm or punch to strike. An elbow works but is nasty. However the focus has to remain like you had on the shoulder strike the pivot and step now become the mechanics for the strike.

Okay now you are moving off the line of fire and moving IN on the aggressor. This is closing.

Stepping IN to get off the line of fire means you are closing.

STEP FOUR (Closing):

The ellipse.

If you have trouble visualizing this take a belt and lay it out between you and your partner in an ellipse.

As your partner steps through with a right punch move your forward foot along the ellipse to slip out then close back in.

Now adjust to add the strike.

To do Step Four focus on the 45 degree rule. I want to intercept my partner at 45 degrees. And If you aren’t sure what that is stand in front of your partner and pivot until YOUR left hand touches HIS left shoulder = 45 degrees.

Try this concept of pivoting to hit the 45 degrees and see how it turns out.

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Rick Wilson - http://wpd-rc.com/


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2013 9:33 am 
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Rick Wilson wrote:
Josann:

Here is an older write up from a drill I have used to teach movement.

Sorry no video of this drill (although the member’s portion of my site has a 22 minute clip on movement. Shameless plug. :oops: )


1. Moving from absorption to closing.

2. Moving from focusing on the block to focusing on the strike.

My personal philosophy is one I saw on Jim Maloney’s tape. I believe in focusing on the strike not the “block.” I also like to look on the “block” more as an interception or deflection but that is neither here nor there for this post.

Movement serves a two fold position:

1. Avoid the lines of force
2. Achieve a more strategic position.


There are only three ways to avoid a line of force or some combination of the three.

Major Movements:

Absorption:

Absorption is moving away from the line of force. This is often the best response when you detect the line of force when it is well in motion. Absorption can be accomplished in a number of different manners, however, all absorption must be followed by Closing or you will enter a defensive mindset and fail.

Slipping:

Slipping is sliding off the line of force. This is done when you have detected the generation of force but it is already traveling towards you. When ever possible slipping should be down to the outside to distance yourself from the aggressors weapons. When facing a hooking strike going outside is not often an option.

Closing:

Closing is done properly by moving towards the line of force but at a slightly oblique angle so as not to encounter the line of force directly. Closing can only be done by detecting the generation of a line of force early before it has traveled far (if at all).

All of the major movements can also be done by pivoting the body or feet in close.

The first avoidance people learn is absorption. This is true in the traditional Kumites and in most places. The reason for this is that absorption is the avoidance principle that can be done at the end of the attack and therefore you do not need to read it early.

At some point we want to transition people to higher levels of avoidance and that timing may be different for each school.

What I want to throw out is a progression that seems to have smooth transition. I will set these out for a straight attack and then in the next posts a hooking one and there will be a combination at the end.

The straight punch. This can be any straight attack but to match what is common in most schools let’s just work with a step through reverse punch. The attack becomes irrelevant as long as it comes straight in. (I would work with a lead hand but the step through reverse might feel more common to some.)

For example sake you are both in a left stance.

The attacker steps in with a right punch to the TOP of your chest. (Top of the chest because as you work the drill your partner should start to really try and nail the strike – less blood…)

STEP ONE (Absorption):

Begin by working just the movement.

Absorption works by moving the foot farthest away from the direction of the incoming force away from the force and off line. Therefore you pivot on the ball of your left foot as you move your right foot off the line of fire. This means it moves back so that you end up facing your partner’s back. (Your partner should penetrate with their punch.)

Watch the foot that remains to ensure it is pivoting or the knee is suffering from torque and is vulnerable to attack.

If people are “blocking” the incoming punch rather than using movement to avoid then have them put their hands behind their back.

Do this a few times and now when you step off line with your right foot try to focus on turning so that you strike your partner with your left shoulder.

Do this a number of times until you are comfortable with that closeness.

Now you can do the same movement with your right foot but use your left forearm or Boshiken or heel palm or punch to strike. An elbow works but is nasty. However the focus has to remain like you had on the shoulder strike the pivot and step now become the mechanics for the strike.

Once they have this they can raise the right hand to check the incoming arm.

STEP TWO (Absorption):

Okay now instead of stepping the right foot off the line we leave our feet where they are and let our right shoulder swing back and avoid by absorption through a body pivot. Focus on the left shoulder coming FORWARD. The feet can pivot.

This is the same “body” pivot as moving your feet but done mostly with a relaxed torso.

Do this a few times and now when you pivot your right shoulder back to get off line try to focus on turning so that you strike your partner with your left shoulder. (If you are focusing on the left shoulder this may already be happening.)

Again this may take some getting used to so do worry about adding speed to the attack until you achieve some comfort.

Now you can do the same movement with your right side of the body but use your left forearm or Boshiken or heel palm or punch. However the focus has to remain like you had on the shoulder strike the pivot of the body now becomes the mechanics for the strike.


STEP THREE (Slipping):

Same attack only now we keep the body pivot and continue to let the right shoulder drop back to get off the line only this time as we pivot our body we step forward and out with our LEFT foot into a modified horse stance like the one used in the elbow strikes in the Uechi basic Kata. You do not move the right foot you allow your stance to lengthen.

Now do the same step with your left foot and body pivot with the right shoulder but now add in that left forearm strike or Boshiken or heel palm or punch. (The elbow strike works great here but is nasty.) Remember this strike happens because of the body pivot so it lands AS your left foot lands.

This step actually moves into slipping and closing.

STEP FOUR (Slipping):

Same as Step Three only this time as you step out and forward with your left foot you also allow your right foot to pull up behind it so you end in Sanchin and not a modified horse stance. Speed up that step forward.

Now do the same step with your left foot and body pivot with the right shoulder but now add in that left forearm strike or Boshiken or heel palm or punch. (The elbow strike works great here but is nasty.) Remember this strike happens because of the body pivot so it lands AS your left foot lands.

STEP FIVE (Closing):

Okay now you are moving off the line of fire and moving IN on the aggressor. This is closing. But we want to add an option.

This time instead of hitting with your left arm (the FOCUS of the move) and checking with your right we get slightly farther off line and strike with our right hand (forearm etc.) using the left hand to simply deflect and control the aggressor’s arm.

At the end of step five you have moved from pure absorption to pure closing.

An incoming hook:

STEP SIX (Closing):

The ellipse.

If you have trouble visualizing this take a belt and lay it out between you and your partner in an ellipse.

As your partner steps through with a right punch move your forward foot along the ellipse to slip out then close back in.

Now adjust to add the strike.

Hooking Strikes:

I like Robb Finlayson’s way of practicing this. You stand in front of your partner at a distance they can reach out and touch your shoulder. They will come in and try to swing their arm up and around your neck to place you in a head lock.

This is the same movement as a hooking sucker punch. It forces the aggressive partner to close on the move (as would happen in RL.) And it is a little safer than if they get to clock someone.

Avoiding the incoming line of force can be achieved in two ways. The line of force is (somewhat) horizontal arch coming in from one side through your head and continuing in onward back towards the aggressor.

You can get off line by stepping back out of the arch or you can step inside the arch.

Stepping back always gives your opponent the chance to continue.

Stepping in places you in range to hit.

So when we absorb here we will come inside the line of force.

STEP ONE (Absorption):

Begin by working just the movement. RIGHT HOOK SUCKER PUNCH:

Absorption works by moving the foot farthest away from the direction of the incoming force away form the force and off line. Therefore your right foot (for their right punch) is farthest away. You move your right foot forward and slightly to your right. This brings you in close to the aggressor with your right shoulder.

If people are “blocking” the incoming punch have them put their hands behind their back.

Do this a few times and now when you step in out of the line of fire with your right foot try to focus on turning so that you strike your partner with your right shoulder.

Do this a number of times until you are comfortable with that closeness.

Now you can do the same movement with your right foot but use your right forearm or Boshiken or heel palm or punch to strike. An elbow works but is nasty. However the focus has to remain like you had on the shoulder strike the pivot and step now become the mechanics for the strike.

Once they have this they can raise the left hand to check the incoming arm.

STEP TWO (Absorption):

Okay now instead of stepping the right foot off the line we leave our feet where they are and let our right shoulder swing back and avoid by absorption through a body pivot.
Focus on the right shoulder coming forward and in close. The feet can pivot somewhat.

This is the same “body” pivot as moving your feet but done mostly with a relaxed torso.

Do this a few times and now when you pivot your right shoulder forward to get off line try to focus on turning so that you strike your partner with your right shoulder

Again this may take some getting used to so do worry about adding speed to the attack until you achieve some comfort.

Now you can do the same movement with your right foot but use your right forearm or Boshiken or heel palm or punch to strike. An elbow works but is nasty. However the focus has to remain like you had on the shoulder strike the pivot and step now become the mechanics for the strike.

STEP THREE (Closing):

Same attack only now we keep the body pivot and continue to let the right shoulder drive forward, and the left shoulder to torque backward, to get off the line only this time we step only forward (NO MOVEMENT TO THE RIGHT AT ALL) with our right foot and allow our left foot to advance as well so that we end in a good Sanchin.

Now you can do the same movement with your right foot but use your right forearm or Boshiken or heel palm or punch to strike. An elbow works but is nasty. However the focus has to remain like you had on the shoulder strike the pivot and step now become the mechanics for the strike.

Okay now you are moving off the line of fire and moving IN on the aggressor. This is closing.

Stepping IN to get off the line of fire means you are closing.

STEP FOUR (Closing):

The ellipse.

If you have trouble visualizing this take a belt and lay it out between you and your partner in an ellipse.

As your partner steps through with a right punch move your forward foot along the ellipse to slip out then close back in.

Now adjust to add the strike.

To do Step Four focus on the 45 degree rule. I want to intercept my partner at 45 degrees. And If you aren’t sure what that is stand in front of your partner and pivot until YOUR left hand touches HIS left shoulder = 45 degrees.

Try this concept of pivoting to hit the 45 degrees and see how it turns out.


Thanks Rick. One thing I've learned when training with my son, who's had some muy thai training and a bit of boxing, is that my training has been inadequate in footwork and head movement. I discovered that I was also a sucker for a feint and that keeping my posture erect was going to get me killed I also could easily see that there is truth in the adage that "you can defend yourself successfully from someone you couldn't handle in a toe to to fight or sparring match."

What does work well in those sparring matches is the hands up and open of sanchin and the lifting of the knee to protect against kicks.

Great drills posted here by everyone. We do have a great system if we expand upon what we train and try to find ways to make it work for us. If we don't then we can complain, as I've seen many do over the years, that it's the system, the teacher,liability laws, or that dumb ass statement that karate doesn't work in a "real" fight.

Keepin' on training, having fun and hoping I never get to that "real fight" but just in case......


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2013 4:31 pm 
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Great post Rick and right on the money_I find myself using the same concepts on the floor. And Josann is correct about the inadequacy of footwork and head movement.

Watch most of us practice any kind of drills or free style. And sometimes you see an actual 'leading with the head' where an opponent, if he wants to, can smack the face at will.

This also stems from mostly practicing drills that don't use attacks to the face.

Jim Maloney has some great drills on 'slipping and sliding' especially when, as Rick points out, we will not have the luxury of always detecting incoming force/strikes well ahead of time while in the chaos of a fight and under the 'tunnel vision' effect.

The best rule to live by and try to keep uppermost in our practice is that even the best planned training concepts will fall afoul of circumstance and Murphy. In that case, a few simple things with a high probability of success practiced constantly will serve one well.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2013 4:17 am 
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If there is any "secret" to effectiveness in martial arts...

...when there is no other option but to engage...

Hit first..Hit hard...Keep hitting until the opponent is no longer a threat...

Doing so makes life a lot easier and requires very few techniques and/or tactics.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2013 5:28 am 
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Reading this thread makes me feel like a kid again, all agog over what we get out of Karate. I try not to read it before I go to bed (which is most of my computer time) because it keeps me all pumped up and I can't sleep.

Got me to thinking last night -

We've all taught a whole boot-load of students between us. Can you remember any two of them exactly alike? Especially at brown belt or higher? We've all shared the dojo besides a ridiculous amount of fellow students, some better than us, some not. Has there ever been two of us exactly alike? There's similarities between some of us, obviously, but usually more differences, regardless of how subtle those differences may be.

I don't study Okinawan Karate. But I love Okinawan Karate. It's what first hooked me on Martial Arts a long time ago. I first learned Sanchin as part of my American Karate training. My Instructor's background was in Okinawan Karate and his love for it was strong. The first year I was practicing Sanchin I happened to be travelling on a train. There was a wind storm that day, typical of sometimes crazy New England weather. I had given my seat to someone and was standing up, holding one of those overhead straps when we came to a straight-away in the middle of an open landscape. The wind rocked the train and several people faltered. But I had gotten into a Sanchin stance, I barely moved. It was like I was on a different plane than those staggering beside me.

That told me something right there.

What I get out of training, what I get out of preparation and what I get out of Sanchin is most likely quite different than what my dojo-mates get. And more than likely what anyone here gets. And it's all good. Real good.

P.S. - The next time you are on a shaky, fast train or bus, or on an air-plane in turbulence, or on any unstable surface - stand up and assume a Sanchin stance. It rocks.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2013 7:50 am 
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Patrick McCarthy taught me a weird sanchin with open hands, he convinced a Shotokan guy it was the Kata you should do if you were to do one more Kata

Found this bunch of folks online, doing this weird uechi karate and joined Vans page

Six months later a kiwi in the UK was practicing sanchin stance on the trains and tubes

Twelve months later, back in nz, couldn't let this form go, got a Canadian work permit , booked the plane ticket

Iupa uechi Ricks camp, Lairds club , never looked back.

Sanchin on a train rocks


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2013 9:09 am 
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Kind of a shift with this question but going to go there. We all kind of agree that reality is likely to mean we are facing multiple attackers or, if a single attacker, a weapon. How many in the uechi community train for weaponed attackers? I don't know of any schools that teach it as part of the curriculum. I know it fits well. In the limited two year period I did small circle jujitsu I developed an appreciation for defending against weapons and also saw the way that uechi could be adapted to cope with that.That system is very flexible across all the schools that teach it with individual instructors creating some of their own techniques but a consistency is at least one night per week training against weapons, usually knife.

In uechi we are not training against weapons per se, but in our bunkai do we consider this or do we train this? One thing I did learn from jj is despite the weapon you fight the man first and foremost, not the weapon and focusing too much on the weapon gets you cut. I remember my fourth kyu rank test, the last rank I attained where the test was conducted along with the candidates for ikyu, their highest level of brown belt. We did the same test except the brown belts were expected to be more proficient ( and they were ). We had a three hour test and the last hour was against weapons, the idea that the fatigue would recreate more realistic conditions. guys were operating on adreniline at that point and tempers were flaring at times but most of us semed to be better at that point. It was the first time since my 20's where i felt that feeling of confidence after because I did well. I also remember feeling that despite the rank difference between me and those brown belts -4 kyu grades I believe- the uechi training I had under my belt more that prepared me and that the additional reality training of jj was icing on the cake. Shortly after the test an injury aggravated a hip which eventually led to replacement and unfortunately led to the end of Jujitsu training but I continue to practice these applications as much as I can as part of my bunkai.

Enough about me... do any of you guys train vs weapons as part of your regular training?


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2013 9:51 am 
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Don't think traditionalists will all agree, but IMO this guy gets it as far the potential of our system:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7o8B0ARYEw


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2013 4:11 pm 
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I think that with a weapon you have to be quick to weigh up the situation, and pre empt what they are doing. Many people that I see train too slow, if you train slow then you will act slow, and that is no good, you may as well not act at all. You really have to dictate what is going on.
Many people demonstrate slowly and never really pick up the pace. They should show a fast version as well

This is a good example of meaningful training


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lg3mQMdbTTA


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2013 4:55 pm 
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Good post by Otto and Stryke about the sanchin stance on the train.

Interestingly enough, George would tell us of the sanchin use in fishing boats by Okinawan fishermen.

Historically, the sanchin stance is the foundation of all Okinawan karate because of the coral nature of the island_hilly terrain, sandy or coral beaches, rice paddies, and small fishing boats_ where sanchin gave stability and strong grounding by gripping with the toes, which also made for better dealing with attacks.

The gripping of the floor with the toes and the development of the 'Sokusen'…powerful pointed kicks…with retracted toes is indeed a Uechi-Ryu challenge.

The distal phalanges are flexed [retracted/bunched in] with extreme tension such that the tips of all the toes are facing in the same direction as the rest of the foot.
The big toe is the only striking surface, with the rest of the toes 'gluing together' and in _towards the big toe.

Then we need to practice impact training with the retracted toes to develop a nasty kick. Not very easy to do and it takes time. My Sokusen developed pretty well after the first ten years of dedicated conditioning.

Once you have it, your sanchin stance, even with shoes on, will be more stable because of 'sympathetic 'affect' to the stance 'ensemble', if you will…and the front kick with shoes, even more powerful, given the support of the toes the sole of the shoe will provide.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2013 5:36 pm 
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Good point by Josann about training/bunkai against weapons, such as a knife.

The problem I personally see with knives is that in a street fight we most likely won't see it, and sometimes won't even feel the blade in our body until later, such as evidenced by newspaper accounts of recent, where someone was knifed in Boston, later he noticed bleeding, got to the hospital and died.
Image

And if we do see it, as we learned at the Lethal force institute _[LFI]_ we will experience extreme tunnel vision under the immediate slap of the chemical cocktail, where the eyes and hands will converge on the blade, as it should not.

Now the training at LFI, where a knife was detected, called for an instinctive, explosive, off line movement while accessing our own weapon…always getting out of the 'attack zone'_

All well and good but in real life will we have the time and the dexterity to move quickly and draw our own weapon? Let us not forget what the 'Tueller drill' teaches re time and distance against the blade.

Bob Campbell handled a knife attack once, by quickly rotating around the assailant, grasping the chin with his left hand and pushing the side of the head with his right as he 'flew' behind him for a takedown that could break your neck.

The esteemed Wes Tasker, Pekiti Tirsia Guru, who once came to teach at our Shinkokai dojo, was amazing with his 'zoning out' drills.

And as Ray points out in Jim Maloney's drills, we need to train with explosive movements and force…no matter what it is that we do.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2013 5:41 pm 
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I incorporate weapons. knife , pocket stick and short stick/bat mainly

Good test of movement and congruency

Lairds stuff rocks


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2013 6:04 pm 
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In all these discussions...keep this in mind...worth slipping this in time and again_

Mas Ayoob
Quote:
Investigators are taught to immediately take the parental role in what is a
classic parent/child relationship, forcing the interviewee into the child
role. One problem with this parent/child paradigm is that the child feels a
very powerful, sometimes irresistible urge to please and satisfy the
parent. When the authority figure that's asking the questions insists on an
answer, it's human nature to want to come up with something that seems to
satisfy the demanding parent.

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