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PostPosted: Sun Apr 14, 2013 11:28 pm 
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True enough, Mark. Abuse of shins is a well known thing in soccer players as they dish out and take some terrible blows wih the tremendous power of their kicks.

One thing they try to watch out for is not bruising the bone...very dangerous.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 14, 2013 11:32 pm 
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http://www.wisegeek.org/what-are-the-si ... -tibia.htm

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Swelling may also occur when a bruised tibia is present in the leg. Blood may essentially pool around the injury, leading to what is known as a hematoma. Severe hematomas can be extremely dangerous and should be examined by a doctor, though minor hematomas may produce little or no real risk. It is best to get the injury examined by a doctor if the injured person is unsure of the severity of the injury. In some cases, light massaging of the affected area can reduce pain, and first aid for the injury includes rest, ice, compression, and elevation, known as the RICE treatment.

If the pain is persistent or severe, a bone fracture may have occurred and medical attention will be necessary. This commonly occurs when the force from impact was severe. A fracture may be minor and only require immobilization and the RICE treatment, though more severe fractures can cause complications such as internal bleeding or nerve damage, and attention from a doctor will be necessary. The most severe instances of a fracture may require a surgery that repairs the bones with screws or plates.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 14, 2013 11:34 pm 
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Inter-osseus Bleeding

Inter-osseus (which means inside the bone) bruising occurs from compressive forces being applied to a bone that cause internal injury to the bone marrow, typically from repetitive activities. Higher-level athletes are among those who are most affected by this injury type because of the extreme level of play and the intensity of the activities and training. Professional athletes, such as football and basketball players as well as runners, are at higher risk for these injuries.

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When the bone marrow is injured, the blood supply within it is damaged, causing internal bleeding. This, in turn, can cause a buildup of pressure inside the bone, called bone marrow edema, which can cause pain and ultimately the death of the bone if bleeding and pressure are not resolved.

Typical areas for this injury type is in the knee and ankle because of the extreme pressure loads these joints endure on a regular basis.


Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/24790 ... z2QU3V3wzs

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 14, 2013 11:47 pm 
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http://www.phoenixgymbkk.com/training-f ... s-400.html

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Wolff’s Law

Wolff’s Law is the scientific theory that supports the idea of bone conditioning. Human bones are like hollow tubes. When a bone breaks, calcium fills in the break and makes the bone denser. It’s a lot like how you can make a muscle larger and denser from working out. When you work out your muscles, you create micro-tears in your muscle fibers and then the muscles get slightly bigger after they repair. So, when Muay Thai fighters condition their shins, they don’t completely break their shin bones, they just create micro-fractures that fill in and become denser.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 14, 2013 11:49 pm 
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http://www.phoenixgymbkk.com/training-f ... s-400.html

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Train Hard – Train Smart

Many Thai fighters start training between 8 and 12 years old, and begin competing professionally between ages 16 and 22. They will spend around 6 hours a day kicking heavy bags, pads, and other modern equipment. After years of this type of training they will have conditioned their shins like iron as would be expected from that type of dedication.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 4:19 am 
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More joint strengthening drills for the shoulder joint ... a pre class warm up.

Van has started a very interesting dialogue on conditioning and the potential for harm when this process is rushed. Tomorrow I'll start a new thread on this topic.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 5:03 am 
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...and Stryke I see what you mean about quick recovery being the key in a real fight. Perhaps another way you can address the problem is to train the mind to remain calm in these situations so there isn't as much of an adrenaline dump?


Definately the goal , but I guess my approach is to test from worst case scenario and dial back from there , learning to function better under high heart rate is possible IMHO, and seeing how much of component is physical and how much is emotional , I must agree with Vans caveat about medical checks and knowing ones limitations when expirementing though, Ive played with this myself and taken a few people through it , but I wouldnt recomend it for everyone.

I think people often see adrenilan as a polar force , they consider it usefull or the consider it detrimental , my advice would be to understand/experience and be familiar with the symptoms and purpose and mitigate the panic and distress by acclimitising oneself with safely conducted pressure testing , both physical and mental. understanding heart rate as a tool , and breathing as a tool , and the mind body link in this regard.

of course real fear cant be produced, but pressure and stress induced incrementally can reveal much , wether it be a sporting venue, scenario training or monitered physical duress.

its not something I do often , but it revealed a lot and gave me a different perspective on capacity , and the ambush state.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 5:13 am 
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I beleive an important consideration in shin conditioning is the minimal blood flow to the shins, bruising takes longer to heal, and while many debate the benifits I think a good linament can go a long way to get the blood flowing. But I dont think you can afford to get too much bruising and not expect to take time out from your routine to let it heal.

better to have less intensity more often IMHO

I also beleive shins are much like the knuckles and are more easily infected if the skin is broken because of the lack of said blood flow/tissue , A soccer sprig to the shin of a friend led to a hospital stay through infection.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 5:24 am 
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Good post Stryke. The problem really is the trying to achieve max conditioning in a short period of time, where some students don't have the discipline to do it slowly, don't bother to study the medical aspects of it, and might even be proud to show off a completely messed up shin.

Infection is a real possibility as you indicate in the soccer situation. I think getting some karate-ka obsessed with shin conditioning to play a soccer game would sober him up pretty quick.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 2:17 pm 
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This should be of interest
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Alive Bones Adapt

We can’t see our endoskeleton. Common visual aids are x-ray imaging and anatomical models. These belie the complex dynamic nature of living bone. From the outside in, it consists of hard cortical bone, spongy trabecular bone and bone marrow, which is a mixture of fat, blood and lymph. Moreover, blood vessels interpenetrate all of these layers to transport raw and waste materials.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 2:26 pm 
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This is most important
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Stress to bone triggers a physiological response to create it. This mechanism is mediated by two kinds of cells. Osteoblasts buildup and osteoclasts breakdown bone.

When your bones undergo a minimal essential strain (MES), new tissue generation initiates. MES is 10% of the force that fractures bone. Most daily activities, and soft slow styles of Self-Defense training, do not exceed this.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 2:27 pm 
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In other words, to engender bone growth, you must surpass the MES threshold. When your bone encounters tensile, compressive or torsional force — osteoblasts mobilize towards its surface (periosteum). Once there, they lay down proteins, especially collagen, to reinforce your bone matrix. Eventually mineralization (into calcium phosphate crystals) occurs, resulting in thicker and denser bone.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 8:55 pm 
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I'm trying to increase my intake of dairy products to ensure that an adequate supply of calcium is available for repair/rebuilding of my bones in light of the work that I'm doing.

I know that soccer players can get some pretty nasty injuries to the shins. I wish I had played more soccer when I was growing up for several reasons including the kicking power that it seems to build. As it stands, I don't have strong kicks although this fact may also prevent me from overdoing it on the heavy bag.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 9:43 pm 
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I wish I had played more soccer when I was growing up for several reasons including the kicking power that it seems to build.


The running alone builds very strong bones and big muscles of the legs that generate lots of power in the way they contract on impact with the ball.

Here's Zanetti of Argentina:

Image

Good guy to invite to a leg banging contest :lol:

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2013 1:57 pm 
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Strong bones, strong muscles, conditioned shins, and lots of dexterity!


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