help with symantics

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Re: help with symantics

Postby Otto » Tue Jun 03, 2014 5:49 pm

"I am looking for a word or phrase to describe the fear of engaging in combat."

I think the term in proper Latin is "Villaritis Fredum" (term is based on the Latin monetary system)

Apologies, Van. As much as I try, sometimes I just can't resist.
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Re: help with symantics

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jun 03, 2014 8:23 pm

:mrgreen:
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Re: help with symantics

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 05, 2014 4:43 am

Here's something worth reading.... http://forcenecessarytv.blogspot.com/20 ... right.html

There are also many small hairs to be split in this subject. Is just backing up just a few steps, officially called a "flight?" What about under-reacting? Naive TV news viewers complain when they see films of citizens ignoring a vicious assault occurring on the street, or say - on a pizza line before them. They seem to freeze or ignore the crime!

Dr. John Leach, author of Survival Psychology teaches an advanced course in survival psychology in Lancaster University in England. Leach has a name for some freezing (and for people who seem to ignore crimes happening before them). "It's called the "incredulity response." People simply don't and can't believe what they're seeing before them. So they go about their business, engaging in what's known as ‘normalcy bias.” Under-reactors act as if everything is OK and underestimate the seriousness of danger (also this involves the Bystander Effect).
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Re: help with symantics

Postby Van Canna » Thu Jun 05, 2014 4:45 am

“Some experts call this "analysis paralysis.

People lose their ability to make decisions.”

Leach says the vast majority of us...(80%) in a crisis, most will "quite simply be stunned and bewildered. We'll find that our reasoning is significantly impaired and that thinking is difficult. It's OK, and it doesn't last forever. The key is to recover quickly from brain lock or analysis paralysis, shake off the shock and figure out what to do.”

from Ben Sherwood's book, the Survivor's Club - "When people find themselves face-to-face with a catastrophe, be it a fire in a movie theater or a sinking cruise ship, the most common response is to think Something like this could never happen to me. "People just don't believe it," says Sherwood.

"The phenomenon, dubbed the incredulity response by survival expert John Leach, PhD, occurs when someone confronted with disaster loses his or her ability to make choices." Your brain just can't process what's going on, and it freezes up, leaving your body without instructions. So instead of fleeing, calling 911, or jumping to action, people often turn into statues, walk in circles, or carry on as if nothing is wrong."
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Re: help with symantics

Postby Otto » Tue Jun 10, 2014 2:52 am

Van Canna wrote:
“Some experts call this "analysis paralysis.

People lose their ability to make decisions.”

Leach says the vast majority of us...(80%) in a crisis, most will "quite simply be stunned and bewildered. We'll find that our reasoning is significantly impaired and that thinking is difficult. It's OK, and it doesn't last forever. The key is to recover quickly from brain lock or analysis paralysis, shake off the shock and figure out what to do.”

from Ben Sherwood's book, the Survivor's Club - "When people find themselves face-to-face with a catastrophe, be it a fire in a movie theater or a sinking cruise ship, the most common response is to think Something like this could never happen to me. "People just don't believe it," says Sherwood.

"The phenomenon, dubbed the incredulity response by survival expert John Leach, PhD, occurs when someone confronted with disaster loses his or her ability to make choices." Your brain just can't process what's going on, and it freezes up, leaving your body without instructions. So instead of fleeing, calling 911, or jumping to action, people often turn into statues, walk in circles, or carry on as if nothing is wrong."


This is so true. But I believe it's human nature at it's finest. I think we all need to remind ourselves what we were like before we studied Martial Arts, before we lived the last half of our lives. I have a hard time remembering my mindset about survival, or about avoiding a conflict, before I got involved in the Arts. Or when I was in my twenties. I know I was all piss and vinegar (weren't we all?) I also know that what "I knew to be true", was anything but.

When push comes to shove and a person is faced with a life and death decision that involves other people's lives, I want that person to be a good Martial Artist.
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Re: help with symantics

Postby hoshin » Tue Jun 10, 2014 6:04 am

Yes...thank you Van & Rick
Primal freeze, i would say is the actual freeze up. a true non action where you know you should but cant. while the Incredulity response is more for when the brain just cant wrap itself around the situation causing a normalcy bias. wow i love it.
Rick is that your own term ? i will want to credit you every time i use it. i hope you dont need royalties from us all.
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