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 Post subject: Master James Thompson
PostPosted: Sat Apr 19, 2014 2:37 pm 
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I wasn't able to attend the 40th celebration of Buzz Durkin's dojo, a wonderful event, where Thompson sensei was invited to teach seminars.
But what interesting to me is that our friend Jim Thompson also incorporates Aikido in his Uechi training:

http://www.bennettskarate.com/Master%20Thompson.html

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His second tour lasted from March 1970 to September 1973, during which time he again studied at the Hombu Dojo in Futenma. Master Thompson has worked with the top students of Uechi Ryu including Shinyu Gushi, the Shinjo Family, the Uechi Family, and the Tomoyose Family, and received his black belt diplomas from Master Kanei Uechi.

Mr. Thompson also studied Okinawan Kubudo (Weaponry) and Aikido with the Japanese self defense forces while on Okinawa and worked with several Judo and Tae Kwon Do instructors at Fort Bragg, N.C..


Master Thompson is the founder and president of the Kokusai Kyokai branch of Uechi Ryu Karate-Do, based in Kalamazoo, Michigan. He created the Kokusai Kyokai branch starting in 2000. Master Thompson received his black belt ranks up to 7th dan through Kanei Uechi, and was given the status of Kyoshi. Master Thompson received his 8th degree, Hachidan, from both Kanmei Uechi and Shintoku Takara. Master Thompson's present rank of 9th degree (kyudan) was awarded by Yoshistune Senaga of the Okinawan Karate-do Federation. Uechi Ryu Kokusai Kyokai includes various dojos across North America as well as one in Germany.

Upon creating the Kokusai Kyokai branch of Uechi Ryu, Master Thompson included Aikido training along side the Uechi Ryu system in hopes of regaining the grappling aspects of Okinawan Karate. The form of Aikido Master Thompson has integrated into the Uechi Ryu system is known as Seidokan Aikido. Master Thompson has studied various forms of aikido including Aikikai and Yoshinkai, but finally settled on the Seidokan system. In Uechi Ryu Kokusai Kyokai, students can receive black belt ranks in both Uechi Ryu and Seidokan Aikido.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 19, 2014 2:48 pm 
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I also find some Uechi commonalities in this clip of Wudang Bagua Applications of the Palms

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blhFi2B37zU

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2014 10:55 pm 
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Excellent clip Van, lots of pretty clear thing to explore .

Aiki and Bagua footwork blend well with uechi the circle of uechi fits both and it gets you of the x


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2014 3:23 pm 
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Stryke wrote:
Excellent clip Van, lots of pretty clear thing to explore .

Aiki and Bagua footwork blend well with uechi the circle of uechi fits both and it gets you of the x


Yes, I really like this clip...it makes sense, especially when up against such a huge strong opponent as we see in the video.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2014 9:15 am 
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A couple of points there are many styles/ types of Aikido and they are not all the same ,same as with bagua. That bagua guy is really good but I don't think he would be much good in a fight. Real fighting tends to look pretty crepe.
look at judo, the only time it looks good is when you have a total beginner fighting a really seasoned veteran, same as boxing. I think people need a little grounding in that befors they try to learn "Styles". :lol:


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 2:14 am 
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Ray,

I don't look at what some people teach as a measure of how good or tough they really are in a street fight.

I look for concepts that a good fighter can absorb and practice to see if they help him become a better fighter.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 7:18 pm 
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I think of it as art rather than anything else. I did a heckuvalot of Aikido and Tai Chi but /i wouldn't use any of it in a real fight. I think that you have to be 100% confidant in what you do. AS they say " An honest man when he realises he is mistaken, either loses his mistakes or loses his honesty" 8)


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2014 7:42 pm 
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Being able to move off the X...sidestep...flank...reposition to advantage...is an essential aspect of self defense...

Also an essential component of contact sports...look at soccer players as an example...as a former player, I can tell you that if I did not have the skills to avoid nasty tackles with cleated soccer shoes spearing at your legsImage would not have much 'legs' left.

Any training that focuses on getting off line and redirect, in one way or another, is essential to a good fighter.

But I also agree that some of what is taught by some, is not very useful...this applies to any discipline.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 4:21 pm 
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Quote

But I also agree that some of what is taught by some, is not very useful...this applies to any discipline.


Over the years I have learnt some very fanciful techniques from so called masters who had never been in a fight in their lives.
Even with respected styles though you need good solid basic techniques, and you need to question all the time, try stuff out and see what works for you and what doesn't with equipment like poor bob . I can't get boshinkans to work on poor bob for example, maybe some folks can in which case to them it is a valid tecnique. With clever stuff like wristlocks they don't always work and some can fail miserably, so I do what I call balistic wrist locks, not a lock but an out and out attempt to break :lol:

of course I don't do this with training partners though.


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PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2014 3:11 pm 
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Mr. Thompson taught John Van De Laar, who in turn was my instructor back at the turn of the millennia. He, too, incorporated Aikido into his classes.

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Last edited by Jason Rees on Fri May 09, 2014 3:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2014 8:58 pm 
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Best of both worlds :)

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PostPosted: Wed May 07, 2014 2:58 am 
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Van Canna wrote:
I also find some Uechi commonalities in this clip of Wudang Bagua Applications of the Palms

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blhFi2B37zU


In spite of kb problem just want to say, so do I.

Great bagua clip.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2014 4:02 pm 
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I worked with Sensei Thompson in 2003 and I think he had just begun working with aikido.
Aikido is similar to Iaido in many of its movements from what I am told.

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