Reasons

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Re: Reasons

Postby Van Canna » Sun Mar 30, 2014 3:08 pm

The student continues to refine these concepts thru the study and performance of the subsequent forms… Kanshiwa = Kan (from Kanbun) and Shiwa (from Shuu Shiwa).

Kanshuu = Kan (from Kanbun) and Shuu (from Shuu Shiwa).

Seichin = Sei (ten) and Chin (challenge).
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Re: Reasons

Postby Van Canna » Sun Mar 30, 2014 3:10 pm

Seisan = Sei (ten) and San (three). Simply “13” – In Shaolin, techniques were taught in separate training rooms (or phases) as simply individual fighting techniques, and were not put one after another in sequence.

This form was taught in the 13th room, training space, or stage/phase of training, and combines all the techniques taught in the previous 12 stages into a specific floor pattern as a kata – like putting together the pieces of a puzzle.

Seisan now combines and balances the three elements, outlined above, in one complete form.
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Re: Reasons

Postby Van Canna » Sun Mar 30, 2014 3:11 pm

Next we have Seiryu = Sei (ten) plus Ryu (six), “16”. This kata teaches antekan – stability of stance in motion combined with the strong delivery of wide-sweeping upper-body technique.

And _Kanchin that teaches ikkyodo – to complete or deliver a sequence of movements smoothly as a single technique.
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Re: Reasons

Postby Van Canna » Sun Mar 30, 2014 3:12 pm

We now come to _Sanseiryu or Sandairyu = San (three) Dai (Chinese pronunciation of Sei – ten), plus Ryu (six).

This kata incorporates the development of dai-rokkukan – considered almost a “6th sense”, this is the ability to recognize and pre-empt an attack, teaches maximized use of peripheral vision, sharpens the evaluation of space available for executing technique (how to maximize efficient use of the fighting space), etc. It is a natural survival skill found in most predatory animals.
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Re: Reasons

Postby Van Canna » Sun Mar 30, 2014 3:14 pm

Each successive form applies and refines the training lessons learned in the previous forms. All previous forms are further refined and improved via the skills and concepts found and developed in the successive forms.

In essence, upon learning the concepts of one kata the student returns to a previous kata and incorporates newly-learned concepts, developing a different and more advanced performance perspective on all forms up to the latest.

Each successive kata holds a vital concept that is necessary to the full understanding of that kata, preparing one for the next concept (or blend of previously-learned concepts).
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Re: Reasons

Postby Van Canna » Sun Mar 30, 2014 3:16 pm

While it seems that each of the five kata presents both repeated and increasingly complex techniques, in fact they express natural concepts. These training concepts are framed within techniques that appear mechanically complex but are actually quite simple to perform.

Understanding the concepts found in one kata has a profound effect on the development of the next kata, and the refinement of the previous kata.

Upon returning to a previous kata, one finds within its structure an entirely new approach and meaning for that kata. The changes are profound to the performer, and the kata can never be the same again.

Advanced kata unite or blend performance or training concepts, but only after those concepts are realized.

As stated in the UechiRyu Kyohon, Seisan unites and blends for the first time the concepts taught within the structures of the previous kata, but only after the student is aware of those concepts, understands them, and trains to apply them.

Omit or move one kata or concept from the intended progression, and Seisan is performed ... quite differently!
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Re: Reasons

Postby Van Canna » Sun Mar 30, 2014 3:35 pm

From my own personal viewpoint I also see some very essential combat concepts in Sanseiryu that I seek to improve upon in each class.

The most important being the ability to move around the opponent and to get off a line of incoming force...the so called getting off the X...the X being your position as the intended target.

You need to move, strike and reposition constantly to points of advantage while orchestrating the next application, in a 360 degree manner.

This is also the way to practice while doing impact training with BOB on the floor with the focus on landing powerful blows, remembering that in the street, especially when under attack by large adrenalized assailants, powerful blows at the right targets is what works best.
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Re: Reasons

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 31, 2014 1:26 pm

As stated in the UechiRyu Kyohon, Seisan unites and blends for the first time the concepts taught within the structures of the previous kata, but only after the student is aware of those concepts, understands them, and trains to apply them.


And it would make sense to train to apply the concepts against the habitual acts of violence against a powerful, non cooperative, committed opponent, instead of routine humdrum bunkai.

Rory Miller is great for setting up such training stages.
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Re: Reasons

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 31, 2014 2:08 pm

And no matter WHAT we train or HOW we train...here is something to be judicious about as per Darren Laur
What this means to me is that in an unexpected spontaneous attack, if you are training motor skills that are not congruentwith what the amygdala will cause the body to do, more specifically the "Somatic Reflex Potentiation" no matter how well trained the response, it will be overridden.

But many in the combatives field believe that we can make a trained response the dominant response through repetition and training using stimulus/response training methods.

In a "high road" scenario this will work given SSR issues and Hick’s law, but in a "low road" scenario, the answer will only be "yes" as long as the motor skill taught is congruent with the automatic protective reflex the amygdala will cause the body to take.
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Re: Reasons

Postby Evan Pantazi » Mon Mar 31, 2014 2:20 pm

Van,

I am glad to hear that you are also well into the tactical realities of the Kata (I have known this since the beginning of my involvement with the forms and meeting you).

So much is missed by so many doing Dojo Karate and what I see with societal breakdown ensuing daily, that more realists will be sought in the escalating welfare state and depression. (that wasn't too loaded a statement was it)?

My folks have been heavily involved in this evolution for many years as well... walking of course a fine line in the commercial as opposed to the private instructional realms. But even now we have been even involving it in the commercial realm with growing enthusiasm of even non martial artists. In fact I see this as the next dominant force in the arts over the current MMA fad.
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Re: Reasons

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 31, 2014 2:25 pm

Good stuff, Evan.
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Re: Reasons

Postby Van Canna » Mon Mar 31, 2014 2:28 pm

A police publication reads as follows
When people are taken by surprise, or when things go to 'hell' _

Regardless of training level, the more stress we are under, the greater the SANS dominance, and thus the less voluntary control we have over our physiological mechanisms and even
muscle control.

And Iʼm talking here about the most competitively selected, highly trained, supremely talented warriors that this earth has ever produced.

Ladies and gentlemen: if they lose muscle control and focus under stress—if even they enter SNS override sometimes—what arrogance makes you think you wonʼt?


So what does all this mean for training? We need to avoid the conceit that because we have trained a number of people to perform a skill under stress, that _ that skill is “validated” as combat-worthy.

In an actual encounter, stress levels can go much higher than in training for several reasons, and once they do, our people will enter SNS override where only a few hard-wired techniques will work.

The reasons that stress in an actual fight can far exceed stress in the training environment include:

a) It is for real. No one really thinks they will die in
training.

b) It is not under our control.

c) We may be out-gunned, out-classed, or out-numbered.

d) It takes us by surprise.

Again, the lesson is to train for our likely encounters with the most effective techniques, as realistically as possible.

And to train in the few techniques that work if the situation goes to hell and we are at Mother Natureʼs mercy .-

RM
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Re: Reasons

Postby Evan Pantazi » Tue Apr 08, 2014 3:43 pm

Training Realistically... here is a bit of real life training : http://www.kyusho.com/realities/

When we train, we use different environments, situations (all spontaneous) and numbers of assailants. We film everything and review forproblems you can not see when you are in it. We then relate it to our martial study to see what influence if any helped or hurt us.
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