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PostPosted: Sat Oct 12, 2013 12:50 am 
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https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=445225402267349

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2013 11:50 pm 
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Nakamatsu sensei training.

Very impressive.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULeE9uNnWLU

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 3:42 am 
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I couldn't get the first clip to work , but like the second , I like the mechanics but personally make them smaller , it is a wave dynamic and a clear weight transfer and double hip , this can be made very internal after a while but nothing wrong with ingraining and doing the mechanic big.

here's a great old clip showing the double hip form Peter Consterdine

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRqfYwhsQdQ


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 2:20 pm 
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This is extremely educational.

http://www.exercisephysiologists.com/Bi ... lCONCEPTS/

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 8:57 am 
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Stryke wrote:
I couldn't get the first clip to work , but like the second , I like the mechanics but personally make them smaller , it is a wave dynamic and a clear weight transfer and double hip , this can be made very internal after a while but nothing wrong with ingraining and doing the mechanic big.

here's a great old clip showing the double hip form Peter Consterdine

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRqfYwhsQdQ


I've trained for years with Walter Mattson and now with Joe Graziano. Both, especially Walter, have influence from Mr. Nakamatsu. Walter calls a lot of these types of drills "exaggerations" for training so that they soon become natural ways of generating power. Even after 50 years of training there are not many people I'd guess that can generate the kind of power Walter has from a lifetime of proper and thoughtful application of drills like these. Joe puts it this way, make a big move (in practice) because the big move contains the small move (in practical application under stress).

When training I believe Mr Nakamatsu has a principle he is emphasizing, or thinking about. Walter's dojo had a word on the whiteboard for about a year. I believe it was keiko meaning to "think about". Walter used to say without this karate is just a dance.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 10:47 pm 
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Nakamatsu sensei is, I believe, an accomplished mechanical engineer and a very smart one indeed, in his research of performance biomechanics.

I have heard the concepts of Nakamatsu sensei and Takara sensei's similar approach_ criticized...but what else is new. We all have different opinions, and such opinions will be respected only if we can provide a credible scientific explanation.

The link I posted sets forth the very scientific principles of athletic biomechanics....

1. Maximum acceleration and efficiency of motion
To achieve maximum acceleration, all available forces should be applied sequentially with proper timing and as directly as possible in the intended line of motion.

Total force
A total force is the sum of the forces of each body segment contributing to the act, if the forces are applied in a single direction and in proper sequence with timing.

A body develops greater velocity as the distance over which the force is applied increases (e.g., for martial arts performer rotates first to increase the force of the kick, as does the athlete who throws the shot).

2.Effect of the angle of application on the force produced
In angular movements of body segments, the maximum effective force and velocity occur when the limb is at right angles to the direction in which the object is moved” (e.g., karate punches in which the arm straight forward, not up or down, so the arm is perpendicular to the body).
Initial muscular tension
Placing muscles on stretch before contraction increases in the force of muscular contraction.

3.Principles of Motion

Principle – Combining translatory (linear) and rotary motion. Effective execution of a successful performance combines translatory and rotary motions.

Once a force (torque) of sufficient magnitude (enough to overcome the angular inertia) is applied to a body, angular momentum will be produced.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 10:54 pm 
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The concepts apply to all body power generation in diverse fields.

I was once a forward soccer striker and this was the coaching for a power strike:

Quote:
In soccer kicking_

A number of studies have highlighted the importance of the proximal-to-distal sequence of segmental angular velocities in generating a high linear velocity in the kicking foot.

The linear velocity of the kicking foot is highly correlated with the resultant ball velocity.

To generate linear velocity at the foot a skilled kicker will first rotate the hip backward into extension and flex the knee during the backswing phase of the kick.

As the hip begins to flex, the knee continues to flex slightly, and then is held in this position for a brief period as the hip continues to flex. The knee begins to extend before the hip reaches maximal angular velocity, and, as the angular velocity of the hip declines, the knee velocity increases until the foot’s impact with the ball.


Quote:
Kicking leg kinetics

The kinetic features of the soccer kick are less well understood than the kinematic features. Putnam’s seminal work demonstrated that the kicking movement is characterized by a complex blend of forces generated by muscle moments, motion-dependent moments that result from interactions among joints and segments, and gravitational forces.

Hip flexion moments are nearly twice as large as knee extension moments, and the smallest moments are associated with ankle plantar flexion. The most influential moments appear to be the extensor moment generated by the muscles that cross the knee joint and the moment associated with the angular velocity of the thigh.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 11:11 pm 
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And as rower...here I am at age 16 in National crewing competition...

Image

And here is the performance context:
Quote:
The oar acts as the link between the force generated by the rower and the blade force and transmits this force to the rowing shell through the oarlock.

Blade dynamics consist of both lift and drag mechanisms. The force on the oar handle is the result of a phased muscular activation of the rower. Oar handle force and movement are affected by the joint strength and torque-velocity characteristics of the rower.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 11:32 pm 
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And as a shot-putter in college, the coach .... upon the summation of force
Quote:
Summation of force
We already know from Newton’s second law of
motion that the greater the force applied to an
object is, the greater the acceleration. But how
do we create the force to produce this rapid
acceleration?

To obtain maximum force, it is
necessary to combine or add up the forces applied
by different body parts. This concept is known as
the summation of force.

The summation of force is influenced by the:
• number of body parts used in the movement
• order and timing of their involvement
• force and velocity generated
• way in which the body and body parts are
stabilized and balanced.


At the time we were using the 'glide method' of throwing the shot.

Here's the Glide I used...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FtM49-1w6Gs

Later, the shot throw went to some unbelievable distances due to the 'rotational method'

Watch the famous Randy Barnes in action here ...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ZdDvlwpe7Q

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 24, 2013 3:23 am 
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An excellent thread , great information


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 24, 2013 3:36 am 
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Glad you find it of interest Stryke. I have noticed over time your increased ability to generate power with rotation. Bet you would have found that 'handy' in your hundreds of full contact matches.

Quote:
When a player uses just a few body parts, the force produced will be less than when a player uses many
body parts. This is why the best techniques for throwing, kicking and striking use more than just the obvious
body part that fi nishes the action.

Also important for force production is the sequence in which parts of the body are used. For best results,
movement begins with the larger, slower body parts and finishes with the smaller, faster body parts.


This is what we see in Sensei Nakamatsu's concepts...as Josann wrote, in time those circles become almost invisible to the eye as the rotation explosion happens along the body's centerline.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 24, 2013 3:55 am 
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The summation of motion in rowing is fascinating to examine, given the complexity of the stroke....

1.Catch
Rowers legs and back are fully compressed with shins perpendicular to the water, arms are fully extended as the oar enters the water. As a result the blade of the oar must also be perpendicular to the water.
Blade entry occurs at maximum shoulder extension and is initiated by an independent movement of the handle in relation to the shoulders.

2.Drive
Arms remain straight.
At this point the shoulders and arms provide connection for the power source of the legs, hips and lower back. They do not provide the power!
Legs engage while the back begins to extend.

3.Release
A release angle of 110 degrees in considered optimal.
Hands brush the abdomen, at this point the hands tap down to remove the blade from the water.
Blades are feathered to become parallel to the water and allow for a more aerodynamic position and to allow rowers to clear any wash or rough conditions that may be present.

4.Recovery
The recovery sequence operates in reverse of the drive sequence.
The hands carry the oars to an extended position.
A pivot at the hips occurs, maintaining a strong lower back.
Slide moves when body passes through 90 degrees.
Full body swing is established by half slide.

Image

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 24, 2013 4:02 am 
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Van Canna wrote:
Glad you find it of interest Stryke. I have noticed over time your increased ability to generate power with rotation. Bet you would have found that 'handy' in your hundreds of full contact matches.

Quote:
When a player uses just a few body parts, the force produced will be less than when a player uses many
body parts. This is why the best techniques for throwing, kicking and striking use more than just the obvious
body part that fi nishes the action.

Also important for force production is the sequence in which parts of the body are used. For best results,
movement begins with the larger, slower body parts and finishes with the smaller, faster body parts.


This is what we see in Sensei Nakamatsu's concepts...as Josann wrote, in time those circles become almost invisible to the eye as the rotation explosion happens along the body's centerline.



Its just an excellent approach , totally agree with first recruiting the mechanics and ingraining the sequences before going smaller.

Here's some striking from Geoff Thompson , going in the direction your going , and incorporating the rotation and the linear to get both halves going , however you produce it its that feeling of torque that you could just see in the clip.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EvEzqysPg2A

appreciating the science and the art takes time , I certainly wish I had the loose power I have now.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 24, 2013 2:33 pm 
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Mr. Thompson is quite the striker...and he has proven it over and over in all the street fights he was forced into.

Pretty hard to argue with what we see on this clip.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 25, 2013 2:49 am 
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Agreed Van , I'm always amazed by the variations and how lots make many things work , but however you do it , what makes it work does remain the same , whether internal/external , big small , principles remain


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