There is always hope!

Martial Artist get sick, have accidents, become disabled. This forum will focus on how these individuals cope with their condition while staying active in the martial arts and while living life to the fullest. Administered by Sensei Bill Bauknecht. He's been there and doing great! (You don't need to register in order to post here!)

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There is always hope!

Postby Bill Bauknecht » Wed Jun 12, 2002 10:51 pm

We all know that cancer is a scary word, a dreaded word to hear, especially when it is used to describe some problem in our body. I have been through that, and it is beyond scary. Having been diagnosed over 6 years ago, with an uncurable type of blood and bone cancer, I continue to live another day, and another. Certain rare diseases do not get the funding for needed research and for those patients who suffer these diseases, they do not hold much hope for survival. "It is a matter of time." First of all, about 10 yrs ago, bone marrow transplants were first tried on a small number of multiple myeloma patients. This is still considered an experimental procedure. Back then, health insurance would not pay for the transplants. To this day there are doctors who do not believe the transplant extends life anymore than more conventional treatment. In my case, I believe it gave me life. Over the years I have had intense radiation, so much I can't have anymore, and a lot of chemo, have been in and out of remission. Then along came Thalidomide. The 60's drug that was given as a sedative, sleeping pill, to pregnant women. This was disasterous of course, causing many "Thalidomide babies", babies born with no arms, or no legs and other birth defects. Then a few years ago they found that Thalidomide had some affects on certain cancers and after time, it seemed to have some good results with myeloma patients. I was on Thalidomide for 10 months. Though I was never able to get up to the heavy daily dose they wanted me on, I took 150 mg a day until I began having nerve damage and had to quit taking it. Now 8 to 10 months is about the limit that the drug is effective against myeloma anyway. But I believe the drug helped me. After test showed some myeloma activity again, I was put on a low dose, 50 mg a day, of Thalidomide. In two months, my blood counts were all normal and I was in remission again. Now to the point, the reason for this post. Last week I received a phone call from a gentleman I really do not know very well. He told me about an article in the Boston Globe containing info on a new cancer drug that has been used with myeloma patients in clinical trials, and seems to have some very good results. I found the article and sure enough, they seem to have found something that has shown to be successful in containing multiple myeloma. Dr. Ken Anderson of Dana Farber Hospital stated that there is hope that this medication used with conventional therapies or other novel treatments, "we hope we will make myeloma a chronic disease, and ultimately, perhaps, lead to a cure." To me and many myeloma patients, there is hope. Another reason to continue the fight, to never give up. To other cancer patients, if myeloma can be nipped in the bud, so can other terminal diseases. There is always hope as long as the research goes on. Myeloma has always been a death sentence, how long would it take to kill. Now, who knows, if one can live long enough, they may find the cure. I'm sure that you all have been touched in some way, loved ones, friends, someone with cancer. I am just passing on this hope the only way I know how, using myself as an example. Hopefully this type of discovery will inspire somebody who has given up all hope of a cure and resigned themselves to accept the short road, to take the "10" count, in short, curl up and die. Well, bull!! We have to continue the fight and again, who knows what will come along tomorrow. NEVER give in, and never let your loved ones or your friends who suffer from these diseases give in, help them live! You will feel extra good when you do.
Bill
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There is always hope!

Postby Ron G » Thu Jun 13, 2002 7:40 am

Great job Bill, keep up the good work.
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There is always hope!

Postby Deep Sea » Thu Jun 13, 2002 11:32 am

When are you going to teach me how to shoot pool, Bill?

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There is always hope!

Postby LeeDarrow » Fri Jun 14, 2002 7:14 pm

Bill-sama,

If there was ever someone who deserved the appellation of Hero, it would be you.

Domo Arigato Gozaimasu for sharing your story and your message of hope.

With deepest respect,

Lee Darrow, C.Ht.
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There is always hope!

Postby Bill Bauknecht » Mon Jun 17, 2002 10:24 pm

Thanks for the comments,,Allen, I don't know about "teaching you how to play pool" I think you may be trying to hustle me?? You are certainly welcome to come on down anytime, we can shoot a few games and have lunch again.
Lee, thank you for the complement but hero I am not, nor even very brave. I am just trying to survive, as we all are. Even though I have this disease and know what the outcome will be, we all are facing many unknowns in the future. A close friend of mine lost a brother 9/11, was on the 102nd floor. The old saying about getting hit by a truck is true. The only difference is I think that I may appreciate each day more than the average person. My advice?? Live every day like there is no tomorrow. Enjoy every moment, look deeper and really feel your family and friends. Really, what else is there? And don't be afraid to cry, it's OK.
Bill
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There is always hope!

Postby Deep Sea » Tue Jun 18, 2002 2:34 am

Yeah, right! I've heard that everytime you and GEM go for Golf you take it easy on him. Something tells me it's not I who's the slick one. Image

As long as your insurance is paid up on that beautiful, scarce red covering, I'll take you up on the offer, warning you ahead of time that one of the techniques I've mastered is to try to hit the que from underneath it. If we can wrap some sponge padding around the end of the q-stick, I should be ok, though Image

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Thanks

Postby Mills75 » Fri Sep 10, 2004 7:03 am

This was very inspiring and I admire you for your spirit..My favorite movie is the shawshank redemption and in it one of the characters asks himself the question? get busy living? or get busy dying? and of course he chooses to get busy living and also in the movie it says hope is the best of things which i truly believe hope and faith are.Well thank you for the inspiring post and may God bless you and your family and all those you're helping by sharing your story.thanks and best wishes.

Jeff
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Postby Bill Bauknecht » Wed Sep 22, 2004 2:23 am

Thank you Jeff. Sorry I am late, have been busy with other things that come along when one has a crappy disease and the treatment is sometimes worse than the disease itself. They have beat hell out of this body for over 8 1/2 years, now it's the damage they did to the kidneys. Oh well, just another normal couple of months. :lol: Maybe there will be new ones soon..... :idea: Take care.
Bill
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Postby Guest » Tue Aug 16, 2005 5:49 am

bump...
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