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 Post subject: That kind of violence
PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2013 11:15 pm 
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Chris Ranck-Buhr
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The scariest people are not necessarily the most dangerous, and the inverse is also true.

If you look at a lineup of serial killers they tend to be among the weediest, physically unimpressive people you can imagine. And yet they have far more kills to their names than the 'roided-out guys with swastikas on their necks.

In general, the people who bulk up, get aggressive neck tattoos and walk around mad-dogging everyone do so out of a deep-seated fear—they're trying to scare people away from them.

They shine their aggression so brightly you get to see them coming at a distance and avoid them. The blatant warning allows you to alter your behavior to give their antisocial selves wide berth. Win-win for everyone involved.

The ones you really have to worry about are the quiet, unassuming ones, the ones who slip right under the radar. A scrap with a badass is almost always survivable; an encounter with a killer is not.

This is why what we're really training for is asocial violence—attempted murder must be met with action in kind. It's not survivable any other way.

"Bigger, faster, stronger" isn't an issue with knives, bats or guns—any more than it is when you know what to do with your fists and boots. But until the day people can see through the potential of physical power and into what makes one truly dangerous—the intent to cause harm—it's something that must be acknowledged, excised and burned, hopefully with one's own hands and in one's own mind, before we can hope to make any progress in training.


--Chris Ranck-Buhr
TFT Master Instructor

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2013 11:18 pm 
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Chris Ranck-Bhur
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What defines a violent criminal?

Is it physicality, a hulking form that hints at caveman antics, eyes clenched like fists? Or is it tattoos and clothing that broadcast antisocial leanings and a desperate lack of socioeconomic status? Perhaps it's the intangible "creep factor" that chills your blood and makes the hair on the back of your neck stand up?

We should all be so lucky.

Everything above comprises the stripes on the skunk's back—fair warning to steer clear—but has little to do with the real threat. . .

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 5:28 pm 
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This is very true. we tend to think of people as stereo types, and there is a reason we have stereo types, it is because they do exist. But We tend to identify with TV charachters and not real people, so people can get surprised by a real psychopath or a potential murderer.
Here is something you may like about perception and reality

Quote
"
"The chances of surviving a knife wound depend on where it is," says Kazim Mirza, lead consultant in emergency medicine at Colchester Hospital.

"I once treated a patient who survived a deep stab wound to the neck because it missed the jugular vein by literally millimetres and all other important structures in the neck.

"On the other hand, people can die from a single stab wound to the groin, or back of the knee, because of the femoral artery.

"The pain from puncture wounds is similar to burns in that the more superficial they are, the more painful they tend to be.

"There will be pain from the initial impact, after which it depends. If the blade severs a nerve there will be no pain.

"And then there's adrenaline, which reduces pain to a large degree. Also, our perception of pain differs from person to person."


Source http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-22966016


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 9:29 pm 
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Excellent Ray, Thanks. As martial arts practitioners, we have so much more to learn when it comes to the kind of violence we don't often think about.

Reason why I make it mandatory for all my students going for Dan ranks to study Rory Miller's books on violence.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 9:46 pm 
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Something from Tony Blauer, a guy I really like for his dedication:


Quote:
TRUE STORY.

I'm on a flight home. It's a red-eye. I'm exhausted and want to sleep. The woman beside me starts talking as we are taxi-ing. She starts telling me about her job and how she almost missed the flight and so on. I'm being polite, trying to listen. But all I'm thinking is 'I want to sleep'. I say nothing thinking that'll end the conversation but nope, she says, "So what do you do?"

Without hesitation I reply, "I'm a life insurance salesman." Thinking to myself 'how clever was that? That'll shut down the discussion' Who wants to talk about life insurance while taxiing on a runway? But no luck. She eyes me up and down and says, "You're no insurance salesman."

I hesitate briefly and reply, "Ok, you're right. I'm a life-extension insurance salesman."

"A what?" she says.

"Life-extension insurance salesman - I teach self-defense."

"OMG, I always wanted to learn self-defense!" She exclaims, animated like we were going to do her first lesson in-flight.

I looked at her and said, "No you didn't. People who really want to do things, do them. If you really wanted to learn self-defense you'd have learned already..." I paused. She looked a little irritated. "So excuse me for putting words in your mouth, but I think what you meant to say was that you always wanted to know how never to be near a situation where you might have to defend yourself."

She took that in. I could see her decoding it in her mind. Then her eyes got big and she said "OMG Yes! That is what I meant!"

And there you have it my friends, the truth and the paradox of personal safety. Most of the world doesn't want to learn self-defense because that means they need to accept and then take responsibility for their physical safety and that's scary. What most of the world wants is to never be near a situation where they might have to defend themselves. I get that.

But here's the problem. The bad-guy, the predator doesn't care. Not only does he not care, but he smells fear and mostly looks for complacency. In other words, not learning anything about self-defense compounds the problem should you accidentally walk into a problem.

What to do? Well I'm biased. I think you should learn to defend yourself, your family and even your property if you choose. Most people think learning self-defense takes a long time, but they're confusing learning martial arts with self-defense. That's like confusing a Thruster with an Olympic Clean & Jerk. One is a highly technical movement of an Olympic sport the other is an iconic CrossFit movement that makes you wish you were somewhere else! The CnJ is like technical martial arts, the Thruster like a street fight.

Mull that over. In the mean time read or re-read the blog I wrote on enhancing your safety (and your family's). It doesn't require any training. So whether you decide to train a little or a lot, at least learn how to avoid a situation - it's the smartest choice you can make. Learn how to "Get off the "X"

(GET OFF THE X HERE: http://www.tonyblauerblog.com/2013/09/2 ... ight-back/)

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 12:05 am 
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It's always fun to engage in thought experiments to examine the assumptions that we all have. Imagine the woman in the story is a Mossad counter-intelligence agent en route. Then think of the possible motivations behind the words and actions in the story. Keep in mind that people are playful, and life is like a game of chess.

Start with this: 'She eyes me up and down and says, "You're no insurance salesman."' 8)

And then come back to this: "The ones you really have to worry about are the quiet, unassuming ones, the ones who slip right under the radar."


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 3:30 am 
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Most poignant comments 5D_

It is also a shock to have to come to grips with the many ways death can decide to pay us a visit, no matter what our precautions.

This is chilling...


http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/22/world/eur ... don-attack

Quote:
'They were just animals'

A witness, who identified himself only as James, told London's LBC 97.3 radio station that he saw two men standing by the victim, who was on the ground in the British capital's Woolwich neighborhood.

At first James thought they were trying to help the man. But then he saw two meat cleavers, like a butcher would have.

"They were hacking at this poor guy, literally," he told the radio station, as if they were trying to remove his organs.

"These two guys were crazed. They were just not there. They were just animals."

Afterward, the men appeared to want to be filmed, with one of the attackers going over to a bus and asking people to take photos of him as if he wanted to be on TV.



The site of the attack in Wellington Street, with floral tributes
Image

The last thing in the world this poor kid ever expected.

Image

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 12:37 pm 
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I agree, but he was a soldier, I say this because although this attack was particularly horrible, off duty soldiers are often attacked in Northern Ireland, less so now I admit but in the past, and this fairly recently two off duty soldiers went to grab a pizza and were mown down by machine gun fire, in a drive by type shooting.
When the ira were active in my country there were lots of bombs going off all over the place..and this is a vital thing to remember. If you go into somebody's country and attack them then you can't cry foul when they do it to you. I tend to avoid busy shopping malls or land mark buildings, even now....just in case :wink:

Further to what mr.Dragon said I agree.but remember also with the correct questions asked you can get a lot more out of a person than they think that they are telling.even observation can tell a lot about a person because we all project an image of ourselves, of how we like to be percieved...and this applies to ourselves, you can sometimes spot a karate man by looking at their bareing, their hands etc.it's a bit like the spy films we watch, say the Bourne identity...........great film but I imagine a spy as a small weedy type of guy who is very observant, sharply intelligent, commands good language skills and could kill you without a qualm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZgTRl3lj78


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